Befana

SpellCrafting: Spells & Rituals

January, 2018

La Befana

 

(LA BEFANA. Magic stocking from BEFANA. By incantevolemerletto shop.)

 

Merry meet.

While my mother’s parents were from Sicily, it was not until recently I learned of La Befana, Italy’s oldest and most celebrated legend – about a witch.

In Italian folklore, she is an old woman with warts on her crooked nose, wearing a skirt and a black shawl, who flies around on her broom, delivering candy to well-behaved children. In Russia she is known as Baboushka.

Children await Babbo Natale on Christmas Eve, but the red-suited man is new compared to the story of the old woman who was too busy cleaning to join the Wise Men on their journey. According to the legend, they stopped by her cottage to ask directions and invited her to come along, but she refused. She also refused to join a shepherd who asked her to join him, as some tell the story.

Later that night she saw a great light in the sky. Regretting her decision, she sets out to give the Christ Child gifts that had, according to some, belonged to her child who had died. She never finds the Baby Jesus and instead, leaves her gifts for children she encountered along the way. Since the 13th century, children have left their shoes out or hung up their socks Epiphany Eve, January 5, for the Befana to fill with sweets and gifts. Bad children were given lumps of coal.

Often she is shown covered in soot because, like Santa Claus, she delivers presents by sliding down the chimney. Her name means “gift-bringer” and according to a post by DreamDiscoverItalia.com in 2015, many believe she also sweeps the floor before she leaves, sweeping away the old to make way for the new.

La Befana is a Christian legend that began in Northern Italy and became a big part of the Italian celebration of the Feast of the Epiphany, which commemorates the 12th day of Christmas when the Wise Men arrive in Bethlehem and deliver their gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.

Other versions of the legend have La Befana carrying a sack of bread, giving a piece to every child she saw in the hopes one would be the Christ Child. She never does find him and is still wandering around Italy on her broomstick.

Her arrival is celebrated with such traditional Italian foods such as panettone, fried doughnuts with dried fruit, and fritters with raisins. When children leave a snack for the witch, it’s something soft because she has few teeth.

While La Bafana is viewed most commonly as a village crone, she has also been called a sprite or fairy. Instead of a broomstick, sometimes she is said to ride a goat or a donkey. Rarely does she wear a pointed hat; a headscarf is more traditional.

According to an article written by Martha Bakerhian for tripsavy.com, “This folktale may actually date back to the Roman pagan festival of Saturnalia, a one- or two-week festival starting just before the winter solstice. At the end of Saturnalia, Romans would go to the Temple of Juno on the Capitoline Hill to have their fortunes read by an old crone. This story evolved into the tale of La Befana.”

Heather Greene explains in an article for “The Wild Hunt” in January 2016, “As with many regional traditions, La Befana’s modern construction and appearance were developed over an expansive amount of time and stem from a diverse number of cultural elements. Her story has been adapted over and over to fit into a variety of different social or religious structures.

 

(La Befana the Witch Sculpture by Dellamorteco, Dellamorte & Co. Etsy Shop)

 

Similar to modern community traditions in the northern Italian towns, Circolo dei Trivi burns an effigy, a representation of Giobiana, within their ritual space. They collect the ashes and tell the story of nature’s death and rebirth, through the death of Giobiana and the birth of Belisama. In that process, they also thank nature, represented as La Befana, for bringing the final gifts from the previous year. Grazie, La Befana.”

Urbania, thought to be her official home, draws tens of thousands of people for a five-day festival that includes the arrival of La Befana to her cottage, which the townspeople built in her honor. There is music, dancing, parades, fireworks and letters from children asking for gifts. In Venice, men dressed as La Befana race boats on the Grand Canal, per DreamDiscoverItalia. In Rome and elsewhere, women dress like La Befana.

 

A Spell of Prosperity to Accomplish your Goals 

(Submitted by Gayle Nogas)

What you’ll need:

A red candle placed on a table or altar

Three figs or three dates 

A small cup of honey

A broom 

With this simple spell you can ask The Befana not only to bring your home prosperity, but also to send you powerful energy regarding your success and the goals you will work with next year.

In the evening, put the three figs or dates in the small cup of honey (this is a traditional offering for The Befana) and put them on the table or the altar next to the red candle. These offerings will show that you honor her powers.

Light the red candle. Pull up a chair and sit in it calmly for two minutes watching the candle and bringing your mind to the tranquility of the energy that is surrounding you. The red candle is a symbol of your own power to accomplish your goals and also calls the power of The Befana. Now repeat the following out loud or in your head three times:

“Come Befana, come to me.

Come from the mountains to make me free.

Come with your gifts of wisdom and power,

To make this a prosperous year for me.”

Once you have repeated this spell three times, take the broom and start sweeping the room in the direction of the clock’s hands, always sweeping towards the central part to concentrate there the powers and the charitable energy of The Befana in one place.

Leave the broom and dust all night long. Finally blow the candle and thank The Befana for her help by saying:

“Thank you, Befana, for giving me the gifts of your wisdom and prosperity.”

The next day, pick up the broom, clean up the dust and debris, and focus on a hugely prosperous year.

 

This year, in honor of my ancestors, I plan to recognize the Witch of Christmas for making winter a witchy season. Perhaps I’ll dress like her, or leave my shoes and a soft cookie outside my door. If you celebrate her, please leave me a comment describing how on the Pagan Pages Emag Facebook page.

 

Merry part. And merry meet again.

 

**

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

She Who Is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

December, 2014

Winter Goddesses

As I am writing this, it is a week before the holiday of Thanksgiving, meaning that Winter Solstice is just around the corner. Here in the northeast section of the United States, the weather has begun to get quite chilly and we have had the first tiniest taste of snow, while in other parts of this country, the ice and wind chill has already begun to wreak havoc.

So, I thought this would be the perfect time to write about just a few of the many Winter Goddesses that abound throughout the world.

 

goddess1

 

Colleda is the Goddess of Winter in Serbia.
She was the one to whom the Yule Log was
given as the light from the past year drained
away. When the sun was reborn, the children
went from house to house and received
sweet cakes for the Goddess who brought
back light and growth. She is known as
Kolleda in Russia who embroiders a new
world each Solstice.

 

 

goddess2

 

Angerona is the Roman Goddess of the Winter Solstice. Her feast in held on December 21st, just as the sun energy begins to increase; but just before the balance tips, Angerona reminds her worshippers of how frail the natural balance of the world truly is. She is most often portrayed with her finger to her lips for silence.

 

 

goddess3

 

Befana is called “the lady of twelfth night” in Italy. Many places in Italy still follow the Befana tradition of hanging a lady dressed in rages outside the home on January 5th. Befana delivers gifts to the children and, it is said, she will sweep up before she leaves. Many of us still have representations of Befana in our home without even being aware of who she really is. I have a small statue of her in my kitchen, which is there year-round. She is the proverbial kitchen witch.

 

 

goddess4

 

Cailleach is the gloomy old woman, also called the winter hag. She is known at Cailleach Bheur in Scotland and Cailleach Bhera in Southern Ireland. She is also known as Baira, The Queen of Winter. She is said to rule winter between Samhain and Beltaine. She is capable of ruling the weather, as the staff that she carries freezes the ground. Before there was the groundhog, there was Cailleach. It is said that on Feburary 1st, if it is sunny and bright, the winter will be longer and that She is gathering firewood to keep herself warm for the prolonged winter.

 

 

goddess5

 

Wah-Kah-Nee is “the drifting maiden” of the Chinook Tribe on the Pacific Coast of the United States. Her tribe was struck by a never-ending winter. The ice blocked the rivers from flowing; the cold winds killed the crops. They feared for the survival. It was said that the winter was caused by someone killing birds, but all who were questioned denied it, but a young girl was blamed. The tribe dressed her and exposed her on a block of ice as an offering to the Winter spirits. The ice broke and summer returned. Months later, a block of ice containing the girl, Wah-Kah-Nee, was found. She survived and was then treated as a sacred being by the Tribe. She could could walk unprotected through the winter months and communicate with the spirits.

 

 

goddess6

 

Frau Holle is known throughout Germany, Austria and the surrounding countries. Snow covered the earth when she shook out a feather comforter. She rode in a wagon, on the wind and rewarded good people with gold; she invented spinning. Between December 25th and January 5th, the 12 days of Xmas, she traveled the world. She is associated with many of the evergreen plants used around Yule, such as holly and mistletoe.

These are just a few of the many Winter Goddess from around the world. I hope you have enjoyed reading about them.

I wish you all a blessed Holiday season, filled with happiness, love and joy. Keep the light burning in your heart all year long.

Blessings
)O(