fertility

GoodGod!

September, 2018

Meet the Gods: Mabon

Merry meet.

The fall equinox sabbat takes its name from the Welsh god Mabon. He was called “Mabon, son of Modron,” which means “Great Son, Son of the Great Mother.” The great mother, his mother, was the earth.

According to Arwynn MacFeylynnd, who wrote “A Guide to the Sabbat’s Symbolism” found on WitchesOfTheCraft.com, “In the myth of Mabon, the god disappears, taken from his mother, Modron, when only three nights old. Mabon is freed with the help of the wisdom and memory of the most ancient living animals – the blackbird, stag, owl, eagle and salmon.

All along, Mabon has been quite happy, dwelling in Modron’s magickal Otherworld – Modron’s womb – to be reborn as his mother’s champion, the Son of Light. Mabon’s light has been drawn into the Earth, gathering strength and wisdom to become a new seed.”

In that way, his fertility is recognized as we harvest the bounty of the earth. During this the time of abundance, Mabon is putting his energy and light into the seeds that will be planted for next year’s harvest.

As one of the ancient, most likely lesser gods, most stories about him have been lost.

All we know is that he was stolen away from his mother when he was only three nights old and imprisoned until he was rescued by King hur’s companions,” MacFeylynnd stated.

Knowing what it was like to be held captive in a dungeon, Mabon was said to be a god of freedom, freeing caged animals and those unjustly imprisoned.

He protects all that is wild and free. His animal totems are the owl, the blackbird, deer, eagle and salmon. We honor Mabon when defending the animals, and when we work for the freedom of all people,” is written on witchingtime.com.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

April, 2018

Zemyna

(Photo Credit – Pinterest)

Zemyna is a Lithuanian Earth Goddess. She is the Mother of all things. As the Goddess of Childbirth, one of Her functions concerns fertility. She creates life out of herself and represents the rebirth and renewal of every living thing.

She is honored at the birth of every child. Offerings to Her are left at stones, near trees and in the water, thanking Her for a new life.

Her name, literally, means “Earth”. She is also called *Blossomer*, *Bud-Raiser* and *Flower-Giver*.

All that comes of, and from, the Earth returns to the Earth and so, She also is related to Death.

She is the personification of the fertile earth and nourishes all of the life on Earth, whether is be plant, animal or human. Trees with three leaves or nine branches were especially connected to Her, the most revered being oak, linden and spruce.

(Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

Her people believed that all plant and human life were connected and flowed together. They believed that souls took up residence in the trees that have died. The souls of women went in to lindens and spruce; men in to oaks, maples and birches, while the ancestors of the village would be within the fruit trees. Birds nesting in these trees became symbols of the force of life itself.

The love that the people had for the plant life of the Earth is in the “dainas”, spiritual folk songs of their culture.

With the people being a part of nature, Zemyna helps and supports those who treat the Earth with respect, and helps Her in Her mission of defending the Earth.

It was a terrible thing to dig or strike into the Earth with an iron implement before March 25, as the Earth is pregnant at that time.

If you were to kill an animal for food, Zemyna would forgive you. If, though, you were to kill an animal for fun, or for the pleasure of it, Zemyna would not let you get away with that, and consequences will surely follow. The more you negatively do to Nature, the more She will make you pay. You can pray, but you will not deflect Her anger.

(Photo Credit – lituanus.org, Sculpture by Vytautas Maciuika)

Beyond this, Zemyna is loving and good-natured. She rewarded those who took care of the Earth. She was a source of strength and power to Her people. Respect could be shown to Her by pouring some of whatever you were drinking upon the Earth itself.

Offerings were also left at regular intervals, mostly of bread and ale. If offerings were not made, there could be dire consequences. These offerings were left at Her places of worship, near large stones, which were a representation of the Omphalos, the power center of the Earth.

She may have been married to Perkunas, the thunder God. The wedding is celebrated in the Spring, when the Earth reawakens.

Her greatest festival is at Summer Solstice. Families bathe in streams and rivers in celebration of the moisture of the earth.

(Photo Credit – Pinterest by Jennifer Kuhns)

The worship of Zemyna is different than that of the patriarchal religions, which state that the Earth is secondary to man and that it is here for man’s consumption. For Zemyna, Her people know that Nature is sacred and permanent. While we, as humans, may die, Nature is always here.

“When we are gone,

they will remain,

wind and rock, fire and rain

They will remain

when we return

the wind will blow

and the fire will burn”

~~ Reclaiming

***

About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis, the Egyptian Goddess”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is MysticalShores@gmail.com

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GoodGod!

February, 2018

Meet the Gods: Pan

(art by Samantha Sullivan)

 

Merry meet.

A man with the legs and horns of a goat, Pan was the Greek god of the wild and of hunting. He looks after shepherds, their flocks and the woods. He stirs up panic – a word derived from his name –because, one story goes, if his secluded afternoon naps were disturbed, his angry shout inspired panic.

Pan is also associated with sexuality. He chases nymphs, dancing with them in an effort to seduce them, but is always turned down.

One legend tells that he tried to seduce a beautiful wood nymph named Syrinx, daughter of the river god. To avoid him, she ran away, seeking refuge among her sisters. Pan followed, so her sisters turned her into a reed. When the wind blew, there was an enchanting melody. Not knowing which reed was Syrinx, he took seven (or nine) and placed them side by side in decreasing length to make the instrument named Syrinx for his beloved. Pan is typically seen playing them. The flute-like instrument is also known as panpipes.

Stories were told about other nymphs he pursued: Pitys, who was turned into a pine tree to escape him, and Echo who scorned the love of any man. There are different stories about her, one being that Pan had his followers kill her and scatter pieces of her on the earth. Gaia, the goddess of the earth, is said to have absorbed those pieces and now, Echo’s voice remains, repeating the last words of others. In another versions, Echo and Pan had two children.

Pan’s father is thought to be Zeus, Dionysus, Hermes, or Apollo while his mother may have been Aphrodite, Dryope, Hybris or a nymph named Dryope. Whomever his parents were, there is agreement that he was born in Arcadia, a rustic mountain district that was culturally different from the rest of Greece. It was because he was from that area that he became recognized as the god of fields, pastures, groves and wooded glens, and it is because of this that Pan is associated with spring and fertility.

He is notorious for his sexual powers and is often depicted with a phallus.

The Greeks also considered him to be the god of theatrical criticism and impromptus. His greatest conquest was Selene, the goddess of the moon. He hid his goat features by wrapping himself in a sheepskin so he was able to lure her down from the sky and into the forest where he seduced her.

Pan was worshiped in the woods, caves, grottoes and the wild. With two exceptions, no temples were built to honor him.

Pan could be a god you call for help with matters of fertility or to connect to the wild. It would be best to call him from a wooded area, or somewhere outdoors. Call to him with a wind instrument – be it a flute or a whistle – or by singing a series of notes known as the Lydian mode. Offer him milk and honey.

I would advise you only summon him for a genuine need and never for the fun of it.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

February, 2018

Sheela-Na-Gig

(Photo Credit: knowth.com)

What better representation of the Goddess for February than Sheel-Na-Gig?

All over Europe, primarily Ireland and England, adorning castles, churches, sacred sites, you will find carvings in stone of the beautiful Sheela-Na-Gig, a big smile on her face, squatting knees apart, exposing her powerful vulva. It is believed that these carvings were done during the Neolithic and Paleolithic eras. There is still and old energy that lies within these carvings.

While many find Her akin to a gargoyle, or a figure of lust. Many women, though, believe her to be an ancient fertility figure and a representation of the Mother Goddess.

The term “gyg”, in Norse, means giantess or a deified female, aka Goddess. It is thought that these carvings were meant for protection and to ward off evil, which goes a long way toward understanding their appearance on ancient churches.

(Photo Credit: www.beyond-the-pale.org/uk)

The vulva is a holy symbol of birth and life; representing regenerative powers of an Earth Mother/Goddess. The vulva of Sheela-Na-Gig is in the shape of a triangle, another hint that She is a representation of the Goddess. The triangle is a symbol of the three aspects of the Goddess – Maiden, Mother and Crone – the full cycle of a woman’s life (yes, I am not including all of the new additions of Queen, etc.)

It is thought that graves were built in the shape of the Goddess and that Her vagina was the passageway to regeneration and rebirth.

I believe that it is most likely unknown how many of these carvings there are, but this link will give you an idea of those that are in Ireland: http://www.irelands-sheelanagigs.org/

This article researches those in Southern England: http://www.sheelanagig.org/wordpress/category/southern-england/

(Photo Credit: www.atlasobscura.com)

Some of these carvings may be seen as lying on their side or upside-down, which indicates re-use of the stone which originally held the Sheela-Na-Gig carving.

Many of these carvings were taken down and destroyed with the growth of the church, as well as the beginning and rise of patriarchy. It is believed by many that these carvings of Sheela-Na-Gig gave rise to the demonization of women, and of women being portrayed as an ugly hag or crone.

While there are women who find these carvings grotesque and obscene, women who “know”, see Her as an invitation from the Goddess to explore and delve into their own divine feminine. She is the gateway to new adventures, new projects and new paths.

Sheela-Na-Gig is the invitation, the gateway and the re-birth of women who have the courage to really see Her, choose to delve into Her Mysteries and be reborn, knowing of their own Goddess power within and without.

With the fast and rampant rise of patriarchy, women were reduced to nothing but one who serves at home for their spouse, and as sex objects, which is how many see Sheela-Na-Gig. With this reduction of the powerful force of women and the Goddess, women lost their power.

We, as women, need to remove ourselves from the yoke of patriarchy. The time is now for women to rise up and reclaim the power of the Goddess and the power that is held within them; rise up and proclaim “THIS is our power”.

(Photo Credit: www.beyond-the-pale.org/uk

***

About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess, as well as Mago Publications She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Womens Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis, the Egyptian Goddess”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is MysticalShores@gmail.com

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GoodGod!

August, 2017

Meet the Gods: Barleycorn

Merry meet.

Lughnasadh is celebrated this month – traditionally on the 1st, astrologically on the 7th. It is the first harvest, a festival of grain. While traditionally in Europe, corn meant grain, many Americans have come to think of corn only as maize. Because I know of no fields of rye, oats or barley here in Connecticut, maize has been my go-to grain.

While it’s found its way into my rituals as corn muffins, corn dollies and fry bread – to go with the bounty from my garden – I had never sought to welcome the corn god to my circle. This year I will.

Most cultures have a god of grains, fields or agriculture.

 

(Frey)

In the Norse tradition, Frey was the Corn God, the Lord of the Fields. He rode a great white horse and his hair was the golden color of wheat. Every year, he rode into the field where only the last sheath of grain remained standing. He sacrificed himself as it was cut, dying for the good of all as his blood enriched the field to assure next year’s harvest was bountiful.

 

(Osiris)

In Egyptian mythology, it is Osiris who is associated with grain and its lifecycle. He is represents fertility as each year he is harvested and killed. The dead Osiris is put into the ground as seeds which grow to be grain, bringing him to life again.

 

(Yum Kaaz)

The Maya god of corn and wild vegetation is Yum Kaaz, Lord of the Forest.

He is portrayed as a young man with an ear of corn growing out of his head,” according to AllAboutHistory.org.

 

(Centeotl)

Centeotl is the Aztec God (or Goddess) of Maize. Farmers would offer him fruits and grains from their fields that he might protect their fields from wild animals.

Perhaps the best known corn king and harvest god is John Barleycorn. In the English tradition, August 1 marked the sacrificial death of the Horned God in his incarnations as the Corn King or John Barleycorn whose reign began on the Summer Solstice. He is the personification of the lifecycle of grain – from planting to harvest, then malting to make whiskey and beer, and then to planting again.

There is a ballad sung about him.

 

John Barleycorn is the spirit of the fields that at this time are full crops given life by the sun. And it is in the last sheaf or stalk harvested that his spirit is strongest, so he’s dressed in fine clothing, or formed into the shape of a man and this effigy would be cut and typically burned with much celebrating. His sacrifice for the land, for the people and for the goddess became beer and malt whiskey and bread.

The Druid’s sacrificial burning of a larger-than-life wicker man may have been the inspiration for Burning Man. Both rituals are associated with death and rebirth of the god of the grain.

Lughnasadh is a time of transformation, of rebirth and new beginnings. It’s a time of plenty, a time to reap the bounty of your efforts and celebrate abundance that will sustain us as the wheel turns.

After calling the quarters, plan to light a candle shaped like an ear of corn to welcome one or more of these gods. Meanwhile, I would like to know how you’ve worked with them in your practice.

Merry part; and merry meet again.

 

ThriftCrafting: Witching on a Budget

May, 2016

May Memories

Merry meet.

thrift

I take delight in finding so many customs I grew up with in my Sicilian Catholic-German Lutheran family are, in fact, pagan.

From a young age, I remember an Italian aunt always celebrated May 1 with May wine white wine thats been infused with sweet woodruff. I have since learned that the concoction has German roots. Like the May pole covered with flowers and ribbons, so the wine with fresh herbs honors youth, spring and fertility.

You can make some by adding five sprigs of sweet woodruff look for the herb plants at your local nursery to half a bottle of a crisp Riesling and putting it in the refrigerator for eight to ten hours. Strain before drinking.

In Brownie Girl Scouts, we made May baskets. I think we decorated paper cups, added a handle and filled them with wildflowers. I continued the tradition, with my mother encouraging me each year. Most of the time, the baskets were a simple construction paper cones with two holes punched to allow for a handle of ribbon or yarn. I would collect up whatever flowers I could find violets, bluets, dandelions, creeping phlox, grape hyacinths to fill them. Then, I would hang the baskets on neighborsdoors, ring the bell and run before they saw me.

Part of the fun was to remain undetected while also trying to catch a glimpse of their reaction when they found the flowers. Without realizing it at the time, it was also nice to be a child and have something to give adults.

I came to find out that these baskets were also a Beltane tradition perhaps one of the few G-rated ones. I still carry on the tradition, typically by filing odd jars or other containers with wild or purchased flowers and leaving them outside my neighborsdoors or on the desks of co-workers.

Merry part.

And merry meet again.

WiseWoman Traditions

August, 2012

Feeling Frisky? Herbs for Fertility

 

 

For thousands of years knowledge of the herbs and wild plants that could increase fertility were the secrets of the village wise women. But after the holocaust against European Wise Women (the “burning times”) and the virtual extermination of Native American medicine women, this knowledge virtually disappeared. In fact, many people erroneously believe that “primitive people” had no means of controlling the likelihood of pregnancy. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Many common plants can be used to influence fertility, including red clover, partridge berry, liferoot, wild carrot, and wild yam. Some of these grow wild, others are easy to cultivate, and, with the exception of wild carrot, all are also readily available at health food stores.

One of the most cherished of the fertility-increasing plants is red clover (Trifolium pratense). Common in fields and along roadsides, it has bright pink (not really red) blossoms from mid-summer into the chilly days of fall. A favorite flower of the honeybees, the tops (blossoms and appending leaves) are harvested on bright sunny days and eaten as is, or dried for medicinal use. The raw blossoms are delicious in salads and nutritious when cooked with grains such as rice or millet.

 

To make a fertility-enhancing infusion, I take one ounce by weight of the dried blossoms (fresh won’t work for this application) and put them in a quart size canning jar. I fill the jar with boiling water, screw on a tight lid, and let it steep at room temperature overnight (or for at least four hours). Dozens of women have told me that they had successful pregnancies after drinking a cup or more (up to four cups) a day of red clover infusion.

 

It is especially helpful if there is scarring of the fallopian tubes, irregular menses, abnormal cells in the reproductive tract, or “unexplained” infertility. It may take several months for the full effect of this herb to come on and pregnancy may not occur until you have used it for a year or two. You can improve the taste by including some dried peppermint (a spoonful or two) along with the dried clover blossoms when making your infusion. Treat the father of the child-to-be to some red clover infusion too!

That little evergreen creeper that carpets some parts of the woods around your house is partridge berry (Mitchella repens), also known as squaw weed, supposedly because of its ability to enhance fertility. (My teacher Twylah Nitsch, grandmother of the Seneca Wolf clan, says that “squaw” is a slang term meaning “schmuck” or, in the proper term, “penis,” and therefore should not be used in denoting a plant meant to be used by women.) Keep an eye out this spring and see if you can catch Mitchella blooming. Then you’ll see why she’s sometimes called “twin flower.”

 

Interestingly, when the paired flowers fall off, they leave behind but one berry to ripen. (The shiny red berries you’ve noticed in the forest winter or spring. Yes, they are safe to eat, but leave some for the partridges.) The symbolism of two flowers forming one berry is certainly a suitable icon for fertility. I make a medicinal vinegar by filling a small jar with the fresh leaves, adding apple cider vinegar until the jar is full again. A piece of waxed paper held in place with a rubber band and a label (including date) completes the preparation, which must sit at room temperature for six weeks before use. I enjoy up to a tablespoonful of the vinegar on my salads or in my beans.

By mid- to late-May, the yellow blossoms of liferoot (Senecio aureus) enliven my swamp (in upstate New York) and the neighboring roads where there is adequate water and rich soil. A powerful medicine resides in all parts of this lovely wildflower. As the root has a dangerous reputation, I restrict myself to using only the flowers and leaves, which I harvest in bloom, and quickly tincture. (For instructions for making your own tinctures, please see any of my books.) Small doses of this tincture (3-8 drops a day), taken at least 14 days out of the month, will regulate hormone production, increase libido, normalize the menses, relieve menstrual pain, and improve fertility. The closely related Senecia jacobea and Senecio vulgaris can also be used.

 

Wild carrot (Daucus carota), better known as Queen Anne’s lace, is such a common roadside plant that most people are amazed to learn that it is a proven anti-fertility herb. In addition to being the wild cousin of carrot, it is related to parsley, dill, caraway, anise, celery, cumin, and a (now extinct) plant whose seeds were the birth-control of choice for many a classical Greek or Roman woman.

 

The aromatic seeds of wild carrot are collected in the fall and eaten (a heaping teaspoonful a day) to prevent the implantation of a fertilized egg. In one small study the effectiveness rate after thirteen months of use was 99%. As modern scientific medicine reports that one-third of all fertilized eggs are passed out of the body without implanting in the uterus, this method of birth control seems in complete agreement with nature.

 

Of the hundreds of women currently using this anti-fertility agent, I have heard virtually no reports of any side-effects. Note that many books caution you to beware the danger of confusing poison hemlock and wild carrot. Poison hemlock is rather scarce in our area, and, at any rate, does not smell or taste of carrot (as does Queen Anne’s lace), so I believe this warning to be a red herring. In addition, wild carrot leaves have small hairs on them, while the leaves of poison hemlock are smooth.

Another anti-fertility herb that has been tested by small groups of modern women is wild yam (Dioscorea villosa). Since birth-control pills were originally made from this plant, it is not at all surprising that it has the effect of blocking conception when taken daily in rather large doses: either a cup of tea or two capsules taken three times a day.

 

Does it have detrimental effects? Current studies are too small to show any, but there is a possibility that there could be. Interestingly enough, if wild yam is taken in small doses (a cup of tea or 10-20 drops of the tincture daily from onset of menses until mid-period) it increases fertility! In either case, the effect seems to be triggered by the large amount of hormone-like substances found in this root. When taken daily, these substances may be converted into progesterone, thus decreasing the possibility of conception. When taken for the two weeks preceding ovulation, these substances may be converted into LH and FSH, hormones that are needed to make the egg ready to be fertilized.

Other common weeds and garden plants of our area that have been used to increase or decrease fertility include stinging nettle, oatstraw, pennyroyal, Jack-in-the-pulpit, rue, and parsley.

 

The earth is full of wonders, and green magic abounds. As more and more women remember that they are wise women, more of the wonders and the magic will be revealed. May your days be filled with many green blessings.

Rose Embyrs

April, 2011

April Fertility Spell

When the hasty weather of March leaves your doorstep, the winds of April will begin. In mid-April, a full Wind Moon or Seed Moon will muster in a time of new beginnings. Set aside fertility correspondences until the moon is high, then spread your favorite seeds into the air and into the ground. Wild flowers will spring up everywhere soon and your this action-spell for conception or fertility will be answered.

Revel in the splendor of the Goddess as she wakens the trees, sleeping daffodils and makes your herb garden potent. Give roots to what you need growing in your life. A new relationship, riches or insight? Choose wisely, then give those spells a try during the full moon.

I’ve chosen to use the following fertility correspondences from my book, “Spellcaster: Book of Magick”, to enhance the nocturnal conjuring of this spellcasting for April fertility.
Fertility correspondences:

  • Colors: green
  • Trees: oak, hazel, and olive
  • Gods: Astarte, Ishtar, and Cybele
  • Herbs: dandelion, mandrake, and patchouli
  • Flowers: daffodil, orange blossom, and geranium
  • Metals: brass, iron and copper
  • Stone: geodes
  • Element: Air

These are strong and energy-infused correspondences for an April fertility spell. Place these items on your altar before you begin. Use your own spell or try mine to conceive the child you desire.

A Full Ritual For Fertility (Male or Female)

  • Moon Phase: Full
  • Time: Night
  • Place: Outdoors
  • Tools: Sandalwood or Rose incense.
  • Candles: 1 green & 1 red for fertility, 1 white for the Goddess, 1 gold for male fertility. Anoint candles with patchouli oil.
  • Gods/Goddesses: Astarte, Ishtar, and Cybele.

1.     Cast your circle. Invoke the Goddess and deities of your choice. Be specific and explain your need of fertility, either for your mate or yourself.

2.     Light your incense. Imagine the incense filling that part of you that you wish fertility to touch. It must fill you, grow around you and touch every part of you.

3.     Face to the East and say “Watchtowers of Air to the East, blow your wind to cleanse me. Face South. “Watchtowers of Fire to the South, burn away the challenges of fertility.” Face West. “Watchtowers of Water to the West, wash away my strife.” Face North. “Watchtower of the Earth to the North, make me the vessel of new life.”

4.     “Goddess, Mother, Astarte, Ishtar and Cybele, I implore you to heal me, so that I may enjoy the gift of motherhood.”

5.     Lie on the grass or a green blanket with your head pointing North and your arms pointed East and West. “Great mother and goddesses of fertility, make me ripe to bear the fruit of my love. Fill my womb with thy glowing light.”

6.     Feel the energy flow into your limbs and direct that energy to your womb. Concentrate on healing, removing scars, and making your womb strong.

7.     Now, rise and kneel before your alter: Give thanks to the Goddess and deities and blow out the candles one-by-one.

8.     Close your circle, ground and center.

Gems of the Goddess

July, 2009

Epona:  Goddess of Horses, Fertility and Abundance

If you’re looking for a goddess that represents strength, femininity and fertility, look no further than Epona.  Epona is the Celtic Goddess of horses, donkey and mules and was called upon often to protect Calvary in Rome.   Born of a man and mare, she can take equine or human form.
She is known as the protector of horses, horse owners and stables.   There is evidence that Epona was painted on the side of barns and stables as protection to the horses and their riders.  She was most represented in Gaul but her influence is known across Europe, included being adapted by the Romans because horses were sacred to Romans.
Her name translates into “Divine Mare” or “Mare Goddess”.  She is the only goddess that is enshrined and worshipped in Rome as a triple goddess as Epona.   The Festival of Epona is held in Rome on December 18th to honor her.
She is also known as the bringer of dreams, good and bad. Epona can be involved to help heal nightmares in Children or for dream work.   When trying to receive messages or work with dreams for information, ask Epona to help.  Offer her roses to bring her closer.
She is also known as the goddess of fertility and abundance.   Epona links horses, divine and the feminine and is known to help souls take their final journey.
Epona is depicted riding a white horse, which signifies spiritual mastery and shows her high ranking among deities. She is oft en carrying a serpent, with a dog at her side and corn in her lap. Therefore, she is known for fertility and abundance because horses, especially male, are seen as potent sexual symbols so her riding it astride links her to sexuality and unlimited sexual performance.
Epona is also known to grant sovereignty on Celtic Kings and kings were married to her to obtain this sovereignty.
Some of Epona’s symbols are:

* Animals:  horses, donkeys, oxen, mules, birds and dogs
* Plants:  Roses, rosebuds
* Incense:  null, Rose
* Stones:  Carnelian, Moonstone, Chrysophase, Shiva Lingham, Smokey Quartz, Rose Quartz. Bloodstone, Unakite, Rhodonite, Garnet
* Fruits:  Apple or a basket of fruit

How can you bring Epona into your life?  Since she is the Goddess of horses, you can take horseback riding lessons or work with horses.   She is also associated with Fertility; you can create a cornucopia as a representation of her.   With her connection to sexuality, you can call on her to express and explore your sexuality deeper.
Work with Epona during your daily practices to bring in the elements of connecting to animals, the otherworld, fertility and sexuality.

Celtic Awareness

March, 2009

Celtic Goddess’s of Fertility

Eostre is the Celtic and Britannia Goddess of fertility associated with the spring and the pagan feast day Ostara, Eostre gave her name to the Christian festival of Easter, Some of the present day Easter customs can be traced back to our ancestors who worshiped her in years gone by, e.g. they Easter egg.

Blessings of Ostara

In the fertility of the earth we celebrate around the mighty Ash

Promises of faith avail over the bleakness

Ostara you have stead fast against the winter wolves’

Bringing forth once again an end to the cold

In joyous exchange for summer’s blessed warmth

~ Michele Burke (2009)

Benedizioni di Ostara (Italiano)

Nella fertilità della terra celebriamo intorno il possente Ash

Avvalgono di promesse di fede nel corso del bleakness Ostara avete sostitutivi fast contro i lupi inverno ’

Portare via ancora una volta porre fine al freddo

In cambio gioiosa calore Beato dell’estate

Ho cercato di tradurre questo verse ho scritto in italiano ecco che cosa sono giunto fino con

Finora potrebbe dirmi se è corretto?

~ Michele Burke (2009)

ANU

Anu represents the Maiden aspect of Morrigu the Goddess of Mother Earth; she is the manifestation of moon, magic, air, prosperity and fertility.

Olwen

Olwen the Welsh (Celtic) Goddess of the spring flowers symbolizes the earth’s rebirth after a

long winter and love.

The Awakening

Beneath the ancient oak Olwen sleeps

Rhizome arms lie across flowering white breast

Hair blossoming like fragrant chamomile awakening in the spring

Il risveglio (Italiano)

Sotto la quercia antica sleeps chiara

Rizoma armi risiedono tutta della mammella fioritura bianco

Capelli fioritura come camomilla profumato risvegliando nella primavera

~ Michele Burke (2009)

Cerridwen

Cerridwen is th embodiment of fertility, luck, death, regeneration, the arts, poetry, science, inspiration and astrology.

Cerridwen’s Cauldron

In her cauldron she prepares a magical brew.

Yielding three precious drops, each drop its own bestowment has

One for wisdom, One of knowledge and one the secrets of times to come

~ Michele Burke (2009)

Magico di ’s Cerridwen (Italiano)

Nel suo calderone ella prepara un brew magico.

Cedendo tre gocce preziose, ogni goccia che ha la propria bestowment

Uno per la saggezza una delle conoscenze E uno i segreti dei tempi a venire

~ Michele Burke (2009)

Druantia

Queen of the Druids. Druantia mother of the Druid tree calendar and Goddess  of the Fir, Druantia is the embodiment of fertility, protection, creativity, knowledge, passion, growth, sex, and the forests and the tree’s.

Coming in April: Celtic God’s