greenman

Magical Items Can be Found at Fairy Behind the Door An Interview with Artist Jassmond Masters-Bell

July, 2018

 

Fairies. Gnomes. Greenman. The moon. And lots and lots of doors. Hundreds of original, intricately designed and brightly painted items are for sale at Fairy Behind the Door on Etsy.

It all happened by accident,” Jassmond Masters-Bell

said. “I just happened to see a small fairy door mold 10 years ago, and I bought it for myself just to have a little door in my garden I was establishing at the time. I love creating gardens and I was just looking for accessories to go into the garden. This was when the fairy garden explosion happened

When I molded it and it came out beautifully, I showed my first molded fairy door to my husband and he said. ‘Why don’t you make more and see if you can sell them?’”


She did and got rave reviews at a Ren Faire. She made more and put them on eBay.

They just went.”

Although Jassmond comes from an artistic family, working long days in broadcasting – sometimes 100-hour weeks – left her no time for artistic endeavors, but the doors continued to captivate her and so she began making them at home between shifts of her daily job.

It was a very messy procedure,” she said of working with concrete and having dust all around the house all the time.

When the broadcasting company employing Jassmond folded in 2010, she wanted to continue working in the magical fairy world. Moving from Maryland to Colorado’s Rocky Mountains allowed her to have a workshop where she could fully concentrate on more of her own designs and whimsical ideas, finding a pathway to a new career.


When I am in my workshop, I can get locked away down there for hours on end in my own little area … and hope my brain will create something wonderful,” Jassmond said, adding only her cats are allowed in.

Through the years she tried various compounds until recently finding PermaStone.

It’s a beautiful thing to work with. It’s crack and frost resistant. It lasts. It’s soft and light,” she said.

The process is involved. She sculpts an item from clay that must be dried slowly over several days. Layers of latex are applied to make the mold that is then filled with a concrete mix or stone compound, painted in vibrant detail and sealed to withstand the elements.

Each product has a little story that gives it some fantasy as well as a personality.

I’m very fussy about my work. It doesn’t go out unless I’m absolutely positively sure this is what I want to represent me.”


The description for one weathered blue door reads, “This Fairy door belongs to Mrs Odina. She owns a Nights Fairy dormitory where she allows the traveling fairy to stop by and sleepover before they continue on their journey. She runs a tight tree house, her fees are fair but you have to bring your own berries and goats milk for breakfast. It says on the Door ‘Fairies Sleeping’ so be quiet when you pass by.”

Not all doors open to fairy abodes. Take the purple Wibble door. It belongs “to the tiny Wibble people that live among the fae. They are very strange, cute but rarely seen. They usually are the ones that go hunting for ‘Ambergris’ mushrooms so that they can cultivate them and sell their perfume to the Fairies.”

Jassmond said, “I love writing. I want to put what each symbol actually means. I want it to be very earth-like.”

Accessories she has designed allow customers to create their own magical spaces with a selection of windows, flower pots, trellises, mailboxes, lanterns, trees, mushrooms, watering cans, bird baths, pathways and fences.

From fairy doors, she moved onto other beloved objects such as dragon eggs and Buddha cats, which soon found themselves in saturated markets.

I don’t want my shop to look like somebody else’s. I want to be original, so that’s what I’m aiming for – to open up a range of things other people will not have. You get them by designing them yourself.

I look for things that people love all the time … like cats and dogs. People always want cats and dogs because cats and dogs are always part of the family. So I’m expanding my cat range at the moment,” she said of avoiding current fads.

She does commission work as well, such as creating an animal in remembrance of a beloved pet that died. While she likes dogs, she loves cats, and painting them is one of the tasks she most likes.

A commissioned piece Jassmond recently began working on – a large one-of-a-kind plaque for a high priestess – is moving her more into the pagan world where she is quite comfortable.


I have a lot of ideas and I really want to get those going” she said of making more pagan symbols.

I would like to bring back some of the old pagan symbols … Nature is not respected, I feel, in our culture. I would like to make people more aware that these symbols do actually mean something.” Customers have also been asking her to add them to her shop.

For instance, she said, “a lot of people think the pentagram is a witchcraft symbol. It’s not. It actually is a sign of protection, but a lot of people think it’s a sign of evil. I think by doing more of these symbols I really would like to educate people about what these really are.”

Jassmond was somewhat surprised that most of her customers are adults.

That’s the kick I get out of it – that it’s not just for kids. I get more adults approaching me for advice on how to create a fairy garden for all the family if not for themselves.”

Inventory is limited.

When I’m making something I try to make two or three. The reason why I do that is one year I made a door for a customer. I was packing it up and I dropped it. …Since that accident happened I always have a backup and that backup now becomes stock. I always try to have at least one.”

Everything is infused with her own love and magic, and customer reviews bear that out.

Items range from 1-14 inches and from $9.99-$110.00. Those in stock ship sooner than those requiring casting, painting and finishing. She welcomes custom work as well.

You can visit Jassmond Masters-Bell and see her work at her Etsy shop Fairy Behind the Door on her site:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/FairybehindtheDoor?ref=si_shop

Be sure to check out Jassmond’s Facebook Page at:

https://www.facebook.com/FAIRYBEHINDTHEDOOR/

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

The Bad Witch’s Guide

May, 2018

 

 

The Bad Witch’s Guide to Beltane

 

I love Beltane. The flowers are just blooming. The green is just covering the hedgerows. It also happens to be my wedding anniversary!

There are huge celebrations all over the place, though not nearby it’s just that this year I am craving something quieter. Something a bit more romantic and I can’t quite put my finger on it. One of the best things we ever did was to do the Hastings East hill drumming and dancing in the dawn. On a hill in the ruins of a castle overlooking the sea we watched the light, a sliver of silver light creep, and turn red, then gold.

I’ve never done anything like that before or since. We were all done and dusted by 5.30 a.m. It was magickal. There were Morris dancers dressed in white. Pagan folks in regalia. Folks walking their dogs and people to watching the people.

After some food and a really good nap it was time for the huge parade. More Morris dancers and figures dressed as green men and women and Horned Gods drummed and danced through the streets. Dabbing people with green sponges. It really felt timeless. It felt like the whole town was magickally awake. The whole county!

A lot of pagans I know do camps from about this time of year. Where I had been busy, camping is not an option for me right now. Yet the pull of the wild still draws me. There is something utterly pagan about my island this time of year. Just under the skin of it.

Formal Beltane rituals can seem a bit hetro-centric but at its core Beltane is about the warmth of attraction. About reception and giving of energy. It is, at its core a ritual about balancing energy and understanding; within and in the world around us. It is the internal anima and animus finding momentum to create. It is about harnessing rather than repressing our wildness and turning it into something alive, be it art or science or poetry or an offspring. It is about the power of being alive and being grateful. Grateful for another year, another sunrise, a new day. It is a celebration of life.

It is not about what is in your pants, or whom you want to have sex with (if you want to have sex). That is a very limited view of self, sex, gender and identity. It is about the ritual. The receiving of energy, the channelling of energy, the using of energy to create something new. Ritual is a dream language, a psychological and social tool for healing and re-balancing a group and the self. When we exclude ourselves from the group or ritual we lose out on much of its power and deeper understandings.

As with all things this is a celebration of life has a touch of death with it too. Within Beltane’s warmth is the chill tingle of Samhain’s death. Acknowledging life means accepting death too. This roots you into and puts you out of time. You can see and feel the echo of your actions. Of course the bonfire was made of bone as well as wood. The death in the life as well as the life in the death.

For the May-pole and ribbons are only half of Beltane. The other part is about cleansing, warding off disease and illness through the power of death and fire. Cattle were driven through the ashes of bonfires, or between two large fires to do just that. People would dance around the fires and even jump over them. It was about dousing the hearth fires and re-lighting them from a group, a community fire. It was about re-igniting the heart within the home and community. Within the home. Within the self. It is to be in the dark, to be outside the usual bounds of social norms and to return changed for the better.

I recommend, if you are lucky and privileged enough to have folks nearby, to have get some folks together dance naked around a bonfire with at dawn. If that is not your bag, go and find a high spot. Climb a hill or go to a bridge or ancient ruined castle in the dark. Stand and wait in the darkness facing the east. Drum if you can. Or just be in the silence. Light a candle, or a fire if you can too. Watch the sunrise. Dance if you can. Or just stretch. Be at the mercy of the weather. No-one is outside the circle of life and death. After all it is the impulses and desire and joys that make us fully human.

 

GoodGod!

May, 2017

Meet the Gods: Green Man

Greenman1

As pagans celebrate Beltane, the world is turning green, so it’s easy to understand why pagans turn to Green Man. He is the head or face seen in many forms, always made from or surrounded by leaves – sometimes with vines or branches coming from his mouth or ears.

His is found on pagan altars in the woods; on the walls of Christian churches in England, France and Germany; and in secular buildings.

Beltane celebrates life as spring reaches its peak. Earth energies are strong and bursting with potential. Fertility is abundant.

The Green Man, as the young Oak King also known as Jack-in-the-Green, falls in love and couples with the Maiden goddess, also called the Goddess of Spring, the May Queen and Flora. She becomes pregnant. Together, this God of Vegetation and Goddess of Spring become symbols of the sacred marriage, the coming together of earth and sky.

To honor Green Man is to live in harmony with nature. To celebrate him is to recognize the gifts of the earth. Just breathe, and know the oxygen made by trees and plants you are inhaling is a gift of magic from Green Man. Plants, leafy branches, acorns and a bowl of earth are among the symbols used to represent Green Man. Patchouli incense, and the essential oils of oak moss, sweet birch and cinnamon are also among his correspondences.

It was common in the days of old, to offer sacrifices to Green Man. That’s the reason I like that the large cement face I have of him has finger-like leaves that form a bowl into it I can place offerings, as well my desires. I also turn to him when I seek guidance to lead a life that respects sustainability. He is sustaining, offering renewal of spirit and body. You leave happy and lighter after spending time with him.

You can find him roaming the forest. Sometimes he is seen with horns. He’s the spirit of vegetation and his energy is in all that is green and grows. His wisdom is that of the wheel of the year. He is born at Yule, mates at Beltane, reaches his peak at the Summer Solstice, then sacrifices himself over three harvests to sustain us though the winter. The eternal cycle offers deep wisdom as well as change.

Greenman2

Lest you think there is only one Green Man, I wanted to show you the first Green Man to sit on my altar – a plastic barbaric figure. The witch who reintroduced me to the craft by way of the Goddess gave it to me. In addition to being green and a man, it represented the Celtic and Nordic mythology to which I was drawn.

May Green Man bless you with abundance.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

ThriftCrafting: Witching on a Budget

April, 2016

Green Man mask

Greenmanmask1

Merry meet.

Beltane celebrates life at the peak of spring. The earth is bursting with potential, passion, vitality, joy and fertility. Its when Flora, the May Queen falls in love with the young Oak King, also known as Jack-In-The-Green and the Green Man, and they consummate their union.

Greenmanmask2

During celebrations, you often see men wearing a mask of green leaves. They can be made of dyed leather, papier mache and clay. Elaborate ones can cost more than $200. To prepare for your ritual, consider making one for $4 from the dollar store – or for free if you have the materials on hand.

greenmanmask3

I started with a blank mask I picked up at a tag sale last summer for 25¢, but you can sometimes find them on sale at craft stores. I picked out three kinds of flowers each with different leaf shapes and some ivy at the dollar store. The ivy turned out to be too big, and was never used.

Remove the leaves and the plastic piece that shapes them around the stem. Cut most of them apart, but leave some together.

I used a glue gun to attach them, overlapping randomly chosen leaves until the entire mask was covered.

Thats all there is to it. It took less than half an hour, making it fast and easy as well as thrifty.

Greenmanmask4

 

 

Merry part.

And merry meet again.