imbolc

Imbolc Correspondences

February, 2014

February 1, 2

Other Names: Imbolg (im-molc)(em-bowl’g) (Celtic), Candlemas (Christian), Brigantia (Caledonii), Oimelc, Festival of Light, Brigid’s (Brid, Bride) Day, La Fheill, An Fheille Bride, Candelaria (Mexico), Chinese New Year, Disting-tid (Feb 14th, Teutonic), DisaBlot, Anagantios, Lupercalia/Lupercus (Strega), Groundhog Day, Valentines Day.

Animals & Mythical Beings: Firebird, dragon, groundhog, deer, burrowing animals, ewes, robin, sheep, lamb, other creatures waking from hibernation.

Gemstones: Amethyst, garnet, onyx, turquoise.
Incense/Oil: Jasmine, rosemary, frankincense, cinnamon, neroli, musk, olive, sweet pea, basil, myrrh, and wisteria, apricot, carnation.
Colors/Candles: Brown, pink, red, orange, white, lavender, pale yellow, silver.
Tools,Symbols, & Decorations: White flowers, marigolds, plum blossoms, daffodils, Brigid wheel, Brigid’s cross, candles, grain/seed for blessing, red candle in a cauldron full of earth, doll, Bride’s Bed; the Bride, broom, milk, birchwood, snowflakes, snow in a crystal container,evergreens, homemade besom of dried broom, orange candle annointed in oil (see above)can be used to sybolize the renewing energy of the Sun’s rebirth.
Goddesses: Virgin Goddess, Venus, Diana, Februa, Maiden, Child Goddess, Aradia, Athena, Inanna, Vesta, Gaia, Brigid, Selene(Greek), Branwen(Manx-Welsh).
Gods: Young Sun Gods, Pan, Cupid/Eros(Greco-Roman), Dumuzi(Sumerian).
Essence: Conception, initiation, insight, inspiration, creativity, mirth, renewal, dedication, breath of life, life-path, wise counsel, plan, prepare.
Meaning: First stirring of Mother Earth, lambing, growth of the Sun God, the middle of winter.
Purpose: Honoring the Virgin Goddess, festival of the Maiden/Light.
Rituals & Magicks: Cleansing; purification, renewal, creative inspiration, purification, initiation, candle work, house & temple blessings, welcoming Brigid, feast of milk & bread.
Customs: Lighting candles, seeking omens of Spring, storytelling, cleaning house, bonfires, indoor planting, stone collecting, candle kept burning dusk till dawn; hearth re-lighting.
Foods: Dairy, spicy foods, raisins, pumpkin, sesame & sunflower seeds, poppyseed bread/cake, honey cake, pancakes, waffles, herbal tea.
Herbs: Angelica, basil, bay, benzoin, celandine, clover, heather, myrrh, all yellow flowers, willow.
Element: Earth
Gender: Female
Threshold: Midnight

The Witch’s Cupboard

February, 2014

Blessed Imbolc!

Blessed 300x209 The Witchs Cupboard

Pathworking for Imbolc includes some of the following:

*    Go for a holiday walk.  It can be short or long, whichever you like.  See if you can feel the impending season.  Imagine, as you walk, what activities are occurring under the soil.

*    Clean house.  Physically first, then psychically, magically.

*    Make a list of things you would like to plant in yourself, and keep the list in a place you will remember.  Add to it between now and Ostara, whenever the mood strikes you.

*    Light candles for yourself and your loved ones, saying prayers and sending them light ad color symbolizing that which they most need or want to come into their lives.

*    Make some candles.  One can make hand-rolled ones from sheets of beeswax (they’re easy and quite beautiful), poured candles (this requires a mold—see what kinds of molds you can make from inexpensive items around the house), or you can ever try hand-dipping some.  You will need to heat your wax in a deep vessel—I suggest a large coffee can, and have another can nearby with very cold, or even iced water.  You will start with only a string of wick, perhaps a foot and a half long, divided in half.  Dip both ends in the wax a few times, then dip them into the cold water to set the wax.  Be sure to keep the ends from sticking together.  Repeat the above (it will take some time), until they look right to you.   Remember to dip in and out of the wax quickly, or you’ll melt off what you’ve just dipped.

*    See your healers, and give your body a “tune-up.”  You’ll feel better, more energetic, more able to let in the light and energy that is growing so rapidly this time of year.

*    Purchase some small (I call the “seed”) crystals, and think of what you will program into them, so that you will be ready to “plant” them at Ostara.

One of my favorite activities is to plant seeds that will be open by Ostara.  Take a container of soil and perhaps some Nasturtium seeds, 9 in all (which grow fast) and make a wish with each seed you plant.  A wish for the upcoming Spring Equinox.  Once the seeds have germinated keep in a sunny window and watch them grow, then blossom.  Nasturtiums are edible so come Ostara you can throw them into a nice garden salad. 

Here’s some information on Nasturtiums:

Flowers 300x287 The Witchs Cupboard

The entire plant is edible…leaves, flowers, stems, seeds, and all. I consider nasturtiums a spicy green, and grow them in my garden as such. Add the leaves and flowers to any green salad, stuff the blossoms with an herb cream cheese, or chop them and add to pastas for a delicious addition to any meal. During the mid 20th century, people used nasturtium seed pods as a replacement for pepper. We can still do this today! All you have to do is wait for the seeds to dry and then grind them in a coffee grinder (I have one that I use specifically for herbs). Note: Make a yummy herbal seasoning salt by adding ground nasturtium seeds with other dried kitchen herbs from the garden.

Nasturtiums are nutritionally dense, as their leaves contain significant levels of vitamin C and iron. Medicinally they are known to be useful in breaking up congestion of the respiratory system and they provide excellent relief from colds. Likewise, nasturtium is said to encourage the formation of blood cells and can be given as a blood purifier and detoxifier. When preparing for a harvest, remember to choose fresh leaves and flowers that show no sign of browning or withering.

Pair Nasturtiums with other edible early spring flowers such as Violets, Pansies and Cover tops for the ultimate in edible flower salads!

Salad 300x200 The Witchs Cupboard

Nelland Living

February, 2014

Magical soft smoothies for Imbolc

Pamper yourself with these healthy treats, and feel the difference! Become more energetic and loaded with positivity. Get “high” on health!

Nel11 224x300 Nelland Living

 

 

There is true magic in these delicious smoothies. They ooze an amazing, happy vibe, that will take over you! Try starting by one a day.
The recipes are mild-tasting and require only common ingredients. They are all vegan (thus cholesterol-free) and mostly raw.

Nel21 300x225 Nelland Living

 

 

Soft Strawberry Smoothie (yields 1):

1/2 cup strawberries (fresh or frozen)
1 sweet apple
1 banana
1 cup soymilk

+ Throw all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend until super-smooth. (Add soymilk if needed.)

 

Nel31 300x225 Nelland Living

 

 

Magical Carrot Cake Smoothie (yields 1):

2 carrots (peeled to remove bitterness)
1 apple
a handful of almonds
1/2 lemon, zest of
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/2 – 1 tsp ground vanilla
(raw honey, if you like it sweeter)

water (as needed)

+ Blend until totally smooth.

 

Nel41 300x225 Nelland Living

 

 

Healthy Zatziki Smoothie (yields 1):

15 cm piece of cucumber (with peel)
1/2 small zucchini
a handful of sunflower seeds
1/2 avocado
1/2 clove garlic
1 tsp dried dill
seasalt, to taste
water (as/if needed)
+ Blend everything in a blender until creamy. Check for salt.
  Savory smoothies are a new thing for me, and I´d rather call them soups really. My Zatziki smoothie is an easy starting point to blended soups, because the taste is something most of us are familiar with already. So don´t hesitate to try.
  I like my smoothies quite thick, so they are more filling. Often I have a smoothie for breakfast, and sometimes also for lunch.

There are as many recipes as there are ingredients in your fridge. So once you get the hang of it, feel liberated to try out wild combinations!

Happy and healthy Imbolc to all!

 

Musings of a Massachusetts Witch

February, 2014

Perpetual Flame

 

Born yellow, orange and red I was

to this wooden limb

to this oak dweller

but in the sacred grove, wise as a tree,

silently walks our caretaker,

tending her duty

though between solstice and equinox, fall it now

was birthed in times of long ago.

 

Now my entire intention’s to purify

Kildare’s sentient beings worth protecting

from pestilence, vermin, and imps

that no individual petition

would overcome

clever maliciousness manifested in darkness, each attack

unmade, undone – swathed in my embrace.

 

Wise one, revered Lady

of Imbolc we offer bannock and drink;

showered by your kindness

we raise goblets abundantly flowing with ewe’s milk:

Sweet sister, stay

not of weariness or hunger, but linger

lay in this bed; bless us, bless us.

Musings of a Hereditary Witch

February, 2014

The Need Fire of Imbolc/Brighid’s Fire

In ancient Ireland, all hearth fires would be extinguished and laid with fresh logs on Imbolc. A community fire would be built and presided over by the community leaders, most often Chieftains of the tribe. The fire represents the purification from the winter energy and a blessing from Brighid.

A young girl would be chosen to light a torch from the fire. In a procession, she would then go house to house with her torch. She would be welcomed in and praised as the embodiment of Brighid. The girl would then light the hearth fire and offer a blessing to the household.

On Imbolc morning I extinguish all fires in my home, from the gas heater (turning off the gas of course) to shutting off the breakers for the electricity.  Going out onto my patio, I take the Yule greenery, some juniper berries, candle for Brighid, bowl of sand, my flint and steal. On a stone paver, I pile a small amount of soft starter material like dried moss, lint, anything soft that will catch a spark. Next, I set up a simple ritual space and ask Brighid for her blessing and to grant me patience. Working with flint and steal isn’t always easy.

Taking the flint and steal, I begin striking them together, hoping to get one of the sparks to catch in the starter material. Once I get a spark to catch and a thin ribbon of smoke to rise, I blow gently on the spark, attempting to coax a flame from the ember. This doesn’t always work on the first try, hence asking for patience. When a small flame does catch, I slowly begin adding a few sprigs of left over Yule greenery, some juniper berries, a few twigs and leaves, until I have nice little fire going.

I meditate on what the fire represents to me: warmth, creativity, inspiration, light, life. There is something about the act of creating the Need Fire that speaks to a deeper part of my spirit. When I am ready, I light the candle from the fire. Then I extinguish the fire, by smothering it with sand. I leave everything to cool and open my ritual space.

Next, I take the candle inside and re-light the pilot lights (ok, I light a match from the candle and re-light the pilot light). Then I take the candle with me to the breaker box and hold it in front of each breaker switch as I turn them back on.

When I am through, I place the candle to my altar where it will sit burning all day. If the candle should burn too quickly, I will move the flame to another candle so it can continue to burn. All of my candles for my Imbolc ritual will be light from this Need Fire candle.

I would love to hear from anyone else who does this or if you do something similar for the fires of Imbolc.

Happy Imbolc/Brighid’s Fire

Note: You can purchase a flint & steel kit at a sporting goods store or just about anywhere they sell camping supplies. If you cannot find one, you can use a magnifying glass and hope for a sunny day.

Goddesses of Sorcery

February, 2014

Brighid of the Augery

                Imbolc is coming and many Wiccans honour the Goddess Brighid on this Sacred Day. Brighid is a central figure in the Celtic mythos and one of the world’s most beloved Goddesses. She crosses cultures and faiths from Christianity to Paganism. In Catholicism she is still prayed to as St. Brigit of Kildare (b.451-d.523), although she was one of the “Saints” removed from the Catholic calendar in the 1960s. In the 8th century Cormac mac Cuilennain, the king-bishop of Munster in Ireland compiled the first linguistic dictionary on any non-classical languages of Europe on Irish words. This is part of his entry on Brighid.(1)

Brighid—a poetess, daughter of the Dagda. She is the female sage, woman of wisdom, or Brighid            the Goddess whom poets venerated and thus called ‘Goddess of Poets’. Her sisters were Brighid    the female physician and Brighid the female smith. Among all Irishmen, a goddess was called         ‘Brighid’. Her name comes from breo-aigit or ‘fiery arrow’.

Cormac is recording the information of Brighid of the Tuatha de Danann who was venerated throughout the Celtic world. She was called Brigantia in Britain, St. Brigit of Kildare, St. Ffraid in Wales and St. Bride in Scotland. According to John and Caitlin Matthews (2) Cormac’s etymology of Brighid’s name is  incorrect however and they say that the name Brighid comes from the Sanskrit word brahti meaning ‘high one’. There are so many stories about Brighid it almost seems as if she is an immortal travelling through time!

The divination method or augery known as the frith is attributed to her and the way it comes about is very strange!  In this myth about Brighid, that many Pagans are unaware of, she is attributed as being the midwife that helped at the birth of Christ. In this story she becomes the companion of the Virgin Mary and when boy Jesus was missing for three days she uses the frith to find him in the temple.

The augury which Brigit made for her Foster-Son

She made a pipe of her palms:

‘I see the Foster-Son by the side of the well,

Teaching the people without doubt.’

The frith was used by many Irish seers, called also frithirs by curling their hands into a ‘seeing tube’ and using Shamanic vision to find lost people or animals or to see the health of people by distance. Sometimes the frithir also carried  a divinatory stone called a ‘little stone of the quests’ made of red quartz. The usual method used by the frithir was to fast on the first Monday of the quarter at sunrise, with bare hands and feet to divine what events would come for that quarter. He or she would say special prayers to Mary and Brigit and walk clockwise around the hearth three times. Then with his eyes covered would walk to the threshold of the house and uncover his eyes, make a tube of his hands and look through them noting carefully what he saw. The things he saw would be the omens of the frith and would be interpreted for meaning much like dream symbols are.

Some common symbols from the frith are:

-a man or beast rising up is lucky and means improving health

-a man or beast lying down means ill health or death

-approaching birds mean news is coming

-a raven indicates death

Imbolc is considered to be the first quarter-day of the pagan Irish year, which marked the beginning of spring. So the frith would be performed this year on the first Monday after Imbolc which would be Monday February 3rd.

A modern version would be to wake up just before sunrise and without eating or drinking, with your feet bare, walk clockwise around your kitchen 3 times chanting Brighid’s name and asking her for guidance. Then go to the front door of your house (or window to outside if you live in an apartment), close your eyes, open the door (or window) and place both hands on either side of the door. Take some deep breaths and firmly state your intention. Now make a circle with your thumb and index finger to look through or alternatively a ‘tube’ with both hands curled up one behind the other as if making a telescope with your hands. Now place the ‘tube’ over your left eye and scan outside from left to right taking note of all you see. Especially take note of the movement of what is outside, is it towards you, away from you, from left to right, north to south etc. After you have looked at everything come back inside and write it all down. If you are unable to decide what these symbols mean, dream interpretation books can be of help to you.

Brighid is the Goddess of inspiration so you may be surprised by the clarity and understanding that you have of these symbols! I wish all the readers Happy Imbolc and the blessings of Brighid to you!

May Brighid’s flame strengthen you

May Brighid’s shield protect you

May Brighid’s mantle enfold you to keep you warm!

Blessed Be!

References:

1.Cormac’s Glossary on Line: https://ia600306.us.archive.org/10/items/threeirishglossa00cormuoft/threeirishglossa00cormuoft

2. John and Caitlin Matthews, The Encyclopedia of Celtic Wisdom, Element Ltd., 1994.

Signposts

February, 2014

Imbolc and New Beginnings
Following the Sabbats is one of my favorite parts of being Pagan.   I like marking the change of the seasons.  I like the different ways we welcome the changes, whether simply updating the colors around our house or just focusing on something different in our lives.
As cold as this winter has been, I’m really looking forward to Imbolc.

While nothing beats the picturesque views of snow falling outside while a fire roars in the fireplace, my home is in Texas.  I like warmer temperatures.   Like may not be the right word – I need the warmth.  For me Imbolc is the first sign that warmer temperatures and greener landscapes are quickly approaching.   They simply can’t arrive fast enough.

It’s also a time for new beginnings – for figuratively planting seeds in our lives.   The seeds aren’t always new – sometimes they are just old ones that we’ve forgotten, or ones that we’ve let life keep us from nurturing along.  Like everyone else, my life gets pretty busy – busy enough that I sometimes forget the seeds I’ve planted and suddenly realize another year has come and gone.

So this year I’m using Imbolc as a starting point for some things and a do-over for others.  Not so much ‘resolutions’, as much as intentions.

I’m going to try to move further into my practice.  I’ve spent the last few years learning about my path – reading, journaling, and talking with others – but not as much time actually practicing it, living it.  I feel like I’ve been watching from the outside more often than not – learning, but rarely using what I’ve learned.  It’s time I took more steps into the pool.  I’m going to start small with a simple ritual to honor Brighid and go through my intentions and take it from there.

I’m also going to start enjoying the seasons I spend so much time preparing for.  I got so caught up in running around preparing over the winter holidays that I forgot to enjoy them.  So, starting with Imbolc, I’m going to slow down a little.  I’m going to spend more time doing those things I enjoy.  I think I say that every year – we’ll see how that goes.

As much as I can’t wait to move past the cold, I know that towards the end of the summer I’ll be wanting the cool weather back.  And, right on queue, Lughnasadh will be here, reminding me that Fall is on it’s way.  The signpost for me is that the Sabbats and the changing seasons are opportunities to take inventory of our lives and where we are on our path.  We can make adjustments, reaffirm our intentions, or just let some things go.

How do you celebrate Imbolc?  Planting any seeds in your life?  Are you ready to shed the cold weather for warmer temperatures, or do you cling to the cold as long as possible before the heat index skyrockets?

Red Pixie’s Elements of a Magickal Life

February, 2013

Imbolc

This holiday is also known as Candlemas, or Brigid’s Day. One of the four Celtic “Fire Festivals. Commemorates the changing of the Goddess from the Crone to the Maiden. Celebrates the first signs of Spring. Also called “Imbolc” (the old Celtic name).

 

This is the seasonal change where the first signs of spring and the return of the sun are really noticed, i.e. the first sprouting of leaves, the sprouting of the flowers etc. In other words, it is the festival commemorating the successful passing of winter and the beginning of the agricultural year. This Festival also marks the transition point of the threefold Goddess energies from those of Crone to Maiden.

 

It is the day that we celebrate the passing of Winter and make way for Spring , it is also a day of celebrating the Celtic Goddess Brigid, who is the Goddess of poetry, Healing, Smithcraft, and Midwifery. If you can make it with your hands, Brigid rules it. She is a triple Goddess, so we honour her in all her aspects. This is a time for communing with her, and tending the lighting of her sacred flame. At this time of year, light multiple candles, white for Brigid, for the god usually yellow or red, to remind us of the passing of winter and the entrance into spring, the time of the Sun.

 

This is a Sabbat of purification after the Winter, through the renewing power of the Sun. It is also a festival of light and of fertility, once marked in Europe with huge blazes, torches and fire in every form. Fire represents our own illumination and inspiration as much as light and warmth. Imbolc is also known as Feast of Torches, Oimelc, Lupercalia, Feast of Pan, Snowdrop Festival, Feast of the Waxing Light, Brighid’s Day, and probably by many other names. It is traditional on Imbolc, at sunset or just after ritual, to light every lamp in the house – if only for a few moments. Or, light candles in each room in honour of the Sun’s rebirth. Alternately, light a kerosene lamp with a red chimney and place this in a prominent part of the home or in a window.

 

Foods appropriate to eat on this day include those from the dairy, since Imbolc marks the festival of calving. Sour cream dishes are fine. Spicy and full-bodied foods in honor of the Sun are equally attuned. Curries and all dishes made with peppers, onions, leeks, shallots, garlic or chives are appropriate. Spiced wines and dishes containing raisins – all foods symbolic of the Sun – are also traditional.

 

So whatever you are planning this Imbolc may the light shine brightly down on you, draw from the energy and fill you with blessings.  Let me know how you celebrate Imbolc.

 

Bright Blessings

 

Imbolc Correspondences

January, 2013

February 1, 2

Other Names: Imbolg (im-molc)(em-bowl’g) (Celtic), Candlemas (Christian), Brigantia (Caledonii), Oimelc, Festival of Light, Brigid’s (Brid, Bride) Day, La Fheill, An Fheille Bride, Candelaria (Mexico), Chinese New Year, Disting-tid (Feb 14th, Teutonic), DisaBlot, Anagantios, Lupercalia/Lupercus (Strega), Groundhog Day, Valentines Day.

Animals & Mythical Beings: Firebird, dragon, groundhog, deer, burrowing animals, ewes, robin, sheep, lamb, other creatures waking from hibernation.

Gemstones: Amethyst, garnet, onyx, turquoise.
Incense/Oil: Jasmine, rosemary, frankincense, cinnamon, neroli, musk, olive, sweet pea, basil, myrrh, and wisteria, apricot, carnation.
Colors/Candles: Brown, pink, red, orange, white, lavender, pale yellow, silver.
Tools,Symbols, & Decorations: White flowers, marigolds, plum blossoms, daffodils, Brigid wheel, Brigid’s cross, candles, grain/seed for blessing, red candle in a cauldron full of earth, doll, Bride’s Bed; the Bride, broom, milk, birchwood, snowflakes, snow in a crystal container,evergreens, homemade besom of dried broom, orange candle annointed in oil (see above)can be used to sybolize the renewing energy of the Sun’s rebirth.
Goddesses: Virgin Goddess, Venus, Diana, Februa, Maiden, Child Goddess, Aradia, Athena, Inanna, Vesta, Gaia, Brigid, Selene(Greek), Branwen(Manx-Welsh).
Gods: Young Sun Gods, Pan, Cupid/Eros(Greco-Roman), Dumuzi(Sumerian).
Essence: Conception, initiation, insight, inspiration, creativity, mirth, renewal, dedication, breath of life, life-path, wise counsel, plan, prepare.
Meaning: First stirring of Mother Earth, lambing, growth of the Sun God, the middle of winter.
Purpose: Honoring the Virgin Goddess, festival of the Maiden/Light.
Rituals & Magicks: Cleansing; purification, renewal, creative inspiration, purification, initiation, candle work, house & temple blessings, welcoming Brigid, feast of milk & bread.
Customs: Lighting candles, seeking omens of Spring, storytelling, cleaning house, bonfires, indoor planting, stone collecting, candle kept burning dusk till dawn; hearth re-lighting.
Foods: Dairy, spicy foods, raisins, pumpkin, sesame & sunflower seeds, poppy seed bread/cake, honey cake, pancakes, waffles, herbal tea.
Herbs: Angelica, basil, bay, benzoin, celandine, clover, heather, myrrh, all yellow flowers, willow.
Element: Earth
Gender: Female
Threshold: Midnight

Imbolc Correspondences

February, 2012

February 1, 2

Other Names: Imbolg (im-molc)(em-bowl’g) (Celtic), Candlemas (Christian), Brigantia (Caledonii), Oimelc, Festival of Light, Brigid’s (Brid, Bride) Day, La Fheill, An Fheille Bride, Candelaria (Mexico), Chinese New Year, Disting-tid (Feb 14th, Teutonic), DisaBlot, Anagantios, Lupercalia/Lupercus (Strega), Groundhog Day, Valentines Day.

Animals & Mythical Beings: Firebird, dragon, groundhog, deer, burrowing animals, ewes, robin, sheep, lamb, other creatures waking from hibernation.

Gemstones: Amethyst, garnet, onyx, turquoise.
Incense/Oil: Jasmine, rosemary, frankincense, cinnamon, neroli, musk, olive, sweet pea, basil, myrrh, and wisteria, apricot, carnation.
Colors/Candles: Brown, pink, red, orange, white, lavender, pale yellow, silver.
Tools,Symbols, & Decorations: White flowers, marigolds, plum blossoms, daffodils, Brigid wheel, Brigid’s cross, candles, grain/seed for blessing, red candle in a cauldron full of earth, doll, Bride’s Bed; the Bride, broom, milk, birchwood, snowflakes, snow in a crystal container,evergreens, homemade besom of dried broom, orange candle annointed in oil (see above)can be used to sybolize the renewing energy of the Sun’s rebirth.
Goddesses: Virgin Goddess, Venus, Diana, Februa, Maiden, Child Goddess, Aradia, Athena, Inanna, Vesta, Gaia, Brigid, Selene(Greek), Branwen(Manx-Welsh).
Gods: Young Sun Gods, Pan, Cupid/Eros(Greco-Roman), Dumuzi(Sumerian).
Essence: Conception, initiation, insight, inspiration, creativity, mirth, renewal, dedication, breath of life, life-path, wise counsel, plan, prepare.
Meaning: First stirring of Mother Earth, lambing, growth of the Sun God, the middle of winter.
Purpose: Honoring the Virgin Goddess, festival of the Maiden/Light.
Rituals & Magicks: Cleansing; purification, renewal, creative inspiration, purification, initiation, candle work, house & temple blessings, welcoming Brigid, feast of milk & bread.
Customs: Lighting candles, seeking omens of Spring, storytelling, cleaning house, bonfires, indoor planting, stone collecting, candle kept burning dusk till dawn; hearth re-lighting.
Foods: Dairy, spicy foods, raisins, pumpkin, sesame & sunflower seeds, poppyseed bread/cake, honey cake, pancakes, waffles, herbal tea.
Herbs: Angelica, basil, bay, benzoin, celandine, clover, heather, myrrh, all yellow flowers, willow.
Element: Earth
Gender: Female
Threshold: Midnight

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