morrigan

A Spring Equinox Ritual

March, 2019

Here are some words from a Spring Equinox Ritual performed between three witches with a focus on the Morrígan. You could speak the words on your own, or with a group, and you can decorate your sacred space with flowers or appropriate tools, depending on your path. I’ve left out any specific calls or hails, as you can add these as appropriate to your own beliefs. You will need an object or symbol that is important to you at this time of year, a seed, and a pot of soil (per person.)

Spirits of East, creatures of air
Light of the bright morning,
Venus on the horizon
Warm winds chasing chills
Birds singing, anticipating the coming spring.
Be with us now, when light meets dark as equals
And give us humour and grace
To celebrate the coming spring.

Spirits of South, creatures of fire
Heart of the mountain and breath of the volcano
From the centre of the earth to the core of the sun
Keep us alive through the vacuum of space.
Be with us now when light meets dark as equals
And give us inspiration and creativity
To dance into the coming Spring.

Spirits of West, creatures of water
Drop in the ocean and flood in the field
From the heart of the cloud to the blood in our veins
Filling us with dreams and emotion.
Be with us now when light meets dark as equals
And give us wisdom and insight
To flow onward into Spring.

Spirits of North, creatures of Earth
Ant crawling quickly; raven soaring by;
From the tallest mountain to each grain of soil
Grounding us so we can reach for the moon.
Be with us now when light meets dark as equals
And give us courage and strength
To build great things this spring.

Lady of light, Ceridwen stirring her cauldron
Silver web of the moon and golden disc of the returning sun
Remind us of warmth, love and laughter
And the earth coming alive beneath our feet.
As you hear your lover call,
May you also hear the words and deeds
We perform tonight
At this time of equal dark and light.

Great Lord of the Land, Cernunnos the hunter
The thrill of the chase and the pumping blood in the vein
Remind us of challenge, growth and rebirth
And the green returning like an awakening spell.
As you hear your Lady call,
May you also hear the words and deeds
We perform tonight
At this time of equal dark and light.

And to you, spirits unseen
Ancestors from behind the veil
Loved ones from our time and others
And the great woman who binds us all
The heart of the crow
The soul of the Warrior
The mind of the mystic;
Morrigan, wise lady,
Shed your aspect of Crone and join us
As Light meets Dark as Equals.

We gather today at this moment of reflection
The pause in the planet turning
The moment when all suddenly stills
And the greatest magic becomes possible.
You have a symbol that you have chosen for this rite.
Look at the symbol.

What does it mean to you? (a minutes meditation on the chosen object/symbol)
Now speak, and tell us how this object resonates with you.

Each person (or just you, if performing solo) takes a turn speaking about the object they chose; this can be as simple as how it made them feel, or something they want for the coming season, or simply a memory it evoked.

As one, we have spoken our innermost thoughts
As one, we stand now, as we will stand throughout the year
As the sun returns, and we feel the warm hands of Lugh
Kind upon our faces,
Let us remember that we all stand as a little sun
To those in need of warmth.

As a circle, we are un-ending
As a loop, we flow and turn
Now balanced, at this point of equinox, we can move forward or backward.
Let us choose the onward path
Where flowers grow and great trees house the owls
And beauteous nature holds court.
We now choose one thing we wish to nourish throughout this planting season
And we will speak of this again at Beltane,
When Fire reigns and the veil is thin.

Everyone takes a seed and places it in a pot, thinking of that which they wish to grow/nourish/change for the better over the weeks leading up to Beltane. The idea is that the seed will sprout to represent the progress made. We share bread and mead at this point, but do whatever is right for you on your path, or with your tribe.

Every drop of rain
Tickles and delights
Every gasp of air
Fire reignites
Earthed in loam and clay
Reaching for the sky
Sea to East and West
Spirit soaring high
Spring has come again
Shoots burst from the soil
Feeding souls and hearts
With play and merry toil.

Dismiss and say farewell to the elements, the deities, and spirits of place in which ever way is appropriate. Stand in the energy of your sacred space and breathe in the promise of the coming spring.

***

About the Author:

Mabh Savage is a Pagan author, poet and musician, as well as a freelance journalist.

She is the author of A Modern Celt: Seeking the Ancestorsand Pagan Portals – Celtic Witchcraft: Modern Witchcraft Meets Celtic Ways.

A Modern Celt: Seeking the Ancestors on Amazon

Pagan Portals – Celtic Witchcraft: Modern Witchcraft Meets Celtic Ways on Amazon

GoodGod!

May, 2018

Meet the Gods: Dagda

(This illustration of Dagda was found on Pinterest. His cauldron, known as the Undry or the Cauldron of Plenty, provided infinite food and drink but never to a coward or an oath breaker. It was also said to revive the dead. One end of his enormous club could kill while the other end could give life.)

 

Merry meet.

The name of the Celtic god Dagda means “Good God.” He’s also known as Eochaid Ollathair, meaning “Eochaid the All-Father.” His name is typically proceeded by the article “the.”

In the Celtic tradition, the Dagda is one of the leaders of a mythological Irish people, the Tuatha Dé Danann, “People of the Goddess Danu.”

These were a group of people, descended from Nemed, who had been exiled from Ireland, and scattered. It is thought that Danu offered them her patronage, under which they succeeded in rebanding, learning new and magical skills, and returning to Ireland in a magical mist,” according to Bard Mythologies.

Britannica.com states, “The Dagda was credited with many powers and possessed a cauldron that was never empty, fruit trees that were never barren, and two pigs – one live and the other perpetually roasting. He also had a huge club that had the power both to kill men and to restore them to life. With his harp, which played by itself, he summoned the seasons.”

Some sources have him married to the sinister war goddess Morrígan. At least one of his many children was borne by the goddess of the River Boyne.

The Dagda is generally described as being a large man, sometimes comically so, with a tremendous appetite and immense capacity. It was said that to make his porridge he needed 80 gallons of milk as well as several whole sheep, pigs, and goats, and that he ate this meal with a ladle large enough to hold two people lying down,” Morgan Daimler wrote in “Pagan Portals – Gods & Goddess of Ireland,” citing “A Child’s Eye View of Irish Paganism,” by Blackbird O’Connell.

 

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Daimler notes the Dagda is often described as having red hair and wearing a short tunic. He is strong and able to accomplish “great feats such building a fort single-handedly.” Every power was his.

He is called the Excellent God, the Lord of Perfect Knowledge and all Father. His central attribute is the Sacred Fire and, like it, he is always hungry, ready to consume the offerings; he is also a red god. The Dagda is also a phallic deity [fitting for Beltane], his lust matching his hunger. He is the father of many of the Tuatha De but his key function is as Druid of the Gods,” according to an article published on adf.org.

Druidic magic, abundance and great skill are among the attributes associated with the Dagda.

From my research, it seems he would appreciate offerings of large quantities of dark ale or beer, and oat bannocks, a porridge, particularly if butter and bacon are added. One source noted they should be offered to the fire.

A cauldron and a club or staff, Daimler suggested, could be his symbols in works of magic.

He is called on for wisdom, victory in law or judgement, and bounty. In a time of need, I can see putting out my cauldron, perhaps with a fire in it, and call the Dagda and his Cauldron of Plenty for help. Because his cauldron also serves as a tool of rebirth and regeneration, I would also call upon that power when going through a difficult ending on the way to a rebirth.

(“Dagda – Celtic All Father,” was handcrafted by James Miller from Stonecrafts. Sculpted in wax based clay and cast in architectural concrete, this plaque is available on Etsy.)

 

James Miller, a sculptor from Colorado, is of Celtic and Germanic descent.

He is part of my cultural heritage, so I honor him as an archetype of the ideal masculine,” James said, adding, “His name actually means ‘the good one.’”

He finds people are more receptive to learning about gods, goddesses and ancient traditions when they are framed in a cultural rather than religious context.

Merry part. And merry meet again

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

Gems of the Goddess

September, 2011

Morrigan – FLYING QUEEN


When you see a crow or a raven, do you think of them as an omen or a message bringer?  Do you believe them unlucky or enchanting?

Crows and ravens are believed to have many meanings and interpretations.  Throughout history they have been known as creatures who can fly through the veil and back again, full of wisdom and power.

Naturally these mysterious beings would be in common contact with the intelligent Celtic Goddess Morrigan.  She has even been said to be one herself, flying over battle fields of war, and deciding the fate of the opposing side.  This made her claim the name of The Phantom Queen.

The Morrigan is one of the three daughters of Celtic Goddess Emmas and dates all the way back to the megalithic cult of the Mothers (Matrones, Idises, Dísir, and many more)   She was also known as the washer of the Ford, who rinsed the blood from warriors clothes after battle.  She has preformed many bold and outstanding acts throughout history, most of which are not known.  This Goddess pretty much does it all, making her very similar to Hecate in a sort of way.  She also helps with the cycle of birth and death.  She is the passageway to death and the passageway to birth, holding souls in her feathers to carry them where they need be.   She is a shape shifter and death itself, a dark association, but one that can be helpful and cleansing if approached with the right mindset.     

CONNECTING WITH MORRIGAN In ancient times, Morrigan’s followers would set out bowls of blood on their alters as an offering.  If this is not your thing, then feel free to set out a red cloth to symbolize the bloody clothing of the worriers.

Morrigan is a goddess to do some deep thinking with when you have a major decision to make.  She’s obviously very good at decisions since she decides the fate of people all the time.  Especially if your decision involves leaving something behind, or even making an internal decision about yourself.  She would encourage you to dive into the ugly black hole of things you don’t want to think about or things in your life that scare you.  We all have them, and they need to be dealt with in order to properly achieve our highest self.  This realm of darkness is a very normal thing to experience, and go through.  Just remember, Morrigan is here for anyone who asks, and you will, without a doubt, know she’s with you when she comes.

SYMBOLS AND THINGS TO PUT ON YOUR ALTER Mugwart, yew, black, red, crows, ravens, blood, feathers, apple, vervain, hawthorn trees, rosemary, thyme, moonstone, quartz