sasha fenton

Book Reviews – The Only Books You Will Ever Need: 3 Titles From the Plain & Simple Series

March, 2019

There is a series of books titled, “Plain & Simple, The Only Book You will Ever Need”. I have three of these that I would like to review together, in that they are part of a growing series.

The first one I will review is “Chakras, Plain & Simple” by Sasha Fenton.

The book begins with an introduction to the chakras, what they are, and how they work. From there, there is a chapter on each chakra with description, purpose, benefits of each when healthy and each includes an exercise for the specific chakra.

How to heal your chakra is next discussed, bringing them into balance using colors, crystals, oils, altars. The last two sections go beyond the 7 major chakras to the minor ones and a very short discussion on kundalini energy.

The next book is “Flower Essences, Plain & Simple,” by Linda Perry.

It follows the same formula, starting with what they are, how to choose them, feel their energies and how to make them. It describes how to use them with the chakras and the subtle bodies.

There is a small section referencing Dr. Edward Bach, found of Bach Flower Remedies, and then moves into a discussion of different essences including, but not limited to, rose, lavender, eucalyptus, and red geranium.

It ends with a glossary of essences and their uses, including how and when to use them.

We finish with “Herbs, Plain & Simple,” by Marlene Houghton.

Ms. Houghton starts us off with a history of herbalism, how it is used in healing and the use of a “green pharmacy”.

This is followed by a section on herbs for individual body systems, including, the immune system, digestive system, nervous system and more. It discusses what you would put in an herbal first aid kit, medicinal honeys, different herbal elixirs, including herbs for anti-aging, herbal teas and the comfort of herbal baths.

While I would not quite agree that these are the only books you will ever need on these subjects, I do agree that they are “Plain & Simple”, giving you the basic information you would need to know before deciding whether or not to delve further into any particular area of interest.

Chakras, Plain & Simple: The Only Book You’ll Ever Need on Amazon

Flower Essences Plain & Simple: The Only Book You’ll Ever Need on Amazon

Herbs Plain & Simple: The Only Book You’ll Ever Need (Plain & Simple Series) on Amazon

***

About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is MysticalShores@gmail.com

My Name is Isis on Amazon

Book Review & Contest – In Focus Astrology: Your Personal Guide by Sasha Fenton

September, 2018

In Focus Astrology: Your Personal Guide

by Sasha Fenton

© 2018 Zambezi Publishing LTD

Publisher Wellfleet Press

an imprint of Quarto Group

**(Keep reading for a chance to win a Free copy of In Focus Astrology: Your Personal Guide by Sasha Fenton this month in PaganPagesOrg thanks to the Quarto Group)**

Ms. Fenton wrote a book that is in a straightforward way. I found it engaging and not boringly technical.

I’ve read three other books on astrology by other authors. But, Ms. Fenton’s book is one that gives you the real bare bones of what it takes for you to become an astrologer. Some of the chapters that she covers are, signs of the zodiac, the rising sign and the ascendant, the planets, predictive techniques, and easy miscellany.

In the chapter what constitutes astrology, she gives two different websites, for you to try out. I tried both of these on my phone, which is a Samsung Galaxy S9 +, on Verizon carrier. I had a problem getting both of these to work on my phone. My husband was born in a small town in Illinois that is the same as the town in England; it kept wanting to pick the city in England on both apps. I then tried them on my Kindle Fire and my Lenovo TV – X103F. On both of those, the apps worked perfectly. So, you may have a little bit of an issue every once in a while using the phone.

Ms. Fenton picked up seven different famous people to show their natal charts. Two of them are notorious British gangsters. They are in fact twins; she wanted to show the similarities and differences in astrology when it comes to twins. I have to say it was exciting to read this. The other people that she picked are like Jimi Hendrix (the musician), JFK, the President of the United States, Tom Hanks (the actor), and a couple of others. She picked these people and their natal charts for different demonstrations in how to bring the chart together.

The way Ms. Fenton has this laid out, it makes sense without being overly technical. And I have to say it made it an easy read, compared to some of the other books. So, if you’re looking for something that short, concise, and to the point, I would suggest starting with this book in learning your first steps to astrology. I found it very enjoyable.

 

**Now… For your chance to win a Free copy of In Focus Astrology: Your Personal Guide by Sasha Fenton this month through PaganPagesOrg, thanks to the Quarto Group, visit PaganPagesOrg Instagram hit follow, find the picture promoting the contest of In Focus Astrology: Your Personal Guide by Sasha Fenton posted and leave a comment! That’s all!! A winner will be randomly chosen on Monday September 17, 2018.  USA & Canada Only.

 

In Focus Astrology: Your Personal Guide

 

***

About the Author:

Dawn Borries loves reading and was thrilled to become a Reviewer for PaganPages.Org. Dawn, also, has been doing Tarot and Numerology readings for the past 25 years. Dawn does readings on her Facebook page.  If you are interested in a reading you can reach her at: Readings by Dawn on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/Readings-by-Dawn-1608860142735781/

Book Review – Secrets of Chinese Divination: A Beginner’s Guide to 11 Oracle Systems by Sasha Fenton

April, 2018

Review of Sasha Fenton’s Secrets of Chinese divination: A Beginner’s Guide to 11 Oracle Systems

As readers of this column know, I have been a fan of Sasha Fenton’s for years so it was with great delight that I opened this new (to me) book about Chinese divination.

Just under an inch in thickness, this richly colored volume is filled with the wisdom of the ages. As Fenton explains in the first chapter, there are links between the various divinations – they share common ideas, such as the “root concepts” of Yin and Yang and the Five Elements (page 2). In addition to this, many of the major divination systems cross-reference each other in many ways. As I read the book, I would become confused and have to refer back to this or that chapter and refresh my memory – sometimes I would have to skip ahead to some other chapter to find some other reference! But as the Buddha said: “Confusion is good!”

The first divination system Fenton covers is the Ming Shu or what we know as Chinese Astrology. If you are aware that you are born in the year of the Horse or the year of the Rabbit, then you know a little about this complicated system. And it is complicated! If it was just a question of the year you were born and whether you were born in a Yang (Active) Year or Yin (Receptive) Year and the Element of your year – that would be enough. For instance, I was born in 1960 – that makes me an Active Metal Rat. In general, Rats are intelligent, tenacious, artistic and they hate to be rushed – much like the Taurus sign under which I am also born. A Metal Rat is “idealistic, deeply emotional, clever with money…they suffer from jealousy and envy.” (page 16) She continues to explore the influences of the elements. Metal Rat women are “very demanding. They pursue the man they fancy, and the guy must toe the line or suffer the consequences.” (page 52). And how!

Fenton says there are ways to forecast with Chinese Astrology, but again, it’s a different concept than how it’s done in the West. There are “Active” years, “Harmonious” years, and “Difficult” years, and these depend on the element of your sign as opposed to your animal. So as a Metal person, I am active in Metal year. My harmonious years are Earth and Waters years. Alas! This year, 2018, is a difficult year – it is a wood year! Fire years are also difficult for Metal people. But I would imagine that going through fire would make metal stronger, wouldn’t it? Like molten steel?

This chapter is filled with charts and lists, all designed to help the beginner diviner become adept at drawing up a horoscope for her- or himself or for anyone. If you take your time and read carefully, any confusion you may have will soon be gone.

The next chapter is about Face Reading. This was quite interesting. I liked the concept of the “Three Zones” of the face, as well as the “Thirteen Divisions”.

Each zone and each division of the face has a name and a meaning – as well as the eyes, the nose, the jaw, the ears, the forehead – every part of the face! I have admit, though – as I was reading this chapter – it seemed to me that much of the information here was medical in nature. The meaning of moles and brown spots on the skin and yellow eyes and so on. But – in the East as in the West – the witches in any village were the original doctors, so this makes sense. You’d find divination was often just medical advice.

Chapter Five is about Feng Shui, which I personally never thought was about divination. But if you want to create harmony and balance so that you are able to properly meditate and use your divinatory gifts, Feng Shui is all-important. One thing I read that I hadn’t heard before was: “a straight path that leads directly to the front door is simply asking for bad spirits to zoom in.” I had never thought of that before. This is not an issue where I now live but if it is an issue where you live, Fenton suggests breaking up the path with some tubs of plants that tumble over the path – anything that breaks up the straight line. (page 80).

The next chapter is about Hand Reading. Fenton reports that the Chinese categorize types of hands by element. Apparently, they also link it to the I-Ching, as seen by this diagram:

In her explanation of each section of the hand, she links back to Western hand interpretation but that really doesn’t make much sense to the reader, unless they’re already acquainted with Western Palmistry. Looking at the diagrams of both systems, I personally think the Chinese system is much simpler and easier to use.

Quite naturally, a chapter about the I-Ching follows the chapter about Hand Reading. I have written about the I-Ching before – it is one of my favorite methods of divination and I use it quite often. I throw pennies, as opposed to yarrow sticks (I always have pennies on hand). I like the simplicity of her explanations of the trigrams – I think I will be using this book as a reference the next time I throw the I-Ching.

Next comes a chapter called the Lunar Oracle. I am not sure at all if this is any use at all. But at the end she mentions that the Lunar Oracle “seems to show particularly strong links to the Tarot” although she personally “would opt for ancient Egypt” as the source of the Tarot (page 151). I have to add my own two cents – given the names of the days of the Oracle – they could easily be an influence for the Lenormand as well!

Chapter Nine is entitled Mah Jong Reading. As someone who has played numerous games of “Mah Jong Solitaire” on my I-Phone, I was instantly curious to know how Mah Jong could be used in a divinatory fashion. But of course – the tiles have suits, just like cards, and those suits have meaning. There are also “Honors” tiles – Winds, corresponding to the four directions, and Dragons, also four in number – and the Guardians – Flowers and Seasons – also four apiece. Like the Tarot, you think of a question as you shuffled the tiles and then you pick out thirteen tiles. You place them into a spread:

Naturally, each direction has a meaning and which tiles land on which direction determines the outcome of the reading.

This is really interesting and I am definitely going to look for a Mah Jong set so I can actually do a reading and report back to all of you about this.

The next divinatory system she reviews is called The Four Pillars of Destiny and she admits that it is so complicated that she didn’t think she could “only get it across in person” but she included it in the book because a book about Chinese divination wouldn’t be complete without it. (pages 169-70). I read through this chapter and I have to admit that it made absolutely no sense to me whatsoever. I knew what the basic concepts were about but that was IT. It made me think of that first day in calculus and opening up the text book and seeing all those numbers and letters and symbols and knowing that I knew what they were – because I’d had algebra and trig – but beyond that, I was lost. The Four Pillars of Destiny are just like that.

Lo Shu is a numerology system based on the magic square. It’s also known as the Nine Star Ki but apparently that name is Japanese.

Like so many of the Chinese divinatory systems, this looks easy at first but then it opens up into a roomful of mirrors and suddenly – it’s all confusion. I have to say – this chapter – like the Mah Jong chapter – deserves a posting all of its own. I am going to definitely look into finding out more about this system of divination. Just for my own edification! But of course – whatever I find out, I will share with you!

Weighing the Bones is something completely different. I am not even sure where the name comes from. It has nothing to do with bones or weight. You have to look up your date of birth – year, month, day and time – on a series of charts and then add up the corresponding numbers. Mine all added up to a “3” which meant “A life a hard work and much travel” (page 219). Well – I can’t argue with that!

The last chapter is called The Chien Tung: Yarrow Stick divination and I always thought that yarrow sticks were used for the I-Ching – you used yarrow sticks or you used coins. But although Fenton concedes that yarrow sticks are used in I-Ching divination, she says she would “like to take yarrow stick divination into a unique direction” – she suggests connecting Yarrow Stick divination and the Tarot. For this, of course, you have to have seventy-eight sticks, numbered 1 to 78, each one meaning a card of the Tarot. There’s a chart for the correspondences:

Personally, I think this is a stretch. Ok – on one hand, I admit it’s cool, connecting the two divinatory systems – but on the other hand, the whole point of Tarot cards are the pictures on the cards. What are you supposed to do here – imagine the picture? Or just be so adept at the Tarot that you just know the concept when you draw the yarrow stick or sticks? Honestly – it really doesn’t make all that much sense to me. But to each their own!

At the very end of the book, there is a glossary.

All in all, I think Secrets of Chinese divination: a Beginner’s Guide to 11 Ancient Oracle Systems is a very fine book and I am glad to own it. I plan to use it quite often and I guarantee you that some of the topics reviewed here today we will be revisiting in the near future!

Until next month, happy divining! Brightest Blessings!

Click Image for Amazon Information

References

Fenton, Sasha. Secrets of Chinese divination: A Beginner’s Guide to 11 Ancient Oracle Systems. Charlottesville, Hampton Roads Publishing Company, Inc., 2003, 2018.

***

About the Author:

Polly MacDavid lives in Buffalo, New York at the moment but that could easily change, since she is a gypsy at heart. Like a gypsy, she is attracted to the divinatory arts, as well as camp fires and dancing barefoot. She has three cats who all help her with her magic.

Her philosophy about religion and magic is that it must be thoroughly based in science and logic. She is Dianic Wiccan and she is solitary.

She blogs at silverapplequeen.wordpress.com. She writes about general life, politics and poetry. She is writing a novel about sex, drugs and recovery.