slavic

Review: 2019 Lunar & Seasonal Diary (Northern Hemisphere) by Stacey DeMarco

December, 2018

Review:

2019 Lunar & Seasonal Diary (Northern Hemisphere) by Stacey DeMarco

Rockpool Publishing

ISBN: 978-1-925682-13-7

List Price: $21.95 USD / £16.99 GBP

The 2019 Lunar and Seasonal Diary is a beautiful, spiral-bound calendar, richly illustrated with pleasing sepia color pages. As one would expect, it tracks the waxing and waning of the moon and the lunar eclipses of the coming year. It also provides the astrological house of each new and full moon and features the eight annual festivals of the wheel of the year.

I reviewed the Northern Hemisphere edition of the Seasonal Diary. Both Stacey DeMarco and Rockpool Publishing are based in Australia, which is why special care is made to tie the festivals to the seasons themselves instead of calendar dates. After all, our calendars follow the reality of the Earth and her seasons, not the other way around.

Especially well fitted to the new pagan, the diary has a well written introduction the hows and whys of spellcraft and the basics of working with crystals. The moon phases are introduced, as well as the elements, directions and the wheel of the year – not enough to complicate things, but enough guidance to use the daily and monthly prompts that follow. Each month features a specific deity, as well as an appropriate ritual or spell, drawing inspiration from traditions as varied as Slavic, Celtic, Hindu, Norse, Egyptian, Greek, and Shinto. I think the selection is broad enough to be interesting for almost any pagan.

I found the Lunar & Seasonal Diary a beautiful resource to keep me connected to the monthly rhythms of the earth. Each month begins with a page questioning “What am I devoted to?” – asking us to simultaneously reflect on what we have been wrapped up in the month just past as well as what we would aspire towards in the month ahead. Prompts are given for important dates and goals to focus on and manifest in the month ahead.

This monthly return to focus seems a positively recharging reset to our frame of reference, especially during those stressful times when we’re just happy to it through one calendar page to the next. It reminds us to recall what we are working for in the first place, reminding us that the daily grind is a process and not an end in itself. This monthly taking-stock can allow you to stay open to the living world around you, to stay fast with what is truly important to you, or to shift your focus and goals each month, working on different aspects of your life just as the energy of the earth changes through different phases around you.

With the space for taking notes, prompts for both reflective and aspirational record keeping, I think this is a great notebook for any pagan who sees the value of the occasional ritual to keep one in tune with the seasons, and it especially shines for those new to the pagan path.

2019 Lunar & Seasonal Diary: Northern Hemisphere on Amazon

GoodGod!

October, 2018

Meet the Gods: Chernobog

(“Day and Night (Belobog and Chernobog) by Maxim Sukharev)

Merry meet.

This time of the waning year is the time of the dark gods, who balance the gods of the light during the waxing year.

Slavic god Belobog is the “White God,” with his sunshine that brings life. He is prayed to for a plentiful harvest, and for a light that guides through dark times and places. Belobog appears only during daylight, wearing a white robe and holding a staff. He brings good things to those he meets.

Belobog’s brother is Chernobog, the equally powerful god of the dark who rules the night, and is associated with evil and devastation.

Twice each year the two brothers dueled, with the winner controlling the season along the length of the day and night.

The Black God survives in numerous Slavic curses and in a White God, whose aid is sought to obtain protection or mercy,” Evel Gasparini wrote in “Slavic religion” on britannica.com.

(“Creation of the Earth (Belobog and Chernobog)” by Maxim Sukharev)

Chernobog was associated with bleak attributes such as cold, famine, poverty and illness. Despite this, he is still respected among all the other gods,” Ivan wrote in “12 Gods Of Slavic Mythology And Their Amazing Powers” on ancient-code.com.

In that tradition, the dark was respected, as was the light, knowing it was necessary of cosmic balance, and knowing each year, they would find their way back to the light. These cycles of the universe were due to the polarizing actions of Chernobog and Belobog, Ivan wrote.

Egyptian brothers Set and Horus engage in a similar struggle between light and dark, providing a symbol of harmony. Set, the god of darkness, was associated with evil, deserts, wastelands and the northern stars; although he murdered his brother he was still seen as a protector and a source of strength. He was wild and untamed with bright red hair. Horus was depicted as a winged sun disk. He was the god of the east and of sunrise, and also the god associated with the sunset.

In other cultures, the Greek god of darkness was Erebos while Hodr was the Norse god of winter and darkness. Known for murdering his brother, Set was the Egyptian god of darkness and evil. According to anglefire.com, “Itzcolihuqui was the Atzec demon god of darkness, deep freeze, volcanoes and disaster.”

As the darkness grows, working with these gods can offer strength and power.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

July, 2017

Kupala

(Photo Credit: holladaypaganism.com)
Kupala, whose name means “to bathe” is a Slavic mid-summer Goddess. She is known as a Goddess of Springs and Water.

Her worshippers bathed in local rivers and collected dew each morning in June. The waters had been blessed by Kupala and had healing and purification powers, which also makes Her a Goddess of Healing.

She is also a Goddess of Fire, with it’s purifying and protective qualities. At Her annual mid-summer festival, young men and women would jump over a purifying bonfire, dragging a straw maiden along with them.

(Photo Credit: meettheslavs.com)

This image was garlanded with flowers and dressed in a beautiful gown. The straw maiden was then hung in a birch tree, which had been cut ritually, having all of its’ upper branches trimmed. This ritual was only done by women. Men could not touch either the figure, or the tree.

The straw maiden was then released to the water and drifted away. As she floated away, Kupala removed all evil energies from the village.

Kupala, as a Goddess of water personifies the magic inherent in water, and she is also known by the name of Water Mother.

Offerings of flowers and plants, especially purple loosestrife and fern, which were sacred to Her, were often left as offerings at the river. Ferns are also called “the fire flame of Kupala”, and the roots of purple loosestrife banished both bad dreams and demons, but needed to be gathered at dawn on mid-summer.


(Photo Credit: blog.slavicsouvenirs.com)
As the summer unfolds, may you be blessed many times by Kupala and Her healing and purifying waters.
)O(