sun

Wreathing the Wheel

December, 2018

As an eclectic witch, one of the most transformative practices that I’ve adopted is the practice of setting intention. At its root, intention is a really basic method of manifestation: make a plan, then execute the plan. But as I’ve explored the idea of intention over time, I’ve come to see a beautiful effect that results from the ongoing process of self-examination. It’s not just the external result of manifesting my dreams, but a reminder to check in with myself and make sure I’m on the right path. After all, if I can’t answer the question, “What’s my intention in doing this?” for any given action I am taking… then why am I even doing it?

It is in the spirit of setting intentions, and thoroughly understanding those intentions, that I started bullet journaling. While I keep a separate grimoire (and have kept other books of shadows), my bullet journal is the place where my magical life intersects with my daily life, and I put some of the spiritual concepts that I’m working with into practice. In this monthly column, I’ll be exploring various methods for working craft into bullet journaling to help track astrological transits, green ally work, Tarot journaling, celebrating the Wheel of the Year, working with associations, artistic exploration, and more.

 

Monthly Spread for December

 

 

I like to illuminate my monthly spreads with images of plants that are associated with the nearest major sabbat, and the season in general. I gravitate towards plants and natural objects that are native to my own area, as a way to bring the outside in. So for December, the plants that I chose to draw in my journal were pine, ivy, and holly. I like to use the information in Llewellyn’s Complete Book of as a jumping-off point to get started with these associations, but it’s good to remember that associations aren’t set in stone, and can easily be changed to accommodate your own hemisphere and biome.

The next thing that I do when building my monthly spread is add the phases of the moon and the full moon’s name. I also record each month’s Tarot card, which I drew in my whole-year reading at the beginning of the year, so that I can reflect on the role that this card plays in my life and how it fits in with other themes and experiences that I’ve encountered during the year. In keeping with the occult tradition of associating moon values with the left side of the body and sun values with the right side, I track the astrological transits of the sun and moon through the month, with the moon transits in the lower-left corner of each day, and the sun in the lower-right corner. This December, the winter solstice falls on the day before the full moon; at the same time, the sun enters Capricorn, and the moon enters Cancer. The darkest night of 2018 will be filled up with the light of the full moon.

I’m calling this column “Wreathing the Wheel” in an effort to remind myself that this project is about more than just to-do lists and chores. Instead, it’s an opportunity for me to acquaint myself intimately with the cycles of nature, immerse myself in intentional thinking, record and study associations, and deepen my divination practices. This is a bit like the process of making a wreath: you find a solid base, and then weave together plant allies, ribbons, and baubles until you’ve got something that looks alright. While I realize that not everyone is as artistically inclined as I am, I would encourage any journaler to embrace the creative side of bullet journaling, not to impress anyone, but as a way to celebrate the passing of time, allow awareness to manifest as creation, and decorate the days that we’re given.

***

About the Author:

Sarah McMenomy is an artist and witch. Her craft incorporates herbalism, spellwork, trance, divination, auras, and more. Her work can be found at https://sarahmcmenomy.tumblr.com

GoodGod!

December, 2018

Meet the Gods: Mithras, the Pagan Christ Child

 

(This figure of the Persian god Mithras is at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C.)

 

Merry meet.

Mithras, god of the sun in ancient Rome, was born around the winter solstice and experienced a resurrection around the spring equinox. The ancient Persian-Roman religion called Mithraism thrived before Christianity, dating back some 4,000 years. It gains attention because the similarities between his story and that of Jesus are numerous.

He was born of the virgin Anahita on December 25. He was, according to an article on truthbeknown. com by Acharya S. and D.M. Murdock, “wrapped in swaddling clothes, placed in a manger and attended by shepherds.”

He traveled far and wide as a teacher and a master who performed miracles and had 12 companions. He was omniscient. Both the lion and the lamb were his symbols. Hundreds of years before the birth of Jesus, the Lord’s Day, or Sunday, was said to be Mithras’ sacred day. Baptisms were important, midnight services were held and he was often said to carry a lamb on his shoulders. Mithraism’s scared rock was Petra.

As the ‘great bull of the Sun,’ Mithra sacrificed himself for world peace. He ascended into heaven. Mithra was viewed as the Good Shepherd, the ‘Way, the Truth and the Light,’ the Redeemer, the Savior, the Messiah,” according to the article.

Mithra was worshiped as Mitra or Itu in the Indian Vedic religion. It is believed he was born in a cave on December 25 and was the mediator between man and god.

 

(In this relief from the 2nd century AD, Mithras kills the sacred bull and from its blood and semen arise the plants and animals. Source: Neues Museum, Berlin)

 

His cult spread from India west to Germany, Spain and England, and was supported by soldiers of the Roman Empire, becoming the primary rival to the newly developing religion of Christianity. In 307, Diocletian consecrated a temple on the Danube River to Mithra, “Protector of the Empire,” as stated in britannica.com.

According to myth, Mithra was born, bearing a torch and armed with a knife, beside a sacred stream and under a sacred tree, a child of the earth itself. He soon rode, and later killed, the life-giving cosmic bull, whose blood fertilizes all vegetation. Mithra’s slaying of the bull was a popular subject of Hellenic art and became the prototype for a bull-slaying ritual of fertility in the Mithraic cult,” according to the entry written by the editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica.

Mithra, also spelled Mithras, was the god of light in ancient Indo-Iranian mythology.

The Persian version of Mithra was a benevolent solar deity bestowing wealth and health.

He was mighty, strong, unconquered and king of the gods, and was often portrayed as a sun disc in a chariot drawn by white horses.

Winter festivals, common in cultures around the world, were intended to strengthen the fire of the sun so that it would return. They were celebrated in the name of Mithras, who can be called as a god to your circle this Yule.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

Book Review – Astrology for Success: Make the Most of Your Sun Sign Potential by Cass and Janie Jackson

October, 2018

Astrology for Success: Make the Most of Your Sun Sign Potential

by Cass and Janie Jackson

Being an astrologer, I am always on the look out for books that are clear and concise in a format that is easily understandable by the lay person. Astrology for Success by Cass and Janie Jackson fills that niche quite nicely. In fact, their other books seem to also follow this premise that simple is best.

The authors have chosen to focus on the Sun Sign in a natal chart as the tool of use in understanding your innate potential. This decision aligns quite nicely for those who are accustomed to reading daily horoscopes that, most often, are Sun Sign based. I would venture to guess that most people know at least their astrological Sun Sign, if for no other reason that as a fact of trivia and identification. So, this book already speaks to a broader audience than many books on astrology would.

Each of the thirteen chapters is dedicated to a single astrological sign, in accord with their placement around the flat wheel. The thirteenth chapter is a charming teaser for anyone who wishes to explore another biggie in the natal chart- your Rising sign. This little tidbit at the end adds another layer of interest beyond the personality and traits of the Sun Sign.

Each chapter analyzes the Main Characteristics of the astrological sign, the Plan for Success based upon the innate potential of that sign’s characteristics, Health, Relationships, Career Paths and highlights of Chronological Patterns that potentially play out in the course of the individual’s lifetime. Although the chapters are short, there is enough to sink your teeth into and prompt a deeper look in self-analysis and awareness.

This is definitely a book I would recommend to my students and clients who are interested in having some usable information on hand in a simple format.

Astrology for Success: Make the Most of Your Sun Sign Potential

***

About the Author:

Robin Fennelly is a Wiccan High Priestess, teacher, poet and author.

She is the author of (click on book titles for more information):

 

The Inner Chamber Volume One

It’s Written in the Stars

Astrology

 

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Two

poetry of the Spheres (Volume 2)

Qabalah

 

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Three

Awakening the Paths

Qabalah

 

A Year With Gaia

The Eternal Cord

 

Temple of the Sun and Moon

Luminous Devotions

 

The Magickal Pen Volume One (Volume 1)

A Collection of Esoteric Writings

 

The Elemental Year

Aligning the Parts of SELF

 

The Enchanted Gate

Musings on the Magick of the Natural World

 

Sleeping with the Goddess

Nights of Devotion

 

A Weekly Reflection

Musings for the Year

 

Her books are available on Amazon or on this website and her Blogs can be found atRobin Fennelly 

 

Follow Robin on Instagram & Facebook.

Book Review – The Modern Witchcraft Book of Natural Magick: Your Guide to Crafting Charms, Rituals & Spells from the Natural World by Judy Ann Nock

September, 2018

Book Review

The Modern Witchcraft Book of Natural Magick: Your Guide to Crafting Charms, Rituals & Spells from the Natural World”

by Judy Ann Nock

Published by Adams Media, an imprint of Simon & Schuster

Copyright June 2018

Pages: 240

This book is not intended to be another Wicca 101 book; rather think of it more along the lines of Witchcraft 3.0,” Wiccan High Priestess Judy Ann Nock wrote in her introduction.

Each of Its eleven chapters delves into a realm of nature magick including seed, air, sun and fire, the moon, Gaia, time and the cosmos.

The Realm of Water covers Wells of Emotion, Rivers and Oceans. Its 15 pages offer an introduction to water, a meditation, instructions for a ritual bath, a blessing spell and a spell for prosperity, along with directions for making herbal tinctures and an aromatherapy spray. All involve water in some way.

In Magic Takes Root: The Woodland Realm, Nock writes about nature being a powerful healer and the importance of staying connected to it, saying, “A simple ritual of walking in the woods, meditating outside of a building, or taking part in the currently popular trend of ‘forest bathing’ can calm the mind and bring about a state of peace.”

She offers a centering meditation done sitting at the base of a tree, and a ritual for creating a personal tree oracle – not to tell fortunes, but as a tool to “communicate with the elements of natural magic.” The ritual, the lore and the charm all work with the sacredness of trees, with reminders of our connectedness to the seasons and rhythms of the Mother, and our responsibility to be stewards of the earth.

Readers will be inspired to draw on the powers found in nature when doing magick, thanks to the variety of meditations, rituals, spells and charms. There’s a recipe for consecrated crescent cakes to have for the ritual of calling down the moon, a solar charm for strength, and instructions for preparing a candle for magick.

Some tables are scattered throughout the book with such information as healing herbs, planetary correspondences and spirit animals.

As promised, this book can help deepen a connection to natural magick and offer inspiration beyond the basics. While it wouldn’t be in my top 10 list of favorite magic books, it would make a useful addition the collection of an intermediate practitioner.

Nock is the founder of a goddess spirituality group and the author of “A Witch’s Grimoire.” She lives in New York City.

The Modern Witchcraft Book of Natural Magick: Your Guide to Crafting Charms, Rituals, and Spells from the Natural World

 

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

For My Witches in the Wardrobe

June, 2018

 

For My Witches in the Wardrobe

Being a Witch can be difficult when you have to hide who you are. It makes it a challenge to practice your Religion or Craft.

I, myself, am “Out of the Broom Closet.” Now that is a phrase that leaves a bad taste in my mouth. The thought that a person has to hide who they are turns my stomach! No matter WHAT it is they are made to feel they need to hide about themselves! But, I understand not everyone has the freedoms I do. No, I am not talking american, I am talking the freedoms of everyday life! It could be the freedom of being an adult woman, who can stand on her own and not live in my parents household so can speak for herself. It could be the fact that my family accepts me in all my ways. Not all families are open-minded. Mine really isn’t. I’m just a loud mouth. They are used to me. 🙂

Anyway this column is to you, my Witches. My letters to you, my love letters of sorts. My thoughts, ideas, & expressions of love, faith, and devotion. Ways we can express ourselves in the corners, and cupboards, in locked rooms, or screaming out loud in code, so no one knows.

In this column I will discuss ways to bring Witchdom into your everyday lives. Ways to express your Paganness on the downlow. How to be you, but without shouting, “I am a Witch, Hear me Cast!” I will share ideas, crafts, thoughts, & experiments in hopes that we can all lead more fulfilled lives. Hopefully, I will hear back from our readers on how these ideas help, and maybe hear some of your ideas on how you bring spirituality into your everyday lives in ways that help you in hopes of helping others.

For the first installment where should we begin but with Candles!!! Yes Candles!! What is not the most Witchy item in our toolbox but The Candle?

 

(Photo by Micheile Henderson)

 

Now using candles in your daily life without anyone knowing you are a witch can be as simple as burning smelly candles in your house to soothe yourself and others or as deep as coordinating colors, scents, & inscribing sigils on them when no one is around or in the privacy of your bedroom.

 

Scented Candles & the Witch

You can burn scented candles all day long and no one will assume you are a witch. Scented candles are for everyone. Male or female, young or old!

Every grocery store, internet store, dollar store, & general store sells scented candles. Heck, most stores sell scented candles these days, even bookstores! Many will even tell you what they are for on the wrapping.

You can find nice enough lavender candles for relaxation in your near by dollar stores. Or, if you like to spend a little more on your candles, you can find some like this one that I found in Barnes and Nobles.

 

 

It cost $18.95.

Now, a quick lesson hereit says Dream on it and has a quote by Thoreau, but the scent is Bamboo & Green Tea. Bamboo is for wishes and luck. Green tea, also, is for luck and success. So that goes with realizing your hopes and dreams, rather than, having good sleeping dreams. Do not simply go by what a box says. Always look up correspondences for ingredients yourself! That is very important.

 

Color Coordinating your Candles

Something else to consider with candles for Magickal Purpose is Color. Here is a quick reference guide to Color Magick with candles to help you when choosing the hue of your candles to coincide with what you are preparing:

White – Divining, Purity, Healing, Exorcism

Pink – Love, Friendship, Emotions

Purple – Power, Spirit, Wisdom

Red – Strength, Lust, Courage

Green – Luck, Wealth, Fertility, Ambition

Blue – Tranquility, Health, Patience

Yellow – Learning, Comfort, Confidence, Joy

Black – Banish Negativity, Retribution

Now, these are just a few choice correspondence words to go along with each color. I think from these jump off points, though, you can pick which colors to work with for different goals.

 

Inscribing Candles for your Purpose

What type of candles do you prefer to use for Magick? I, personally, use Chime Candles for magick.

 

 

I like to have my candles burn through for my spells completely, I do not like to put them out. I find that votive, 3-day, or 7-day candles try my patience. Chime Candles burn for approximately 2.5 hours. They are 4.5 inches tall. On the proper day, moon, time, what have you, when I need my magick done, I want it done.

But, me, I like to enhance my Candle Magick by inscribing words or symbols on my Chime Candles for my exact purpose. I feel this carving into them is concentrating energy, focus, and my pure intent of my goal. A meditative moment of sorts.

I do not carve deeply as the candles are not thick. I have used a pin or sewing needle to do the job. I have used my feather quill from my Altar.

What I do, for example, is if a friend is feeling ill, I may take a blue Chime Candle and carve with pin or quill his or her name on one side and the word health on the other with a heart for my love for them and a pentacle to seal the deal. It does not have to be the neatest of carvings as the candles are not the easiest to carve into.

Before lighting my candle I will hold it between my hands and imagine what I want it to manifest. Sometimes a whole story will come to mind. I will let that story play through in my head. I will hold it and dream it for as long as I feel I need to before lighting it. Sometimes a few seconds, sometimes minutes, sometimes longer.

This can all be done in the privacy of your own home, in your private quarters, in a meadow, or a corner of a park. No one need know what you are doing. You can go about your business of doing what you need to do while the candle burns in the room you are in, while you babysit it for the 2.5 hours it takes. Never leave a candle unattended. If need be, you may put it out and relight it later.

I have carved my intentions around the tip in a hurry for privacy. Around the tips of candles and let it burn down passed a certain line to cast the spell, so then you need not wait for an entire candle to burn out. Write your friends name around the tip of candle instead of up and down and let the candle burn down 10 minutes.

 

Reuse the Old

What to do with all those old candles you may have lying around that you can no longer get to light. You know the ones I mean, with the too short wicks where you can no longer get your hands safely in the jars, or where the wicks have somehow just disappeared for some reason! Here’s an idea!!! You can always make new candles from them. These candles you get to infuse with spells or intentions of your own.

There are many ways to DIY candle leftovers. Here are a few sites I found with great ways to do it:

Live the Fancy Life

Sandpaper & Glue

Happy Go Lucky

 

The Summer Sun Candle DIY Way

 

 

Another good way to melt the old wax out of candles to make new candles from them is to use the Summer sun! Take your old candles and bring them outside during the heat and leave them out there for some time to melt. Keep covers on them and let nature do it’s job. When they are melted remove the old wicks. Place a new wick you have purchased, from either your local craft shop or online, into the new jar or whatever you will be using as your candle holder. Be sure it is safe to use!! Pour the wax into the new holder with the wick. You can use anything you feel fit to hold the new wick in place like a pencil or skewer. Whatever works for you. Then leave it to set. You may need to fill the new candle holder more than once. You can mix scents & colors. Play around. Make your own Witchy Creations! You can even play around with your holders when you learn what is safe to use. Like using sea shells and bottle caps as new candle candle holders for instance!

 

 

 

 

Until Next Time…

It has been a lot of fun and I look forward to next month’s column.

Stay Witchie, even if it’s just between you and me -xoxo

 

***

About the Author:

Jennifer Sacasa-Wright is simply a Witch. She runs PaganPagesOrg eMag.  She loves hearing your opinions & thoughts on the eMagazine and welcomes comments. You can email her at jenniferwright at paganpages dot org.  When she is not working on PaganPagesOrg she is creating in some other way & trying to make the world a better place with her family.

 

 

WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

July, 2017

Sun Philter

 

 

Merry meet.

In reading “The herbal Alchemist’s Handbook” by Karen Harrison (that is reviewed in this issue), I came across directions for a philter – an infusion of herbs that is charged with intentions and the energies of the moon or the sun. With the Summer Solstice approaching, I chose to create one with the energy of the sun.

 

 

In her book, she says to gather calendula, Saint John’s Wort, chamomile and juniper berries, and at sunrise, put a teaspoon of each in a chalice, cauldron or bowl that can hold 16 ounces. As they are added, she directs you to focus on the healing properties they offer, such as chamomile for serenity and Saint John’s wort for confidence. A sun gemstone – sunstone, diamond or gold topaz – could also be added.

The directions continued, having you meditate on health, energy and vitality as you direct your breath over the mixture, then pour in 12 ounces of spring or distilled water, stirring deosil while charging it with intention. Place the container in the sun and the next morning, strain it and pour into a sterilized container; store in the refrigerator. To use, she tells you to add a tablespoon to a cup of herbal tea when you think you are getting sick or if you are feeling fatigued. It can also be used as a wash to hasten the healing of burns, cuts, bites or sprains.

Using Harrison’s directions as a guide, I did some research and came up with a longer list of botanicals that are said to contain sun energy. Some of them, in addition to hers, are ash, birch, buttercup bush, cinnamon, hibiscus, hops, marigold, rue, peony, saffron, sunflower and walnuts.

On Midsummer’s Eve, I gathered up as many as I had on hand – in varying quantities – and put them in a glass mason jar. I then put 12 ounces of filtered water in a larger mason jar. Just as the sun rose, I held them up to the first rays, poured the herbs into the water and swirled them around deosil while infusing them with healing intentions. The jar sat on my windowsill until mid-day when I took it out to my garden with me. While I planted and weeded and harvested herbs for the protection bundle I make every Summer Solstice to hang above my door, the jar sat in the sun, absorbing warmth as well as light. It then went back on my south-facing windowsill until sunset, when I went to a spot not far from home and held it up to catch the last rays of the longest day before the sun dipped behind the hills and trees.

 

 

It was after midnight when I was moved to strain the contents into a quart mason jar. There were approximately 10 ounces of liquid. I felt guided to fill the jar, adding approximately another 10 ounces of filtered water and 10 ounces of vodka to stabilize it, making something similar to the flower essences I’ve made before. While my intent was to keep the jar on the counter, it ended up in the refrigerator.

I added a tablespoon to an oversized mug of herbal tea and could sense the warmth, strength and power of the sun.

There’s still plenty of summer sun left should you decide to brew a batch for yourself.

 

 

Merry part. And merry meet again.

 

WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

June, 2015

Save the Sun

Merry Meet.

June brings Litha, the summer solstice the day with the most sunlight. This craft will allow you to keep some of it for other times.

crafts

Gather together glitter, confetti and any similar material perhaps crushed yellow gemstones and put it all in a clear jar or in a bowl. Hold it up to the first rays of the morning sun. Keep it in the sunlight for as long as you feel is necessary to absorb its essence, power, life force, joy and warmth. Perhaps even put it out again at noon and sunset.

Then, divide your material into tiny bottle or jars and label them Sun Dustwith directions to sprinkle as needed for light or warmth.

You can decorate the bottles by inserting a tiny screw eye hook into the top of the cork and attaching beads, charms and other trinkets or hang it from a cord, ribbon or chain.

If weather will prevent you from catching the rays on June 21, try for the 20th or the 22nd. If you look at the sunrise and sunset times of each day, youll notice that there is less than a minutes difference in the length of each day.

Merry part. And merry meet again…

Witchcrafting: Crafts for witches

June, 2014

“Here Comes the Sun”
Sun
Merry Meet.
June brings us in the Northern Hemisphere the summer solstice, also known as Litha and midsummer. It’s one of the four solar festivals. It’s the day with the most time between sunrise and sunset – even if it is just seconds different from the day or two before and after. For thousands of years, this is the time people have honored the Sun God with bonfires, feasts, torchlight parades, games and other celebrations. 
One tradition to rise early and greet the sunrise. Another common tradition is to light a candle and keep it going the entire day, especially if it’s cloudy or raining.
While it is a time to celebrate life, power and fertility, witches know that the wheel is ever turning, and that the solstice signals a shift as the sun begins to wane.  
One way I have celebrated the solstice is to make a sun. You can make a spell out of it if you wish, weaving in a spell or an intention. 
Noon is a good time for this project – with the sun is at its strongest.
In preparation, collect four sticks of roughly equal length (three to four feet is good). Lay them in a star shape. You can bind them together with twine, or not, as you choose (it just makes the first several passes around a bit easier). 
Cut strips from a variety of  yellow material about two to three inches wide. I used everything from old T-shirts to quilt scraps, some solid, some not. Attach the strips end to end. This can be done using hand stitching, a machine or even fabric glue that is allowed to dry thoroughly. There’s probably no reason staples wouldn’t also work. Rather than making only one very long piece, it’s easier to make a few long strips, attaching a new one as the previous one nears its end. 
Taking a strip of cloth pieces, tie one end to the a branch very close to the center, and then begin to weave around the circle clockwise, over and under, over and under, until the branches are held in place and there is enough space to work with each branch individually. Figure at least two to four times around. This will hold the center relatively stable, even without twine.
Then, as you approach each branch, bring the fabric over the top, wrap it around the branch and go under it, pulling the fabric tight before moving to the next branch, going over the top of it, under and around it, and on to the next, etc. Keep the fabric from getting loose as you go. If you lose the rhythm and go under, around and over a branch or two, it will be fine, just revert back to over, around and under when you notice.
If you choose, you can weave with intention, making each wrap around a stick something for which you’re grateful or a blessing, perhaps channel the sun’s energy into the piece.
Continue until you decide it’s done. Tie off the fabric and tuck in the  end. Hang or “plant” it as you choose.
With assistance, this craft is appropriate for all ages and abilities. It can be a solo or group project. It can also be modified so that everyone in a group make smaller, individual suns weaving thinner strips of fabric or yarn around smaller twigs, Popsicle sticks or chop sticks.
In addition to the summer solstice, Yule would be another appropriate time to make this craft, celebrating the return of the sun.
Merry part.
And merry meet again.