turkey

WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

August, 2018

Claws with Crystals


Merry meet.

Bones are a type of fetish,” Sarah Anne Lawless posted on her website. “A fetish is ‘an object regarded with awe as being the embodiment or habitation of a potent spirit or as having magical potency (source).’ The word fetish originates from the French fétiche which stems from the Portuguese word feitiço meaning ‘charm’ or ‘sorcery.’ Feathers, bones, crystals, and stones are all types of fetishes. Skulls and bones have an appeal to witches who perform spirit work and are a necessary and simple way to connect with spirits of the dead and of animals.

Working with bones is not just for necromancers and black magicians. Practitioners who work with bones are a wide range of healers, diviners, shapeshifters, rootworkers, witches, shamans, druids, and pagans.”

When a hunter I respected offered me wings and claws from turkey he had killed, I accepted. I covered the severed ends all with salt, rubbing in, placing them in a box and adding more salt. When more were gifted to me, I placed the fleshy ends in borax. Both were left to dry for several months. (An explanation of a process can be found on many sites.)


When I received them they were already a couple of days old, but the claws were pliable. I was drawn to having them hold crystals. The shape of some of the polished stones I chose made them unworkable. Thankfully, the pagan store I frequent did not mind me bringing in the legs and holding up crystals to determine what would be a good fit. Certain stones seemed to want certain claws, so I went with it.


There is a lot to be said for a more intentional approach, but as I sensed only one was for me, I did not consider uses and intentions that you would if you were making one for yourself.


I positioned each toe and talon to curl around the stone and then began wrapping it all in string to secure it while it dried. In one instance I used tape and while it worked, I think the string was easier to use and adjust.


After a few months had gone by I unwrapped them and found each was stone securely held.

It would be natural to use them as a wand – as is, embellished or attached to another wand – to direct power. A woman who bought one planned to tie it with a cord that went around her neck so it hung almost to her waist.


Bones carry the animal’s magical attributes which is one of the reasons I have worked with bear claws, a turtle shell and a coyote’s jawbone. Smaller bones have fit in mojo bags created to address various needs.

Turkey is considered a good omen, signaling that gifts are imminent. It’s also “a symbol of sacrifice for renewal and that generosity will open the doors to growth and rebirth,” according to a few websites posting the same information.


Turkey as a totem animal means you are “the abundance generator” for your community.

You have a gift for attracting all the bounty of the universe available to you and you are willing to share. You will often meet the needs of others in a giveaway self-sacrifice form simply because all life is sacred to you. You easily translate your life experience into growth and understanding. You recognize that what you do for others you also do for yourself,” according to spirit-animals.com and other sites.

Awareness, creation, generosity, harvest, pride, purpose, sacrifice, understanding and virility are also associated with turkey.

Knowing this, if you would like to make something similar, ask the Source and then be ready to receive what the universe brings it to you.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self-taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

Sacred Place, Sacred Space

June, 2018

Catal Huyuk

(Photo Credit: factsanddetails.com)

For those who love archaeology and the discovery of ancient places, Catal Huyuk holds a special place.

Widely accepted as the largest, oldest Neolithic village or town ever found, it was home to 3,000 – 8,000 people.

Located in southern Anatolia, in Turkey, it was first discovered in 1958. It was not until the archaeologist, James Mellaart, began excavating in 1961, and continuing at least until 1965, that the world began to take notice.

Catal Huyuk was lived in 9,400 to 7,700 years ago and only about 5% has been excavated at this time.

Restoration of a room (Photo Credit: facts and details.com)

The houses were built very close together, in clusters, and normally had 3 rooms. The point of access was through the ceiling, which was also the source of both light and ventilation. Subsequent homes were just built over older ones, making it an archaeological wonder.

There are several larger buildings that could have been used for public events or worship. Colorful murals and figurines suggest that much symbolism was used in their spirituality. These murals are the oldest found on structures built by human hands.

(Photo Credit: michelleheaton.info)

Their dead have been found buried within the village, and found beneath the homes and hearths.

Many tools, i.e., axes and mace heads, etc have been found, as well as grinding tools, and jewelry.

It would appear that the people of Catal Huyuk lived simple lives and there seems to be no indication of gender or caste classifications. Findings also indicate a vegetarian diet consisting of grains and legumes, a diet which many are following again today.

There has been an abundance of female figures found in Catal Huyuk, which James Mellart indicates a female deity, and the worship of a Mother Goddess. While many animal figurines were found and a small number of male figurines, the female far outweigh these. Some of these figurines showed the Goddess flanked by two feline figures, which represent as guardian to powerful places. Similar figurines have been found at different sites around the world, including Malta. There are many archaeologists that deny that these figurines indicate a Goddess worship, or a peaceful civilization; the bulk of these archaeologists are male, but there are also females who refute Mellart’s assertion.

The renowned archaeologist, Marija Gimbutas, advocated for this peaceful civilization and Mother Goddess who has been worshiped from Paleolithic times until the present day. I highly recommend any of Ms. Gimbutas’ books; they are well worth the read.

(Photo Credit: newworldencyclopedia.org)

Recently, in 2016, an 8,000 year old female figurine was discovered in Catal Huyuk, found with a valuable piece of obsidian, which would indicate an honor and a reverence.

(Photo Credit: arestechnica.com)

(Photo Credit: ancient-wisdom.com)

While there will always be those who will deny the existence of these peaceful civilizations, as well as the existence of the Goddess, in the past and in current times, there are enough of those who believe differently and who know that some day, the Goddess will once more make Herself known to all and peace will once more be the way of the world. May this be soon.

(Photo Credit: Pinterest.com)

(Photo Credit: Pinterest.com)

Blessings!

***

About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is MysticalShores@gmail.com

My Name is Isis: The Egyptian Goddess

Aramid’s Cauldron

February, 2012

While everyone is busy working to use more holistic recipes into their family’s diets, a lot of times we forget about our four legged friends. Here is just one of the recipes I personally feed my dogs, and their vet says it has really done wonders for them.

Turkey Special Recipe

Ingredients

•1 lb. ground turkey

> •6 c. water
>
>  •2 c. brown rice
>
>  •1/2 c. of frozen broccoli, carrots and cauliflowers.

•1 t. dried rosemary

Place the water, ground turkey, rice, and rosemary into a large saucepan. Stir until the turkey is broken up and evenly distributed throughout the mixture. Bring to a boil over high heat, and then reduce heat to low. Let the mixture simmer for 20 minutes, before adding the frozen vegetables and cooking for an additional 5 minutes.

Aramid’s Cauldron

May, 2011

While everyone is busy working to use more holistic recipes into their family’s diets, a lot of times we forget about our four legged friends. Here is just one of the recipes I personally feed my dogs, and their vet says it has really done wonders for them.

Turkey Special Recipe

Ingredients

•1 lb. ground turkey

•6 c. water

•2 c. brown rice

•1/2 c. of frozen broccoli, carrots and cauliflowers.

•1 t. dried rosemary

Place the water, ground turkey, rice, and rosemary into a large saucepan. Stir until the turkey is broken up and evenly distributed throughout the mixture. Bring to a boil over high heat, and then reduce heat to low. Let the mixture simmer for 20 minutes, before adding the frozen vegetables and cooking for an additional 5 minutes.