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8 Effective Natural Remedies to Prevent a Cold

December 1st, 2016

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

Hot Colds and Cold Colds – Winter Health

Winter is coming. So are colds and the flu. Here are some tips for preventing these viral illnesses. And for getting well fast if you do get sick.

Preventing colds and the flu can be summed up in three words: Wash your hands. The viruses that cause colds and the flu most readily enter our bodies by means of our hands. Wash your hands after shopping. Remind your children to wash their hands as soon as they come home from school. A little “hysterical hygiene” goes a long way to keeping colds at bay.

Of course, there are herbs that can be used to help thwart colds and the flu. Yarrow is a clear favorite, especially as a tincture. Teachers, moms, and wise children find a dose of 5-25 drops of yarrow tincture in the morning in some liquid reduces the likelihood of getting sick by more than half.

Astragalus is gaining fame for its ability to support strong immune system functioning. I throw a few tongue-depressor-like pieces in my soups, where they infuse their goodness without imparting much flavor. Powdered astragalus can be added to almost anything, from oatmeal to pancakes, soups to gravies. And there is always the tincture, which works well in doses of 1-3 dropperfuls a day. (If at all possible, use domestic astragalus, rather than that from China.)

Eleuthero, which used to be called Siberian ginseng, is another immune system nourisher, used in the same ways as astragalus: cooked into food or taken as a tincture.

And don’t forget honey. A spoonful at the first sign of a sore throat or runny nose can kill the bacteria responsible and help you get better fast. (Note: Do not give honey to babies under 12 months old.)

And if you do get sick, here’s my favorite way to get well fast.

* Treat a cold cold with heat.
* Treat a hot cold with cold.

This may sound too easy, but it is actually one of the most effective ways I know of to minimize the severity and duration of a cold (or the flu). I first learned about cold colds and hot colds when I was studying Five Element Theory with a sweetheart who was attending acupuncture school.

It is important to remember that “cold” and “hot” don’t refer to temperature; they refer to what we might call metabolism. Thus, the person with a cold cold could very well have a raging fever and the person with a hot cold may have no fever at all. Similarly, hot foods and herbs are not necessarily cooked, and cold foods and herbs need not be refrigerated.

So how can we tell the difference between a cold cold and a hot cold? And what are cold herbs and hot herbs, cold foods and hot foods?

The person with a cold cold (or a cold flu) is pale. Their bodily fluids are copious and without color: The nose runs with clear or white mucus; the bowels are loose and the feces are light in color; urination is profuse and colorless. The tongue may be coated with a white moss. If there is fever, it is accompanied by chills. The person with a cold cold seeks heat and hot foods.

The person with a hot cold (or a hot flu) is ruddy; the face, or at least the cheeks, are very red. The eyes may feel dry and irritated. Their bodily fluids are scant and dark: nasal mucus is dry, yellowish, or “stopped up;” the bowels slow and feces are hard; urination is infrequent and highly colored. The tongue may be red or coated with a yellow moss. If there is a fever, it is “raging.” The person with a hot cold seeks coolness and has little appetite.

When you have a cold cold, indulge your desire for heating foods and herbs: Drink lots of hot spicy herbal teas with honey*, such as ginger tea, cinnamon tea, or any of the spicy “Yogi Tea” type blends. Nourish yourself with chicken soup, beef broth, miso soup. Enjoy baked winter squash, baked potatoes, baked yams, baked garlic. Eat lots of olive oil, ghee, butter, olives, and avocados. Eat beans and eat the warming grains: kasha, rye, oats. Stay warm; take a hot bath or a hot shower and wrap up snugly before going to sleep.

When you have a hot cold, indulge your desire for frozen fruit smoothies. Drink lemon and honey* water, iced nettle infusion, hibiscus and mint teas. Nourish yourself with seaweed salads, cucumber sandwiches, and fresh tomatoes with basil. Enjoy berries and melons, green salads, and roasted fowl. Eat the cooling grains: corn, millet, spelt. Eat a little something even if your appetite is small. Stay cool; take off your shoes and socks and put your bare feet on the ground. But keep covers handy when you go to sleep.

You see, cold colds turn into hot colds and vice versa. They don’t stay the same the whole time you are sick. So be prepared to pull the covers up to your chattering teeth and flowing nose even if you went to bed stuffed up and sweltering. Or to throw off the pile of covers you clutched hours earlier. The real beauty of this idea of hot colds and cold colds is the premise that everything, even a cold, will change and so the cure comes not from knowing the right answer, but in following the flow of the sickness and offering appropriate treatments. I imagine a balance scale, swinging back and forth between hot and cold, with me gently damping the swings, making each one a little less severe, until single-pointed stillness – health – is regained.

Whether dealing with a hot cold or a cold cold, you can eat as much of the neutral nourishing foods – rice, wheat, fish, honey*, and yogurt – as you wish. But, beware of taking vitamin C while harboring a cold or the flu; it is extremely cooling.

I hope these tips for preventing and dealing with colds and the flu help you, and those you love, stay in glowing good health all winter long.

Green Blessings.

(*Note: Do not give honey to babies under 12 months old.)

Wise Woman Ways to Boost Your Energy

 

Almost every woman has, at one time or another, felt so fatigued she wanted to cry. But for some women, and for a variety of reasons — including menopause, caring for a new-born, working odd hours, chronic anxiety, and poverty, to name only a few — fatigue is a constant, not an occasional, problem.

Stimulants don’t really give us more energy, though they are what many women turn to when they feel too tired. Stimulants create false energy, leaving us more exhausted at deeper levels. One more cup of coffee, one more soft drink, one more jolt of fear increases energy, to be sure. But these choices also deplete our bones of their minerals, weaken our core energy, and prevent truly restful, restorative sleep. Even herbal stimulants, like cayenne and guarana, are, well, stimulants. They push us too hard and erode our long-term health.

Are there ways to boost energy that are effective and healthy? My guide, Grandmother Growth, gave me some ideas of how to help myself when I feel bone-tired. And I gathered together the best remedies I know, plus the wisdom of my Wise Woman friends, so you can help yourself, too, when you are too weary for words.

“Fall into my arms and sleep,” offers Grandmother Growth. “You don’t have to make things happen; they will happen on their own. Let me hold you. Let go. Don’t resist. Rest. You are working hard. You are delving deep and changing yourself. Of course you are tired. Change is hard work. Rest in my strong arms. Let go. Give your weariness to me. Let go of all that worries you. Surrender yourself into my strength. Take courage from me. Let me support you. Let me ease you. Let go.”

Extreme fatigue indicates a profound need to do nothing. Ask family and friends to give you a day totally off . . . and take it! Barricade yourself in your room if need be (or, like the cartoon character Sylvia, in the bathroom).

Be gentle with yourself. The internal processes that occur during puberty, motherhood, menopause or any other profound change in your life require tremendous amounts of energy. Even if you provide yourself with very high quality nutrients and use your energy wisely, you may still feel unreasonably tired. Many cultures offer newborns and moms a quiet, alone month or more, allow menopausal women to retire for a year or more while they Change, and give grieving parents/partners/children/friends time off from responsibility. If yours doesn’t, if you can’t, at least be gentle with yourself.

 

Give yourself a break: Every hour, take a 60-second break. Breathe deeply; stand up and stretch; drink a glass of water or some herbal infusion. Schedule a regular time to meditate or take a nap every day. Small frequent rests help more than an extra hour of sleep; but do both if you can.

Set aside an hour a week to do something indulgent for yourself: a long soak in a hot bath, a manicure, a walk alone in a beautiful place. Nourish yourself and you will have more energy to give to others.

Treat yourself to a massage once a month. (It need not break your budget; find someone willing to barter for a skill or product you have.) A skillful massage releases tension, helping you get more benefit from your sleep and downtime, thus liberating more energy and helping you begin the upward spiral into increased vitality.

“Lower your standards.” This advice, though difficult to hear, has been one of the most important guidelines for me in choosing a life that delights and energizes me. It helped me choose to let the floor go upswept, the dishes unwashed, the bed unmade, while I gardened, or studied, or even just went for a walk in the woods. When I do the things I want to do I have LOTS more energy. What are you doing that saps your strength and erodes your delight in life? Find a way to quit, or at least cut down on the time you devote to it.

List ten good things about fatigue, laziness, lethargy, and procrastination. I’ve found laziness to be my best guide to efficiency; lethargy has stopped me from taking foolish risks; and procrastination helps me find more efficient ways to proceed. Love and honor your fatigue for helping you conserve energy and giving you the time to find creative new ways to do the same old things.

Seaweeds of all kinds help restore energy by nourishing nervous, immune, and hormonal systems. Make it a habit to eat seaweed as a green vegetable at least once a week. Try kelp in your oatmeal, wakame in your beans, kombu in your soups, hijiki salads, toasted dulse, sea palm fronds, and deep-fried nori!

Counter that tired-every-day feeling: Get down and get grounded energy from roots. Try a tincture of ginseng, siberian ginseng, yellow dock, or dandelion roots. A dose is 10-20 drops of any one root, taken with meals.

Tired blood? You may need more iron: eat a spoonful of molasses or try a dropperful of yellow dock tincture several times a day.

Stir it up! Don’t just sit there! Energy is attracted to energy. Get moving this way: Stand up, feet shoulder-width, knees relaxed. Swing your arms toward one side, then the other. Let the shoulders and hips move as you twist your upper body. Let your arms move freely. Continue for a minute or two. Then, start rocking your tail bone, your whole pelvis, forward and back, forward and back, again for at least a minute. Alright!

Green is the color of plant energy. The plants with the deepest green give you the most energy. A daily cup of nettle infusion increases energy without wiring your nerves. Nettle strengthens the adrenals, allowing you to tolerate more stress with less harm. And it nourishes your immune system, too. To make it: Put one ounce of dried nettle leaf in a quart jar. Fill to the top with boiling water. Cap tightly and steep at least four hours (overnight is fine). Strain and drink. Refrigerate the remainder and consume within 36 hours. (Leftovers may be used as a hair rinse or fertilizer for your house plants.) I drink several quarts of nettle infusion every week. It helps me have the energy to teach all day and write for hours each evening.

Oatstraw infusion builds deep energy for the next day, especially when you have been riding an emotional roller coaster. Oatstraw nourishes the nerves, easing anxiety and improving our ability to live with uncertainty. Make it like the nettle infusion, using a full ounce of oatstraw to a quart of boiling water. Ok to drink it hot or cold, with honey or miso, or any other addition (juice, coffee, whiskey) you desire. Remember to refrigerate the infusion after it has brewed 4-8 hours, even if you don’t get a chance to strain the plant material out.

Eat more. When you’re too tired to eat, you get more tired. (If this sounds like an old wive’s tale, remember that old wives were the wise women. But, actually, it’s the latest scientific thinking.) In addition to at least one really good meal a day, eat high quality snacks hourly.

Though it seems contrary, St. Joan’s wort (Hypericum) tincture relaxes the nerves yet increases energy. A dose is 25-30 drops several times a day, including before bed. You’ll sleep better, ache less, and wake up with more energy and a brighter outlook on life.

Warming herbs such as ginger and cinnamon increase energy (but may increase hot flashes, too). Make a tea with 1 cup/250 ml boiling water and 1/2-1 teaspoon (1-2 grams) of the powder of any one of these.

Very tired women need more fuel, that is, more fat, in their diets, and best if the fats are also natural sources of vitamin E: avocados, peanut butter, sunflower seeds, tahini, and olive oil are good food sources. Herbs rich in vitamin E include nettle, seaweeds, dandelion, and watercress.

B vitamins build energy. Find them in whole grains, organ meats, sweet potatoes, avocados, egg yolks, fish, and whey. Both oatstraw and nettle infusions are good sources of B vitamins, as are red clover blossom infusion, peppermint leaves, and fenugreek seeds.

Low levels of potassium, iron, and iodine contribute to fatigue. Celery, cabbage, seaweeds, nettle infusion, and red clover infusion are excellent sources of potassium. Molasses, chocolate, seaweeds, nettle infusion, and dandelion leaves are all superb sources of iron. For iodine, seaweed shines, but sea salt, mushrooms, and greens grown in gardens fertilized with seaweed also supply significant amounts.

 

Avoid

Some women report greater fatigue on days when they’ve eaten frozen or raw food. Traditional Chinese Medicine says eating raw or chilled foods, especially cold drinks and raw juices, contributes to fatigue because you have to use your internal energy to warm up the food before you can digest it. The more tired you are, the greater your need for well-cooked foods, like nourishing herbal infusions and healing soups.

I avoid wheat grass juice, green barley powder, spirulina, and all blue green algae. None are as nourishing as nettle infusion, and all are considerably more expensive, more difficult to make yourself at home, and more likely to be sold through multi-level marketing.

“Energy-producing” foods/drugs/herbal supplements such as coffee, guarana, caffeinated drinks, and excessive amounts of black tea or chocolate will create greater fatigue in the future.

“Rest your head down on me,” crones Grandmother Growth. “For this moment, rest in me. Let the energy of the earth infuse you. Let my energy carry you. Let yourself be enough. Let go.”

 

 

 

This article is based on material found in New Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way, Alternative Approaches for Women 30-90.

 

Wise Woman books are available at www.wisewomanbookshop.com

No great thing is created suddenly, any more than a bunch of grapes or a fig.  If you tell me that you desire a fig, I answer that there must be time.  Let it first blossom, then bear fruit, then ripen. ~Epictetus (c. 50 – 120)

Every now and again I get glimpses of my Granny’s kitchen window.  Her kitchen was red and white – red cherries on the curtains – I think.  It was a small kitchen but always full of warmth and light, maybe because so much love came out of that tiny little room.

If you looked out of her window you were privy to an enchanted world, where dragonflies and fairies played among the leaves of an enormous fig tree.  She was such a captivating woman that as children – her word was above any god.  And she said that figs were fairy candy.  So be it.  We ate more figs than our stomach could handle.  Those were the sweetest fruit!

Now I have a fig tree in my side yard….and ya’ know the dragonflies and fairies really do dance on the leaves…..and the birds chirp merrily as they nourish themselves on the freshly fallen figs, which makes the cats tail swish vehemently to and fro, which attracts the dogs…which inevitably causes havoc.

Figs are one of the oldest fruits recognized by man. It’s no wonder the fig has been enjoyed for centuries. Its sweet, delicious flesh, long used as a sweetener before the advent of refined sugars, enhances both savory dishes and desserts.  High in potassium, iron, fiber and plant calcium, figs are also used for medicinal purposes as a diuretic and laxative.

Figs have been cultivated in the Eastern Mediterranean area for thousands of years. Archaeologists think it was one of the first fruits domesticated–as early as 4000 BC! Sumerian scribes writing on clay tablets around 2500 BC in the reign of King Drukagina mention figs, as do the earliest books in the Bible. Some scholars believe the forbidden fruit picked by Eve was a fig rather than an apple.

The fig tree figures in the founding of great cultures and religions. Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were suckled by a she-wolf under a fig tree, which later, in the time of Pliny, was revered as a sacred tree. While sitting under a fig tree, Siddhartha Gautama had the revelation that formed the foundations of Buddhism. Figs have been prized for both medicinal and dietary value. Mithridates, the Greek king of Pontus, heralded figs as an antidote for all ailments and instructed his physicians to consider its uses as a medicine. The early Greeks so highly prized figs that it was considered an honor to bestow the foliage and fruit. In the original Olympic games, winning athletes were crowned with fig wreaths and given figs to eat. Pliny of Rome said:

“Figs are restorative. The best food that can be eaten by those who are brought low by long sickness and are on the way to recovery. They increase the strength of young people, preserve the elderly in better health and make them look younger with fewer wrinkles”.

The fig tree can live as long as 100 years and grow to 100 feet tall ….. Aha! No wonder the fairies love that tree.

Blessings Be!
Magikal Martha

Magikal Fare

Stuffed Fresh Figs

Fill stemmed fresh figs with:
Cultured sour cream and grated orange peel

Figgie Pudding

½ c. butter
2 eggs
1 c. molasses
2 c. dried figs
½ tsp grated lemon
1 c. buttermilk
½ c. chopped walnuts
2 ½ c. flour
½ tsp baking soda
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cinnamon (ginger may be a substitute)
½ tsp nutmeg

Preheat oven to 325. Beat butter until soft. Add and beat eggs until fluffy, and molasses. Add finely chopped dried figs, grated lemon rind, and buttermilk and black walnuts. Sift all-purpose flour. Resift with baking soda.  Add baking powder; salt, cinnamon (or ginger) and nutmeg. Stir the sifted ingredients into the pudding mixture. Bake in a greased 9-inch tube pan about one hour.

Fig Preserves
This recipe comes from my great-great grandmother.  It is at least 100 years old.

5 lbs peeled figs
5 lbs sugar
1 lemon sliced

Peel and quarter figs, add sugar and sliced lemon. Let stand two or three hours to draw juice, stir occasionally.

When sugar has softened, begin cooking. Bring to a rolling boil. Boil 25-30 minutes, stirring constantly so liquid doesn’t stick to bottom of pot.

After foam disappears and juice has thickened, ladle into hot jars and seal.

Magikal Abilities

Ruler: Jupiter

Type: Tree

Element: Fire

Magikal Form: The Fig tree is androgynous.  The fruit represents the feminine and the triple lobed leaves the masculine.  Use for balance.  Fig adds enlightenment, fecundity, love, power, and wisdom to beverages.

Deities: Isis and Ra

To cause a man to view his future bride
Mix together magnate dust; powdered coral with the blood of a white pigeon to form a dough. Enclose it in a large fig, wrap it in a piece of blue cloth, and then wear it around your neck when you go to sleep.

Fairy Magic

The Apsaras, also called Sky Dancers, are fig tree fairies – actually they are Devas, who come from Hindu mythology.

They bless humans at important stages of in their lives. They have been known to seduce scholars and scientists, and sexually exhaust them so that they will not discover things which are better left alone.

Evoke the Apsaras for blessings, sex magic, good luck and protection for gamblers.


And A Little Bit of Gypsy Magick

Write a question on a fig leaf.  If the leaf dries slowly, the answer is yes, or it is a good omen.  If it dries quickly, the meaning is no or a bad omen.

To charm the pants off of someone, give them a fig.  As long as they keep the fig they will be spellbound by your presence.

Ten “Stress Stones”

Amethyst

amethyst
Having a cluster of Amethyst at hand is good for keeping negative energy away. Amethyst helps you think and act at your clearest. Wear an Amethyst pendant continuously for migraine prevention, tension headaches, and alleviating arthritic pain.
Citrine

citrine2
Also known as the “Success Stone”. Citrine encourages a bright outlook and promotes happiness. It attracts wealth and joy. It can help stabilize emotions and soothe family problems. Citrine is also good for improving stress-related digestive problems.
Clear Quartz

clearquartz
Quartz is an excellent general physical system fortifier and protector. It increases mental clarity. Hold a clear crystal at your solar plexus and breath evenly for several minutes to calm your emotions, to relax the body, to clear the mind, and to refresh your energy. Stare into the crystal to clear writer’s block and to increase creativity.
Fluorite

fluorite
Fluorite is a stone to unblock stuck energies. For digestive systems problems use the yellow/green color combination. For pains in the skeletal and muscular system, use the blue/white color combination. For head area complaints, use the purple/clear combination. For asthma, wear the green colored Fluorite. To help congested mental thoughts, use a purple cluster in your work area, or position a cluster at your crown chakra while sleeping.
Garnet

garnet
Garnet is an energy revitalizer. Excellent for strengthening the base chakra. It promotes sexual energy (for your self and partner). It helps increase circulation to the legs and pelvic area. It reduces menstrual pain when held or taped over the ovaries and uterus. Garnet can increase sexual stimulation and fertility, too.

Hematite

hematite
Dubbed, “The Anti-Stress Stone”. Hematite reflects back negative energies to the sender (so you don’t end up taking them on yourself). Hematite dissolves the issues when one meets with confrontation. Tape a small piece over the leg and back areas to reduce pain and to increase electromagnetic circulation. Hematite helps balance the meridians.
Malachite

malachite2
Malachite is excellent for Type A personalities and for those prone to heart disease and stresses to internal organs. It helps to detoxify the liver and to increase blood circulation. Malachite is excellent for breaking up old energy patterns. Use it with Rose Quartz to soften the effects of a broken heart! Due to the possibly toxic copper content of this stone, keep Malachite away from pets and children, and do not wear it against the skin for long periods of time. This stone is for external use only.
Rose Quartz

rosequartz
“The Love Stone” – Rose Quartz is very protective and soothing for many issues. Place a large chunk of the stone at your Heart Center for 15 minutes to relax after a stressful day. Rose Quartz helps to unblock anxiety and to promote healing of private emotional issues. It allows one to become more receptive and open to challenges.
Smokey Quartz

Smoky_quartz_01
Smokey Quartz is an excellent stabilizer for mood swings. It helps ground feelings of depression, and both absorbs and transmutes negativity. This stone is best worn at the solar plexus, the seat of the emotions. Smokey Quartz is excellent for PMS and cranky persons; and good for persons imbalanced due to extreme stress and burn-out. It provides a protective field for recovery.
Turquoise

turquoise2
“A Stone of Protection” – Turquoise is an excellent toner for all systems of the body. It helps prevent organs from absorbing toxins and breaking down. Wear this stone at the throat to strengthen your will and to communicate effectively. It helps to sweeten the voice and speak your truth. Turquoise helps reduce premature aging.

A few tips to get us through the Sunny Summer!

 

For Summer Colds & Stuffy Noses
Try placing 1-2 drops of Eucalyptus on a cotton ball and tuck inside your pillowcase.
For children or the elderly use Eucalyptus Smithi as the other is too harsh.

 

A Summer Cooling Recipe

With the hot summer months ahead a great recipe to try is a Peppermint and Tea Tree foot lotion.
Cooling Peppermint and the antibacterial, antifungal properties of Tea Tree make this a great summer treat. Take 8oz. of any unscented lotion, add 20 drops Peppermint, 20 drops Tea Tree and 20 drops of Rosemary essential Oil. Blend in a measuring cup and pour into a bottle.
Use as needed to revive tired feet. This blend will be energizing so you may not want to
use it to close to bedtime.

 

Deodorant Body Splash:

Vinegar–4 oz
Vodka–3 teaspoons
Grapefruit–9 drops
Lavender–5 drops
Lemon–6 drops
Peppermint–3 drops
Rosemary–4 drops
Sage–6 drops

Add to 2 cups purified water. Blend the oils together, add them to the vodka, and shake well. Let settle for half an hour, then add the vinegar and shake well. Pour mixture into 2 cups purified water and shake well. Finally, pass the liquid through a paper coffee filter. The longer you leave the essential oils in the vodka and vinegar mix before adding to the water, the stronger the scent will be.

 

Romantic Glowing Shells

Create Bergamot-scented candles that will glow all evening. Collect then thoroughly rinse seashells and add tea lights, removing out tins. Melt paraffin wax and carefully fill the seashells. Add two
to three drops of Bergamot oil to the wax, while it is still soft and melted. The fragrance will rise with the heat of the flame. Other essential oils may be used.

 

For Summer Colds with Chest Congestion

Try a steam inhalation with essential oil of Green Myrtle.  A good expectorant for respiratory complaints.

 

 

Pamper Your Feet this Summer

Regular foot massage benefits the whole body.
Here are some ideas for blends to help refresh
those tired and sometimes swollen feet.

3 drops Lavender
2 drops Chamomile
10 ml or 1/3 oz carrier oil

or
2 drops Lavender
2 drops Peppermint
in 10 ml carrier oil

If you stand on your feet all day here is
a treatment to help with swelling and circulation.
1 drop Cypress
1 drop Lavender

add to a bowl of warm water to which about 12 smooth
round pebbles have been added.

Roll the soles of your feet slowly over the pebbles
for a few minutes, then dry your feet

 

 

Summer First Aid

Keep a blend of Lavender and Tea Tree on hand
for First Aid this summer. It’s more effective
than either of the oils used alone.

 

 

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