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Book Review – The Awakened Psychic: What You Need to Know to Develop Your Psychic Abilities by Kala Ambrose

February 1st, 2018

The Awakened Psychic: What You Need to Know to Develop Your Psychic Abilities

Author Kala Ambrose

Publisher Llewellyn Publications

Copyright:2016

Length 216 Pages

I really enjoyed this book, it is a great teaching book for novices and even a great refresher for seasoned psychics.

This is the 7th book Kala Ambrose has written. She also has 3 Guided Meditation recordings available as of January 16, 2018. I love the candid way in which Kala Ambrose writes, it is a style that makes you feel that you are listening to her talk in person. She is straightforward and doesn’t really play around in the way she describes events that she has personally experienced in her life with her own abilities. Kala Ambrose has been working with and teaching students from around the world for the past 18 years. She has been working with clients, entrepreneurs, VP’s and CEOs for the past 25 years.

She has written 11 chapters in this book. All the chapters except for the last two contain exercises. The first chapter is about all the differences and nuances between the 7 different psychic abilities. I guess because I am so familiar with some of them, I didn’t even really see them as part of my own abilities that had an individual name. But, Ms. Ambrose goes through all 7 of them with a full description of each one. She gives examples of experiences she has had in her life with each one, too.

In her chapter on Empath Abilities, Kala Ambrose also goes into detail on how to work with empathic abilities, and gives some great advice on how to process the empathic feelings, so that empaths are better able to function in the world today. I liked the heading, “Benefits of Being an Empath”, within the chapter on Empathic abilities. I think so many people struggle with their abilities, they may lose sight of the blessings that it can give to them. I do think that people who have been able to work though some of the difficulties that they have, can benefit from reading this chapter.

Chapter 3 in her book covers all the other abilities that are Psychic by nature, but don’t fall under the clair title. Everything from Readings Auras, Reading Akashic Records, Mediumship and Telepathy and a few others. This was a great chapter for me as I liked her views on a Mother’s Intuition, as she states that, “Science is now discovering that what wise woman philosophy says is true.” All moms know science will catch up to what we already know about our connections with our children.

Ms. Ambrose also covers different types of divination tools and techniques, she covers dreams, astral projection. She has a chapter devoted to connecting the creative mind with the logical mind. She explains how using a vision or dream board can help to open more of the psychic abilities that you have. And how manifestation is part of our abilities that we all need to be tapping into.

Kala Ambrose wrote two chapters on defense, and working with spirits. She gives some sage advice about working with spirits. Both chapters are, in my humble opinion something that every novice or developing psychic should read and pay close attention to the advice given. It is some great advice that I was so happy to see a teacher give in a book. Too many books out there don’t give enough guidance on protection and defense of the psychic.

The last two chapters are very important for new readers and even some seasoned readers to take into consideration. It is about the Ethics of being a reader and the Responsibilities that we all need to pay attention to. I also like that she covered Standards that all readers need to have in place, so that they can remain clear of any karmic debts.

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About the Author:

Dawn Borries loves reading and was thrilled to become an E-Book reviewer for PaganPages.Org. Dawn, also, has been doing Tarot and Numerology readings for the past 25 years. Dawn does readings on her Facebook page.  If you are interested in a reading you can reach her at: https://www.facebook.com/Readings-by-Dawn-1608860142735781/

A Review of Sasha Fenton’s Fortune Teller’s Handbook

I have been a fan of Sasha Fenton for thirty years. I remember when The Fortune-Teller’s Workbook: A Practical Introduction to the World of divination first appeared at my favorite library and I borrowed it again and again. I was so happy when I found it in on Amazon.com – I snapped it up immediately. It’s the kind of basic text that any student of the divining arts ought to have, and it is perfect for beginners. Not only is it written in a clear and concise manner, it has some fun divination techniques – and who says that divination can’t be fun? – such as The Oracle of Napoleon (see http://paganpages.org/content/2015/11/seeing-the-signs-18/) and Flower Reading. According to Amazon.com, Sasha Fenton has written 125 books on divination, spiritualism and the occult. I know, as someone who hangs around libraries and book stores, her books are always on display.

(Sasha Fenton. Photo from www.redwheelweiser.com)

Apparently, The Fortune-Teller’s Workbook is out of print and hardcover copies are going for $59.99 and up on Ebay. They are increasingly hard to find, so if you happen to come across one, I suggest picking it up, if only because it’s going to be a rare and therefore increasingly hard to find – and perhaps a good investment, as well.

(My dog-earred copy)

A few months ago, I reviewed Sasha Fenton’s new edition of Fortune Telling by Tarot Cards: A Beginner’s Guide to Understanding the Tarot (see http://paganpages.org/content/2017/12/seeing-the-signs-36/). An obvious companion to this wonderful guide to reading and using the Tarot to its fullest potential, is Fortune Teller’s Handbook: 20 Fun and Easy Techniques for Predicting the Future. Published by the publisher as Fortune Telling by Tarot Cards, Hampton Woods Publishing Company, Incorporated, out of Charlottesville, Virginia, and distributed by Red Wheel/Weiser. The two books came out the same year which tells me that they were meant to be companion pieces. Both books have glossy finishes on the covers and they are the same convenient size.

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I started reading the Introduction. Immediately, I thought: this sounds familiar. I opened up to the Introduction in The Fortune-Teller’s Workbook, and there were almost the exact words. I examined the chapters on Numerology, Runes, Flower Reading and the twelve other chapters that are in both The Fortune-Teller’s Workbook and Fortune Teller’s Handbook, and in every instance, the prose was almost the same. A word or two here or there was changed and the overall syntax was tightened up. A good editor could do that.

You can’t say they’re the same book, since they both have chapters that the other one doesn’t have. But fifteen out of the twenty chapters in Fortune Teller’s Handbook were originally in The Fortune-Teller’s Workbook, which is more than half of the book. I am not making any kind of accusations here – they are both wonderful books – but really! Over half the book!

I have to say that I was very disappointed in Sasha Fenton. I guess if an author wants to plagiarize their own work, that’s their prerogative, but it seems unethical to me. At least reference your earlier work! I searched all over Fortune Teller’s Handbook to find any reference to her earlier book. There was none whatsoever.

That said – and I’m sorry but I had to say it – I still find Fortune Teller’s Handbook: 20 Fun and Easy Techniques for Predicting the Future a worthy book. Don’t let the silly cover put you off. There’s a lot of good information in here – especially for the beginner. Information that is in this book that isn’t in The Fortune-Teller’s Workbook includes Phrenology (reading the bumps on a person’s head), Face Reading, Graphology, Moles, and Itches. I thought the chapter on face reading very interesting. I had no idea there were different ways of reading a face – The Chinese Way or the English way. It makes me wonder – are there any other techniques for reading faces? Perhaps a Gypsy or Romany way? This would be a subject to research.

And I had to laugh at the chapter on Graphology. Is anyone taught how to write in longhand anymore? I know I had to teach my son how to sign his name because he only knew how to print. In an increasingly electronic world, perhaps some high-tech version of Graphology is needed? It’s an interesting idea – I’m not even sure how it would work! But I am no techie!

One thing a book like this is really great for is Bibliomancy. Yes, I know that Bibliomancy is opening a book at random and reading whatever is there – I wrote about it three years ago here http://paganpages.org/content/2015/04/seeing-the-signs-12/ – but sometimes when you are stuck with a problem, you don’t even know which form of divination to use – where to start looking for answers. A book like this opens the doors to finding the solutions. Even if all you do is open to a random page – let’s say, page 77, which is a reference page for the suit of Hearts for playing cards – I’d say, the book is telling you to pick up your playing cards – the ones you use only for divination – and do a quick 3-card spread. The first card represents your body, the second card your mind, and the third card your spirit. What are the cards saying in these positions? What are they saying to each other?

My body card was the 5 of Spades – happy home but bad-tempered people surround me. My mind card was the Queen of Spades – my witchy self. My spirit card was the Ace of Hearts – the start of a happy time in my life. I don’t see these cards talking to each other so much as merely tolerating each others presence. What is the Queen of Spades going to do with the Ace of Hearts? Shoot an arrow through it? She’s really on her eye on it, doesn’t she? At the same time, she’s watching out for those contentious 5’s behind her, threatening to cause a ruckus in her happy home. Who are these people? These 5’s? As usual, there are more questions than answers but that’s all good – it gives me something to work with. At the very least, I use those images in a poem or a collage.

Anyway – there is a lot in this book. If you are looking for a good all-around book about the various arts of divination, either for yourself or as a present for a beginning, I could not recommend this book any higher. And whether or not Sasha Fenton copied and pasted the information from an earlier book – honestly, it’s all good. When you are given a key to knowledge, don’t ask where it came from! Just take it and turn the lock and open the door!

Find Fortune Teller’s Handbook either at your local library, bookstore or on Amazon.com.

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References

Fenton, Sasha. Fortune Teller’s Handbook: 20 Fun and Easy Techniques for Predicting the Future. Charlottesville, VA: Hampton Roads Publishing Company Inc., 2017.

Fenton, Sasha. Fortune Telling by Tarot Cards: A Beginner’s Guide to Understanding the Tarot. Charlottesville, VA: Hampton Roads Publishing Company Inc., 2017.

Fenton, Sasha. The Fortune-Teller’s Workbook: A Practical Introduction to the World of divination. Wellingborough: The Aquarian Press, 1988

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About the Author:

Polly MacDavid lives in Buffalo, New York at the moment but that could easily change, since she is a gypsy at heart. Like a gypsy, she is attracted to the divinatory arts, as well as camp fires and dancing barefoot. She has three cats who all help her with her magic.

Her philosophy about religion and magic is that it must be thoroughly based in science and logic. She is Dianic Wiccan and she is solitary.

She blogs at silverapplequeen.wordpress.com. She writes about general life, politics and poetry. She is writing a novel about sex, drugs and recovery.

 

This is a lovely little book, one that can easily fit inside a woman’s bag, or a man’s briefcase.

It is broken down into two parts – The Foundations of Worship and Building Rituals.

Part One is broken down in “Prayer” and “Rituals”. It describes how, yes, pagans so pray, a description of prayer and how to write your own.

Part Two is all about Rituals

— How to Begin

— Home

— Callings

— Praise

— Thanksgiving

— Consecrations & Blessings

— Separate sections for Time of Day/Month/Year/Lore

— Endings

The last section is “Petitioning the Gods” and includes, requests, offerings, healing and society and land.

The book is chock-full of prayers for all occasions. For those who prefer to use the words of others in their rituals and daily offerings, there is much here to choose from. For others, many of these can be the base from which you craft your own prayers.

For myself, I tend to just speak from my heart in my daily prayers. However, I can definitely see myself referring to this book again and again in composing more formal rituals.

This little book would make a nice addition to your occult library.

 

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About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis, the Egyptian Goddess”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is [email protected]

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Book review

The Witches’ Almanac, Issue 36

Water: Our Primal Source

Published by the Witches’ Almanac Ltd.

almanac

This almanac, founded in 1971, has become a traditional pagan reference. It starts with the beginning of the astrological year, running from Spring 2016-17. Its theme is water; the current year’s theme is air.

One of the parts I find most useful is the moon calendar noting the moon’s phases and place in the zodiac. I also enjoy the year’s astrological forecasts for each zodiac sign, beginning with the vernal equinox. Each two-page spread touches on highlights for the year, health, love, spirituality and finance.

Other reference information includes astrological keys, eclipses, retrograde planetary motion and how to plant by the phases of the moon. While all this information is available somewhere online, it’s nice to have it all in one place you can trust.

The rest of the 206 pages are a collection of ancient lore and legends, trivia and wisdom. Among this issue’s lineup of obscure topics are “Waynaboozhoo: The Great Flood Story of the Ojibwa – A traditional tale of good and evil,” “The Margate Grotto: A Mystery Spelled in Shells,” and “The Singing Tower and Spook Hill: A Sacred Journey though Old Florida.”

The almanac’s short articles present a mix of perspectives and traditions; with more than 40, there is sure to be something of interest to you. Black-and-white images appear on nearly every page.

If you use the moon at all in your practice, you’ll be reaching for this again and again.

Daily Spellbook for the Good Witch: Quick, Simple and Practical Magic for Every Day of the Year”

 

 

by Patti Wigington

Published by Sterling Ethos

Published: 2017

Pages: 385

Begin a year and a day of witching with the help of the “Daily Spellbook for the Good Witch.” Starting with January’s themes of new beginnings and going though December’s focus on winter’s darkness, High Priestess, Wicca expert and author Patti Wigington presents 366 spells for seasons, moons and astrological signs. Included are spells for protection, abundance, gratitude, blessings and divination.

While she notes at the beginning of the book that people often think you need a lot of supplies to do spell work – you don’t. Knowing others may think differently, I like that she points out you can do a lot of magic with things you find around you. Many of the spells I read required very little. For instance, the King Frost Snow Spell for Neighborhood Harmony required you to make snowmen while chanting, and adorn each with sticks for arms, a carrot for the nose, and whatever hats or scarves were handy. A spell to find new friends calls for nine seashells and an orange candle.

Wigington’s spells use batteries and a piece of red fabric to jump start your love life; and silver paper, a pen and mugwort for dreams to answer a question; and crayons and a new coloring book for creative thinking. She’ll tell you how to make a nine-piece divination set from painted rocks and prosperity poppets out of gingerbread dough.

None of the spells are long and involved, so it would be possible to set aside 5 to maybe 20 minutes and do a spell a day. Some may not resonate for you – not everyone needs a spell to gain professional respect, male potency or to pass a test. I wouldn’t personally recommend the love spells, including one to bring back a lover who has strayed or the Stay With Me Spell because they interfere with someone else’s freewill, and I don’t know that I’d bring a firefly into the house to help me find a lost object.

There were many, however, I did like. One is the Spell to Bless a Freshly Planted Garden presented on May 29 in conjunction with the old agricultural festival of Ambarvalia, Wigington instructs you to mix equal parts milk, honey and wine in a bowl and walk around your garden clockwise, using your fingers to sprinkle the mixture on the soil while saying, “Honey for the bees, wine for the Divine and milk for growth in this garden of mine.”

This book will easily help you bring more magic into your life, and there’s no reason it can’t be used a second or third time, or serve as a reference for the spells you found most successful. It could also be gifted to a new witch every year, made more personal if you jotted notes in the margins.

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About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

The Modern Witchcraft Guide to the Wheel of the Year: From Samhain to Yule, Your Guide to the Wiccan Holidays”

by Judy Ann Nock

Publisher: Adams Media

Date: 2017

Pages: 238

Available at Barnes & Noble, Target and elsewhere in hardcover, NOOK Book, Kindle, etc.

This book from the Modern Witchcraft series is essentially a reprint of Judy Ann Nock’s “The Provenance Press Guide to the Wiccan Year: A Year Round Guide to Spells, Rituals, and Holiday Celebrations,” published in 2007. There is a new introduction and minor word changes, but then, the wheel of the year and the night sky have changed little from ancient times, and the book does provides quality information.

Each chapter focuses on a season that corresponds to a pagan holiday. Nock provides an introduction, an explanation of the sabbat, a description of the night sky for that period, the astrological influences and mythological references.

Searching for inspiration for an Imbolc ritual, that is the chapter I read most throughly. Noting that in arcane astrology, Imbolc fell under the sign of Aquarius, she connects the returning light of the sun and Brighid’s fire aspect, and the image of the water bearer with Brighid’s sacred wells.

There are spells, rituals, crafts and other suggestions for celebrating each season. For Imbolc is a meditation delving into the healing waters of Brighid’s sacred well, which is symbolic of the depths of the womb from which we all come. There is an eclectic initiatory rite suitable for a coven, and a scrying ritual that can be done as a solitary. The crafts are Brighid’s cross, Brighid’s eye (also known as God’s eye) and the bride’s bed.

The book begins with Samhain and moves through Mabon, providing a guide to celebrate every turn of the wheel. Reading it, it’s easy to see how the 360 degrees of a circle overlay easily on a 365-day calendar. While the majority of the book focuses on solar influences, there is a chapter on the estates with a lunar calendar, astrology and meditations with the moon goddess. The appendix has correspondences and a glossary of terms.

This book would be helpful to anyone wanting to learn about the Wheel of the Year, and serves as a reference to return to again and again.

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Nock is a Wiccan high priestess and founder of a goddess spirituality group. She lives in New York City and has a degree in creative writing and theater. Another book by her will be coming out this year, “The Modern Witchcraft Book of Natural Magick: Your Guide to Crafting Charms, Rituals, and Spells from the Natural World.” She also wrote “A Witch’s Grimoire: Create Your Own Book of Shadows.”

Click Images For Amazon Information

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About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

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