Interviews & Reviews

Review of the Book ‘Waking the Witch’ & Interview with Author Pam Grossman

July, 2019

Waking the Witch
by Pam Grossman

Waking the Witch by Pam Grossman has a decidedly different “feel” than most of the books currently on the market about Witches, Witchcraft and what it means to be a Witch in the 21st century. Her academic background of a degree in cultural anthropology with minors in art history, creative writing and comparative religion has served her well in crafting a book that is beautifully woven with very thorough research and on point references that are easily recognizable by anyone reading.

Waking the Witch begins with the traditional Introduction, is separated into eight (8) chapters and ends with the “Afterwyrd”, a purposeful play on words and apt ending to the journey laid out. Each of these offerings is rich in contemporary reference that evolves from well researched historical references that brought to light many nuances of the why’s, and where’s of identity of the Witch that I would venture to guess many are not aware of. The result is one of being able to engage both the seasoned practitioner and the seeker new to the path in ways that are relevant, thought-provoking and empowering.

What Ms. Grossman finished in approximately a year and a half until completion is clearly a reflection of a lifetime of experience, reading, learning and research that has produced the clarity of intention and a distinctly palpable feeling in Waking the Witch.

I particularly appreciated the content of Chapter 1: The Good, the Bad and the Wicked,which sets the tone for what follows with a lengthy and very in-depth introduction to the archetype of the Witch that has pervaded much of our cultural bias and misunderstanding of what a Witch is. Ms. Grossman brings to light the impact that the book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum and its concept of the “good” Witch and the “bad” Witch laid as the groundwork for an enduring and over simplified polarity of positive and negative. We learn that this classic tome was not only influential in its archetyping of the witch, but that the author himself had long been interested and (part) of spiritual practice and philosophies as a theosophist. Add to this Ms. Grossman’s introduction to the reader of the first threads of her alignment of the Feminist component of the Witch….

… It’s a spectacular story, not only as a parable about friendship and truth-seeking, but also due to its exceptional originality. The Emerald City, the

Yellow Brick Road, magical slippers, a brave farm-girl protagonist, and

of course, the good and bad witches are all now seemingly timeless

icons from what some have called “the first American fairy tale.”

But several of these ideas were not invented by Baum ….

In fact, a great many of them can be traced to the influence

of his mother-in-law, the suffragist and equal rights

pioneer Matilda Joslyn Gage…(Chapter 1)

We go on to learn more about Gage and the overlapping of the efforts of the suffragists and abolitionists, theosophy’s philosophies and the far reaching effects of these on society’s concepts of power; specifically feminine empowerment.

Finishing this chapter, my curiosity was piqued. So, when the opportunity to speak at length with Ms. Grossman about this treasure of a book, saying yes meant looking behind the curtain to reveal the Witch who was in control and find out a bit more about her thoughts, hopes and intentions in writing Waking the Witch. These are some of the key points from our conversation.

Ms. Grossman’s book takes a deep look into the Feminist ideology and identification and how many of these are the same assignations given to the Witch as their individual underpinnings tread a similar path. I wanted to dive a little more deeply into her experience as a feminist and as a Witch.

Robin Fennelly (RF): There are many different layers to the word “Feminist”. What does being a Feminist mean to you?

Pam Grossman (PG): I was raised to believe that the definition of a feminist is simply to believe that people of all genders should have equal worth and therefore should be treated equally. And, it really is that simple. Now, there are others who use the word “womanist” or “humanist”. I realized there are associations with the feminist movement, especially those who believed the second wave of the movement was for middle-class white straight women and so for some the word feminist is not their favorite word.

RF: When we hear the word “Feminist” automatically a specific gender comes mind, versus the polarities offered. How does that fall into gender identity?

PG: I think it is a word that has evolved. A third wave of feminists was what I grew up to know in the nineties. And, now we are allegedly experiencing the fourth wave which is more intersectional and driven by digital communities and dialogues. So, it is a word that is really important to me because just like the word “Witch” people have for so long tried to shame those of us who have chosen to describe ourselves as such. I am really glad that we have moved past the stereotypical image of a feminist and it is now more inclusive of all genders and preferences.

RF: How do you see this evolving?

PG: I feel the big drive for Feminism and Witchcraft alike has to be about us being as compassionate and intersexual and interconnected as possible. And that means both honoring your individual experience and your background. This means not saying we are all the same, because we aren’t. We all have different amounts of privilege we are born with. We all have different amounts of pain we are born with. So, I don’t think it is correct to say that we are all the same, and therefore we should never talk about how we are different. I think what we need to do is listen to each other and honor one another’s differences while at the same time celebrating the larger values of humanity (as a whole) that I believe we all need to be fighting for together.

(The humanities flow strongly through this book and are used as a vehicle for highlighting the influence culture has on our perceptions. This thought process is clearly evidenced in the subtleties of application of the product of these two worlds of overlap giving new meaning to the conceptualization of the archetype, the semantics and the deeper meanings of the Witch. Using this format, Ms. Grossman provides us with enough evidence that you can find the Witch in most anything whether transparent or in all of her power. I was curious about the development of these sensibilities in Ms. Grossman’s own experience and her choice in using the arts so prominently in her book.)

RF: When did the synthesis of these ideas emerge for you and take shape?

PG: It has been a gradual evolution. But, the first group of artists who really opened my eyes to the fact that art could be magic, and vice-versa were the female surrealists. I fell in love with the work of Remedios Varo and Leonora Carrington when I was a teenager. Another major influence was the book, “Women ists and the Surrealist Movement” by author Whitney Chadwick. I happened upon this book in the gift shop of the Metropolitan Museum at the age of fourteen and it just blew my mind. Through these images it was as though they (Varo and Carrington) were painting the stories of the fairy tales and myths that I loved, but adding their own personal details to them; making it almost autobiographical. This became the big key for me with the realization that you could make works of art and infuse them with magical intention and magical truths, and in doing so it would occupy this nether space between art and magic where the two overlapped.

(In Chapter 6: The Dark s: Magic Makers and Craft Women, Ms. Grossman delves more deeply into the world of art and its influence in our perceptions of the Witch and her depiction. In what she calls the “magico-artistic” family tree she includes five women who exemplify the uniting of art and the craft. I wanted to know more about this alignment.)

RF: You talk about the word craft and its deeper meaning to you as a synthesis of arts and magick. Could you speak more to that?

PG: I love the fact that this word can be used when it comes to making art, but it is also part of “Witchcraft”, and some people say we are “crafting” our own lives. To me it means working with intention and focus and being actively in relationship with the work. So it is neither passive such as…”I am simply a receptacle for something”, but it is also not completely based in the ego, ie: “I am responsible for all of this”. I think craft implies that it is part of you and part of the divine or at least coming from an unconscious base and that you are actively working with it with intention and with the idea that it can grow and evolve as a living, fluid system.

(Throughout Waking the Witch, Ms. Grossman really drives home the concept of the Witch as a truly Universal Archetype that can be found throughout many cultures and spiritual practices. Staying with that idea, I wanted to know more.)

RF: How do you see or perceive some of the now popular Eastern practices aligning with what your definition of the Witch is?

PG: I feel they are very relevant. In the book, I am writing about the Witch archetypally and sometimes that archetype is just a character in a film, or can be someone’s political stance as a feminist or it can have many other meanings. But, I am also a practitioner and it was important to represent that too. When I say I am a Witch, sometimes I mean that as a metaphor and sometimes I mean it literally. I cast spells. I am pagan. I have an altar. A lot of practices I have learned, certainly meditation, any type of body-work, such as yoga or any of the things popularized through the “New Age“ movement, I have incorporated into my own practice. I am certainly using more of the Western Witch (British Witch) as an archetype, because that portrayal is one that most people associate the Witch with.

(As our conversation neared conclusion and my reading of the book felt like the first reading of what would become a frequently returned to favorite, I was intrigued about the origin of the title. Being “woke” has been used in a variety of ways and I didn’t have a sense that this was yet another derivation of that word’s intention. So, inquiring minds wanted to know.)

RF: Why did you choose the title of “Waking the Witch” for this book?

PG: “Waking the Witch” is a song by Kate Bush that I really love. So, it is a wink to her and that song. But, what she is really referencing is a really dark bit of witch history. During the witch craze in Europe and later in the New England colonies one of the ways to get confessions from accused witches was to torture them. And one of the forms of torture was sleep deprivation. You would wake them in the middle of the night and ask them all of your questions and if they were tired and weak enough they may confess to being a witch. So, it does have a really dark connotation. I love reclaiming dark things and making them sparkle but it really is more of a multi-layered meaning.

I am also seeing more and more people in my life and in society waking up to their own power, and their potential. And, many of them are gravitating towards Witchcraft or some sort of magical expression, or an alternative spiritual practice. I don’t believe that everyone has to be a Witch, but I do believe that this waking up and raising of consciousness is a really crucial one for us all to become better citizens of this planet if we want a future of sustainability and the type of societies we desire to rebuild we need people to awaken spirituality. Love really is the answer. Loving our planet, the bodies we are in and the people who share this world. So, the title, “Waking the Witch”, really gives me a lot of hope and the idea that people are waking up to what I hope to be a new chapter of humanity.

(My sense after hearing this explanation is that Ms. Grossman has offered an opportunity to the reader to uncover the bits and pieces of our memory of those deeper connections with the Witch and give a poke to what can be the evolution of that reclaiming of power within oneself and the writing of a new history and archetype. In keeping with her thoughts I wanted to know what she envisioned for us collectively.)

RF: What do you feel we could do as a collective (community) to empower the feminine and awaken this power to change those beliefs and challenges that are failing us?

PG: One thing that I find frustrating about those who purport to be spiritual or get involved in Witchcraft for a sense of self-empowerment. That’s great, but it won’t get you very far unless you take that empowerment and healing and make use of it to be in service to something greater than just yourself. I believe a lot of people are attracted to alternative spirituality because they need healing and to be told that they are valuable because our governments, religious structures and businesses don’t currently support the fact that people of all genders, backgrounds or sexual orientation are of equal worth. So I understand why Witchcraft is very attractive. But that is just step one and we need to then talk about what is next. To me the what’s next is connecting to other people and being of service to them, the planet and all that inhabits this space with us, seen and unseen.

To quote from the Afterwyrd (coming from the word “wryd” which means fate personified or the Anglo-Saxon view of personal destiny), Ms. Grossman offers up her vision of the destiny of the Witch…

The redemption of witches and the ascension of women will be

forever interlinked. That both are happening at this moment

in time is no coincidence. Each is a reflection of the other.

And, so my last question to her was a reflection of this.

RF: What would you say to someone picking up your book for the first time and unfamiliar with the Witch, the Feminist and the practice of Witchcraft?

PG: Everything matters greatly and, that we shouldn’t take anything too seriously. That there is a sense of sacred reverence needed, and play that is equally holy too. There are those who get lost in the gate keeping of Witchcraft and the stance of the Witch and Witchcraft having to be very tightly structured and restrictive in the do’s and don’ts of what is acceptable and what makes you a “Real” Witch. There is no room or flexibility to enjoy the mysteries and the unknowable. I think that so much of life is standing in mystery and not knowing everything and being open to continuing to use our imaginations to keep remaking the world. And because of that we can have fun as Witches and practitioners of the craft and continue to grow and evolve into our place of power.

I thoroughly enjoyed speaking with Ms. Grossman about her book, Waking the Witch. The book is dense with information and insights and much has been left out of this review as it is a work to be experienced and savored in its complexity and breadth of reach. One comes away from the reading realizing this is both a cautionary tale and a text for those who choose to step up in a way that is very empowering but also very pragmatic and practical in its use in a modern and continually evolving world.

Our conversation ended with my request for what Ms. Grossman would like to share about the writing of her book…

PG: Although I may not call myself Wiccan, I still owe such a debt of gratitude to all of the writers and amazing creative spirits who came before and the rich history they have preserved and created. I have learned so much from earlier writers and generations and I hope that this book honors them too. I hope this is a continuum of a conversation we have been having for a long time and I hope people who have grown up with a Wiccan or Pagan practice will feel honored and included too.

I believe this final statement sums up the overall hope and inspiration that flows throughout Waking the Witch. That being one of not simply a story about how the Witch came to be, but how intimately woven that word and all of its aligning descriptors are a model for the potential we have as humanity for change, resilience and growth once we allow ourselves to awaken to the possibilities.

Links to Other Goodies FromPam Grossman:

Visit the author’s web page:

www.pamgrossman.com

The Witch Wave Podcast

Witchwavepodcast.com/

WitchEmoji

The #1 iMessage sticker pack for all of your Witchy needs.  It contains Witches, spell craft objects, familiars, and magic symbols in a variety of skin tones and colors.  Let WitchEmoji help make your texts more magical.

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Waking the Witch: Reflections on Women, Magic, and Power on Amazon

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About the Author:

Robin Fennelly is a Wiccan High Priestess, teacher, poet and author.

She is the author of (click on book titles for more information):

The Inner Chamber Volume One on Amazon

It’s Written in the Stars

Astrology

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Two

poetry of the Spheres (Volume 2) on Amazon

Qabalah

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Three

Awakening the Paths on Amazon

Qabalah

A Year With Gaia on Amazon

The Eternal Cord

Temple of the Sun and Moon on Amazon

Luminous Devotions

The Magickal Pen Volume One (Volume 1) on Amazon

A Collection of Esoteric Writings

The Elemental Year on Amazon

Aligning the Parts of SELF

The Enchanted Gate on Amazon

Musings on the Magick of the Natural World

Sleeping with the Goddess on Amazon

Nights of Devotion

A Weekly Reflection on Amazon

Musings for the Year

Her books are available on Amazon or on this website and her Blogs can be found atRobin Fennelly 

Follow Robin on Instagram & Facebook.

Book Review – Field Guide to the Spirit World: The Science of Angel Power, Discarnate Entities and Demonic Possession by Susan Martinez, Ph.D.

July, 2019

Book Review
Field Guide to the Spirit World
The Science of Angel Power, Discarnate Entities and Demonic Possession
by Susan Martinez, Ph.D.

It is always interesting to me to read books regarding the occult/paranormal/esoteric that are written by those scientific academics that offer the opportunity to confirm the alliance between science and the spiritual/magickal. As the sub-title suggests, Field Guide to the Spirit World: The Science of Angel Power, Discarnate Entities and Demonic Possession does a fine job of forming a dialogue between the confirmable and the unknowable. The book’s author, Susan Martinez, Ph.D. holds a doctorate in anthropology from Columbia University, the perfect foundational ground from which to explore the realms of spirits and ephemeral beings. And, as would be expected the bibliography is diverse in selections from the scientific community and those luminaries within the paranormal community.

… I have long been writing to prove that the spirit world is

not an invented thing, but a reality with which

we have fallen out of touch…1.

In reading Field Guide to the Spirit World we are brought to the realization that many of the mental/medical conditions for which there have been no rational explanation are often misdiagnosed and remain untreated, save for those few who look deeper and at the very least raise the question of inquiry into otherworldly sources. Conversely there have been cases of true illness that has gone untreated being subscribed to possession, overshadowing or more. And, the futile attempts made by one who does not have the scientific knowledge has caused death on more than one occasion.

Field Guide to the Spirit World is divided into eleven (11) chapters and concludes with three (3) appendices that encapsulate some of the core concepts. The title itself is indicative of a scientific journey into lesser-known territories and such is the case as you move through each of these chapters. What you may have already believed to be the truth of the Spirit Realms, Death and Demons is further dissected with case studies, valid scientific correlates and a healthy does of respect for what in ineffable and fleetingly complex in its very nature.

We are introduced to some familiar diagnoses such as PTSD, OCD, multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, autism, epilepsy, to name a few and the general sense of Dr. Martinez is that these are often times a combination of personality/consciousness and manipulation from entities.

I am not entirely clear who the intended audience is for Field Guide to the Spirit World as it felt to be a selection that could add more clarity to those engaged in the world of wellness and add a differing perspective to those who work with Spirits in whatever way they have been trained. Coming more from the practitioner side vs. the scientific, it was an interesting read, although I did not necessarily agree with all of the premises. The problem being, that there are subtle nuances to any of this work that can’t be measured or that don’t clearly map to symptoms and patterns regardless of the seeming patterns provided by multi-case studies. And, just as there are frequent patients who don’t fit the mold, the same is true of the limited knowledge we have of the who’s who and what’s what in the realms of spirits and other discarnate beings. All in all, it is obvious that a lot of research and time went into the crafting of this book and I honor the bridging of the concrete and the mysterious.

Footnotes:

1. p. 3

***

About the Author:

Robin Fennelly is a Wiccan High Priestess, teacher, poet and author.

She is the author of (click on book titles for more information):

The Inner Chamber Volume One on Amazon

It’s Written in the Stars

Astrology

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Two

poetry of the Spheres (Volume 2) on Amazon

Qabalah

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Three

Awakening the Paths on Amazon

Qabalah

A Year With Gaia on Amazon

The Eternal Cord

Temple of the Sun and Moon on Amazon

Luminous Devotions

The Magickal Pen Volume One (Volume 1) on Amazon

A Collection of Esoteric Writings

The Elemental Year on Amazon

Aligning the Parts of SELF

The Enchanted Gate on Amazon

Musings on the Magick of the Natural World

Sleeping with the Goddess on Amazon

Nights of Devotion

A Weekly Reflection on Amazon

Musings for the Year

Her books are available on Amazon or on this website and her Blogs can be found atRobin Fennelly 

Follow Robin on Instagram & Facebook.

Interview with Reanna of Woodland Wand Creation

July, 2019

Bright Blessings!

Last month, I got to review a great wand by Lady Reanna Shellenbarger of Woodland Wand Creation, and this month, I lucked into an interview!

Here is the link to my review if you did not have a chance to read it yet!

Read on to learn more about this amazing artist and creatrix, and her sacred, beautiful wands!

On their Facebook page, it says:

“Welcome friends to my store called Woodland Wand Creation. A magical place of semiprecious stones & enchanting wood from the magical forest. All to make amazing Wands. All work is unique artwork. No two are the same. I work within the respect to our Ecosystem. Many of my pieces are created with natural and reclaimed supplies. Wood is collected with respect and reverence. All wood is render by the tree naturally after stormy weather. No tree is ever harmed or wood cut from trees. My artwork & Wands are said to be very powerful. Because I work and charge all pieces by the moon light for an extra punch of energy.

Bert is the engine and Reanna is the artist. Together we are Woodland Wand Creation. All items are made by Reanna she is such the artist. We hope you all enjoy them as much as we do.”

Then, I got to catch up with Reanna, and she told me wonderful things!

Saoirse- How and why did you get into making your beautiful wands? What or who inspired you?

Reanna- A friend of mine purchased a bag of random semiprecious stones and had no idea of what to do with them. so I took some of the stones home and fashioned a Wand, not knowing if it would even work. well, needless to say, it did, and here I am today.

Saoirse- How does this tie in with your personal spiritual path, and what would you like to share about your path with us?

Reanna- I studied Wicca some years ago. I reached High Priestess status. today I’m solitary but very, very social. I found more freedom by dedicating myself to more creative pursuits. As a Libra, I require the freedom to go with what the wind calls to me and what strikes my fancy.

Saoirse- Tell me about your creative process. How do you get an idea that inspires? What types of materials draw you? What colors? How do you begin, and how long does it usually take from start to finish?

Reanna- Each stone or branch tells me their desire to become something more. I then clean them up a bit by removing the bark, to show off the natural beauty of the wood. I work with only naturally rendered woods, like after storms and such. I never cut or hurt a tree. I still go for the random mix of stones to this very day. I meditate while I divide them up into the kinds of stones they are. I can then hear them speak to me about their desire. Some stones want to be a Staff, Smudge fan or a Rattle. I am blessed with a wide range of woods in my area. White Willow is my all time favorite, but I do work with Wise Oak, Red Elm, Sweet Maple, and Driftwood.

Saoirse- Tell about how you run your business and how and why you decided to sell as opposed to just making your own? Talk about your business partners!

Reanna- I work with my longtime partner Bert. Bert is my online Wizard. the engine to my inspiration. We are the perfect team. We have a small shop on Etsy. We also are on social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. I will provide links below.

Saoirse- Tell about yourself aside from your path and wands.

Reanna- I enjoy cooking and making up my own recipes. I like to sew children’s blankets and quilts that I donate to the local church. I really like to gardening, growing herbs, flowers and playing in my Fairy garden. I dabble in painting. I like to recycle items to keep them out of the landfills so most of my stuff is up-cycled. I also work with many divination tools such as Tarot, Crystal balls, Zodiac- natal charts, Tea leaves, and Pendulums. I write memes about magick for FB as well as some really bad poetry. I teach the basic of Tarot and Wicca in a FB group. well, I guess I’m just your all-around crafty Witch.

Saoirse- My editor noticed your fair pricing. Many merchants charge a lot more for a wand than you do. Why do you charge what you do as opposed to what many of your competitors do?

Reanna- Well, we did our homework on the prices before we set out. We saw that so many are over priced for just the simplest items. We did not want to rip off the Pagan community like this. We feel magick knowledge should not be misused by over pricing. To us, it seemed so unfair and it gives our movement such a bad name in a time when we are rising out of the shadows. Our intention was to sell a good product at a good price. Honest and true is the only way to a secure future. In this simple and humble way, a Wand can be in many hands.

Shared here are some links where you can find Reanna’s amazing goods, and have some for yourself!

This is Reanna’s FB

This is Bert’s FB

This is the Etsy shop

Their Woodland Wand Creation FB

This is their Pinterest link

And Their Twitter Link

***

About the Author:

Saoirse is a recovered Catholic.  I was called to the Old Ways at age 11, but I thought I was just fascinated with folklore. At age 19, I was called again, but I thought I was just a history buff, and could not explain the soul yearnings I got when I saw images of the Standing Stones in the Motherland. At age 29, I crossed over into New Age studies, and finally Wicca a couple years later. My name is Saoirse, pronounced like (Sare) and (Shah) Gaelic for freedom. The gods I serve are Odin and Nerthus. I speak with Freyja , Norder, and Thunor as well. The Bawon has been with me since I was a small child, and Rangda has been with me since the days I was still Catholic. I received my 0 and 1 Degree in an Eclectic Wiccan tradition, and my Elder is Lord Shadow. We practice in Columbus, Ohio. I am currently focusing more on my personal growth, and working towards a Second and Third Degree with Shadow. I received a writing degree from Otterbein University back in 2000. I have written arts columns for the s Council in Westerville. I give private tarot readings and can be reached through my Facebook page Tarot with Saoirse. You can, also, join me on my Youtube Channel.

Book Review – Find Your Happy: Daily Mantras by Shannon Kaiser

July, 2019

Book Review
Find Your Happy
Daily Mantras
by Shannon Kaiser

Find Your Happy: Daily Mantras: 365 Days of Motivation For a Happy, Peaceful and Fulfilling Life is one of the most positive books I have had the pleasure of reading in a long time. Published by Beyond Words Publishing, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc., this book is designed to be a daily reader of wisdom and motivation. However, I read it within forty-eight hours. It’s a really great book!

One of the things I like about it is that there are no dates attached to the daily mantras. Day 1 is entitled “I Am Abundant And Secure” (Kaiser, 1) with two paragraphs explaining how to focus on abundance and how to bring abundance into your life. However, unlike so many other daily meditation or mantra books, Day 1 isn’t January 1 – it’s whatever Day 1 you happen to open the book and start this journey.

There are so many gems in this book. Day 113 is “Self-Love Is A Practice I Show Up For Daily.” Kaiser writes, “Self-love is not selfish, nor is it something that just happens. It is a practice…When you show up for yourself each day, your life becomes more manageable because you are more grounded and balanced.” (Kaiser, 117). Also: Day 152 with “I’ve Done Nothing Wrong”. “Instead of thinking things didn’t work out, start celebrating how things have fallen into place…Forgive yourself and know that you did the best you could with what you knew at the time.” (Kaiser, 157)

There are affirmations for each day. “I smile confidently and with great love.” and “We are all connected and a smile brings us closer” are some of the affirmations for Day 273, which is entitled “I Smile At Strangers” (Kaiser, 283). Any one day offers an affirmation that can be taken with you for the entire day as a personal power thought. The affirmations for Day 189, “Just Because It Hasn’t Been Done Doesn’t Mean It Can’t Be” are perfect for this kind of thing: “I am a force of energy and focus.” or: “When I put my mind to something I desire, it will come true.” (Kaiser, 196)

Each day follows up with questions for the day. For instance, Day 245 is “I Start Each Day With A Grateful Heart”. After the small sermon and the affirmations, Kaiser poses the question: “How can I cultivate a morning gratitude practice?” (Kaiser, 254). Day 80 has the lovely title of “I Love My Body Because Of What It Has Overcome” and asks, “How can I send light and love to every cell of my body?” (Kaiser, 83). Indeed.

There are 365 days of these gems and jewels… they most certainly are! Read them one day at a time or read them within a two-day period like I did or skip around the book to find the wisdom that resonates most readily with your own reality. You won’t be disappointed with what you find within the covers of this book.

Shannon Kaiser’s website is HERE. There are plenty of things to see on her site check it out!

There is also “Find Your Happy” Oracle Card set! Pagan Pages writer Robin Fennelly wrote a review of the set a few months ago. If you haven’t read it, you can read it HERE.

I would personally love to get this deck someday!

So go to your favorite local bookstore or buy on your favorite online store – mine is Thriftbooks.com – and purchase this very helpful and holistic book filled with wisdom and healing. I can’t recommend it enough.

Brightest Blessings!

Find Your Happy Daily Mantras on Amazon

References

Kaiser, Shannon. Find Your Happy: Daily Mantras: 365 Days of Motivation For A Happy, Peaceful, And Fulfilling Life. Hillsboro, OR: Beyond Worlds Publishing, 2018.

https://www.playwiththeworld.com/

PaganPagesOrg Review of The 365 Find Your Happy Mantra Deck

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About the Author:

Polly MacDavid lives in Buffalo, New York at the moment but that could easily change, since she is a gypsy at heart. Like a gypsy, she is attracted to the divinatory arts, as well as camp fires and dancing barefoot. She has three cats who all help her with her magic.

Her philosophy about religion and magic is that it must be thoroughly based in science and logic. She is Dianic Wiccan and she is solitary.

She blogs at silverapplequeen.wordpress.com. She writes about general life, politics and poetry. She is writing a novel about sex, drugs and recovery.

Book Review – Tarot and the Archetypal Journey: The Jungian Path from Darkness to Light by Sallie Nichols

July, 2019

Book Review
Tarot and the Archetypal Journey
The Jungian Path from Darkness to Light
by Sallie Nichols

Tarot and the Archetypal Journey: The Jungian Path from Darkness to Light by Sallie Nichols. Originally published as “Jung and the Tarot” with a 1980 copyright, and republished in 2019 by Red Wheel/Weiser, LLC, 65 Parker Street, Suite 7, Newburyport, MA 01950. This is a 6 inch by 9 inch soft cover book with a matte color illustration on the front cover and a book description on the back cover. There are 398 pages with somewhat small black typeface printed on white paper; the quality of the printing is somewhat inferior, which could be why the images are not very clear and appear to be reprinted rather than original images. Tarot and the Archetypal Journey follows the Journey of the Fool through the Major Arcana and explores the connection between Tarot imagery and Jung’s archetypes.

We begin with a forward by Mary K. Greer and an introduction by Laurens van der Post. Then we dive right into one of those amazing rabbit holes one encounters whenever we delve a bit deeper into the Tarot. If you read nothing else in this book, the first two chapters, “Introduction to the Tarot” and “Map of the Journey” will bring powerful insight into the Tarot Majors/archetypes connection. But definitely don’t stop there or you will miss the meat of the book.

Nichols has chosen the Marseilles Tarot (one of the oldest designs) as her focus for this book, and that makes sense if we are exploring traditional Tarot imagery and symbolism. What makes the Marseilles Tarot a particularly valuable teaching tool for exploring the subconscious is this deck does not come with a traditional LWB or companion book; thus we can’t fall back on explanations conveniently provided by others but must find our own.

Despite the fact that Jung himself did not write much about the Tarot, Nichols has been able to offer an average of 7 to 15 pages dedicated to each of the 22 Major Arcana cards, offering images, symbolism, history, connections to other cards, and an in-depth explanation of the effects of the card’s corresponding archetype. That is a total of 345 pages of information! For example, there are 12 pages and two images in the section dedicated to the 16th card of the Majors, titled The Tower of Destruction: The Stroke of Liberation. Nichols speaks of the Biblical associations with this card, the association between lightning and a spiritual message, possible psychological interpretations for the figures falling from the tower, comparisons to contemplate with the images in The Magician, The Emperor, The Pope, The Popess (The High Priestess), The Hermit, The Hanged Man and The Devil.

After the detailed descriptions of the Major Arcana cards there is a chapter offering information about using the cards, an explanation of a Nine-Card Tarot Oracle Spread, some definitions, and references identifying the many images and direct quotes presented within this book.

This is not a how-to-read-the Tarot book, not necessarily a beginner’s book. It is a way to understand the power of Jungian archetypes in combination with the symbolism of the Major Arcana, how to understand them and use their power for personal evolution, and how to identify their effects in order to lessen their hold upon our lives. Nichols explains that once we begin to pay attention in this way to the characters inhabiting the Major Arcana, they will begin to pop up with regularity in our lives, offering us opportunities to get in touch in a more personal way with our cards and our psyche.

I am happy to have this book on my Tarot bookshelf; not that it will spend much time there. I’ll be reading it, often. I will be anticipating the effects of the cards and the archetypes on my daily life. After all, according to Sallie Nichols, “Strange things can happen when one confronts an archetype.”

Tarot and the Archetypal Journey: The Jungian Path from Darkness to Light on Amazon

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About the Author:

Raushanna is a lifetime resident of New Jersey. As well as a professional Tarot Reader and Teacher, she is a practicing Wiccan (Third Degree, Sacred Mists Coven), a Usui Reiki Master/Teacher, a certified Vedic Thai-Yoga Massage Bodyworker, a 500-hr RYT Yoga Teacher specializing in chair assisted Yoga for movement disorders, and a Middle Eastern dance performer, choreographer and teacher.  Raushanna bought her first Tarot deck in 2005, and was instantly captivated by the images on the cards and the vast, deep and textured messages to be gleaned from their symbols. She loves reading about, writing about, and talking about the Tarot, and anything occult, mystical, or spiritual, as well as anything connected to the human subtle body. She has published a book, “The Emerald Tablet: My 24-Day Journal to Understanding,” and is currently working on a book about the Tarot, pathworking and the Tree of Life. Raushanna documents her experiences and her daily card throws in her blog, DancingSparkles.blogspot.com, which has been in existence since 2009. She and her husband, her son and step son, and her numerous friends and large extended family can often be found on the beaches, bike paths and hiking trails of the Cape May, NJ area.

The Emerald Tablet: My 24-Day Journal to Understanding on Amazon

Book Review – Psychedlic Mysteries of the Feminine Edited by Maria Papaspyrou, Chiara Baldini & David Luke

July, 2019

Book Review
Psychedelic Mysteries of the Feminine
Edited by Maria Papaspyrou, Chiara Baldini & David Luke
Foreword by Allyson Grey
332 pp.
Park Street Press

In “Psychedelic Mysteries of the Feminine,” a diverse group of authors, artists, historians, scientists, ecologists, herbalists, shamans, poets, doctors, lawyers, and therapists deliver an interdisciplinary message of hope and healing for our traumatized and increasingly poisoned world. This book is a well-balanced collection of essays which draw on a large number of original sources and academia to explore the history of feminine themes in the tradition and usage of psychedelic pharmaka, from beer and cannabis to ayahuasca and LSD.

“Psychedelic Mysteries of the Feminine” is the product of several speakers and organizers for the Women’s Visionary Congress, an organization which disseminates harm reduction information and gathers women together from all over the world to discuss the role of psychedelics in their lives and our changing world. While the Women’s Visionary Congress (WVC) is mentioned several times, and the book includes one essay that is primarily about the WVC, the whole book is much more than just an advertisement for them or their core message.

The psychological narrative of the book includes discussion of Jungian archetypes of women as earth mother, goddess, medicine woman, and more, as well as exploration into what psychedelics can teach us about ourselves and our relationship to femininity (regardless of our gender identity, or assigned gender at birth). The historical context explains in short order how age-old expressions of patriarchal control of women intertwined with the attitudes of colonizers hell-bent on portraying indigenous peoples as savages, and how these factors (and others) also led to the vilification and feminization of psychedelics in the modern era in Western civilization.

Ritual work such as breath work, dancing, drumming, and meditation, along with newer types of therapies, are discussed in brief; these weave together the psychospiritual space of the shaman and the psychonaut, both today and historically, and assist in opening the gateways for energetic transformation, psychological breakthrough, healing, and vision. There is also some discussion of the threat presented by the psychedelic community to the very notion of gender: the psychonaut who peers behind the curtain of performative gender may find its value has depreciated upon return from the trip.

The problem of Western appropriation of indigenous cultures is of special note in the history of psychedelics, and several authors take time to explore these painful themes while exploring where we can go from here. Sadly, the Western tendency towards commodification and consumption, especially without a holistic template for healthy and balanced usage, also causes these drugs to be misused as a result of their lack of appropriate cultural context. As an example, most American citizens don’t have a cultural or social place where these types of pharmaka are accepted — let alone legal — so even though many Americans and American society as a whole would likely benefit from consciousness-expanding medicine and the spiritual messages that these pharmaka can bring, this will continue to be beyond our reach until we recognize and appreciate mystery, chaos, intuition, and femininity.

A few authors, discussing human rights, legal precedence, and the successes of other movements for radical social transformation, explore possible routes to affecting global legal and social change in tandem, while others talk about the growing cultural movement of psychedelic feminists and ecologists, and how these forces are coming together to affect new change and healing.

It’s difficult to summarize the main narrative themes of this book in a short article because throughout the twenty-three essays, there are hundreds of themes to choose from. There is the botanical and the herbal; the folkloric and the mythic; the emotional and the mental; the magic and the mystic; the political and the social; the historical and the traditional; the progressive and the contemporary. There is something for everyone and anyone who is interested in psychedelics here, and if there’s one thing this book makes clear, it’s that interested parties should pick a path and start walking, because there is a lot of work to be done on the path to a world which accepts and understands psychedelic experience as a healthy and illuminating.

Psychedelic Mysteries of the Feminine: Creativity, Ecstasy, and Healing on Amazon

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About the Author:

Sarah McMenomy is an artist and witch. Her craft incorporates herbalism, spellwork, trance, divination, auras, and more. Her work can be found at https://sarahmcmenomy.tumblr.com

Book Review – Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish by Lucy Cavendish

July, 2019

Book review
Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish
by Lucy Cavendish
Pages: 208

“There is an immense natural power in the Universe … You have this natural power within you, and it is your birthright to learn how to work with it,” Lucy Cavendish writes in her book, Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish.

Working spells connects you to that power that flows through everything, and Cavendish offers enough information to harness that power. She gleaned the contents of this book from her personal journals, offering a grimoire – her collection of rules and laws that apply to magic and the craft, rituals, spells, potions, meditations and magickal notes.

This book provides a solid introduction to understanding nature’s powers and using them wisely. Beginning with laws and a history of spells, Cavendish presents a spell to connect to your magickal bloodline.

Chapter 3 continues with information to time the crafting and casting spells by the moon and the circle of the year. Building altars, magickal tools, casting a circle, calling the quarters and the art of magickal dressing are all covered. Working with deities is Chapter 8 while Chapter 9 covers creating sacred space for spellcasting.

Spells are treated matter-of-factually – without mystery – as an empowering path to greater abundance and joy.

Disagreeing with those who claim intent is everything, Cavendish writes, “Intent is vital. But it is not everything. … Without your commitment to gathering your ingredients, learning and studying, and casting, you only have the strong desire to do something. When your desire teams up with your commitment and your action, then you begin to create magick.”

Seven days worth of daily meditations, magic and spells offers readers the opportunity to create a magickal life in a powerful week that has the potential to be life changing.

Spells for love, protection, success and abundance complete the book. A few I found interesting include a spell for letting go of grief and one for empaths to protect themselves. A glossary and a list of magickal ingredients round out the book.

I think anyone ready to take spell crafting seriously will find this a helpful guide.

About Author Lucy Cavendish

Lucy Cavendish is an eclectic solitary witch – drawing from a variety of belief systems and magickal traditions – who sometimes works with others. She created Witchcraft magazine, has published several books and has been a feature writer for Australian magazines.

“I work with the word ‘witch’ because its root meaning is to ‘change or bend’ and ‘wisdom’. Thus I see witchcraft as being a path of change and manifestation, from natural sources, and in harmony with natural cycles, and with awareness of the Laws of the Universe – which, to me, are wisdom incarnate,” she wrote.

For more information, visit lucycavendish.com.au.

Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish on Amazon

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About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

Book Review – 10-Minute Crystal Ball: Easy Tips for Developing Your Inner Wisdom and Psychic Powers by Skye Alexander

July, 2019

Book Review
10-Minute Crystal Ball
Easy Tips for Developing Your Inner Wisdom and Psychic Powers
by Skye Alexander

In one of the previous issues I had the opportunity to review Skye Alexander’s book, Magickal Astrology: Use the Power of the Planets to Create an Enchanted Life and thoroughly enjoyed the simplicity, yet complexity provided in a compact book. This month I am reviewing another of Skye’s books entitled, 10-Minute Crystal Ball: Easy Tips for Developing Your Inner Wisdom and Psychic Powers. Skye is a practitioner of magick and knows the value of honing your intuitive self as a support to the work of the magick and the mundane.

….”(actually) you do have a “sixth sense”. Everybody does. Most of us just don’t use it.
This untapped resource-your psychic power- is a natural readily available ability
that can increase your appreciation of the world around you,
enrich your interactions with other people and
help you create the life you want.”….1.

Ms. Alexander makes this statement as part of the Introduction and it is one that is filled with empowerment and the opportunity for greater self-awareness. I appreciated the way in which she reminded us that we have many gifts that have largely been ignored or put aside and that one of the greatest intentions for honing your psychic senses is anchored in the practicality of the mundane experience as corporeal beings and less about being the “all powerful Oz”.

Recognizing that we live busy lives and the demands of modern life leave little, if any time, for practice of psychic abilities, Ms. Alexander offers a compendium of exercises and experiences that fill the space of a 10-minute coffee break. This makes the material contained all the more accessible and, more importantly doable in breaking the work into bite-size pieces that can slowly be folded into the 24/7-365 that we, practitioners speak of.

As a side note, the visual component of this hardback book was very appealing, and the compact size nestled easily into my hand and fit discreetly in a tote bag. It is illustrated and section separated by pages inscribed in Gold and Black inks on glossy paper and the feel is one of a tactile-visual experience that is rich and luxurious in offering.

10-Minute Crystal Ball is organized into Two Parts introducing seven (7) chapters. Now before we go any further let me clarify that this book is not (only) about Crystal Ball gazing. I suspect that this was a title used as both a nod to the traditional fortune teller using the crystal ball, the depth of insight and visioning one thinks of when crystal gazing; and I found it to be an excellent gateway, so to speak for exploring many of the modalities used in developing the psychic gifts.

Part One dives right into the specific of mental processes, psychic opening, meditation, telepathy, dreams and realms to be entered as the consciousness shifts into a larger expression of interaction with the subtle energies that surround as a means of inquiry and inspiration.

Chapter 3: The Psychic’s Toolbox presents a sampling and basic “how to” of the Tarot, Runes, I Ching, Pendulums, Crystal Balls and more. This approach provides the reader with opportunities to “play” and “try out” the various tools of oracular work before settling into one that resonates and piques the interest for deeper study.

The Intuitive arts and divination are broken down to include Astrology, Numerology, Hand Analysis and Graphology. These arts fuse scientific principles with the organic energetic information and require less of an overt visual cue, as in the case of Tarot cards, and more of analysis and processing of information gathered.

Part Two, which comprises more than 2/3rds of the book allows the reader to begin the work of practice and experience. Chapter 4: Intuition, takes us back to some of the staple exercises that many will easily recognize. Sensing objects concealed in hidden boxes, guessing who is on the phone before you answer to name a few. The exercises, and there are tons, are meant to use and stimulate the physical senses as the more etheric and psychic of these opens to another layer of processing beyond simply seeing, hearing, feeling, etc. And, as promised each can be done in a space of limited time and some can even be done discreetly in more public settings. Remember that 10-minute coffee break, I mentioned? How about…

… Look at a cloud formation. As they drift through the sky, clouds constantly
change shape….. gaze up at the sky. Relax your mind and watch the
cloud formations-what images do you see in them?
What impressions do they inspire in you?…2.

Chapter 5: divination is devoted to the art of prediction. These exercises are designed to create a pattern of paying attention and allowing the information to flow in a recognizable way as you tap into the realms of probability and synchronicity. Tools such as runes, pendulums and Tarot cards are folded into some of the exercises, ad others require nothing but your full attention and conscious intention to see beyond the veils of illusion. “Gazing” or being able to attune your visual imagery to be receptive, exercises make use of a flame, a blank TV (no Poltergeist jokes here), a crystal ball and staring at the Moon.

Chapter 6: Other People prompts engagement and observation of those around you. This is also a way for us to remember that we are part of something more than ourselves and that although there may be the solitary work of the psychic practitioner, we are continually impacted by all of the variables that are part of our environment and physical (as well as etheric) space. These exercises are designed for developing Mental Telepathy and learning to Read Other People. The very first of these being a routine occurrence that we engage in and rarely would include as part of our psychic development practice. “Pay attention to your first impression of a person” takes us to the headspace of sensing more than the obvious when meeting someone….

… Your first impressions tell you a lot about someone-this response
is how your intuition communicates information to you…3.

The final Chapter 7: Problem Solving is meant to pull all of the pieces together and actually make use of what you have experienced and learned along the way. Developing these gifts is of no value if they are not put to use and one of the most obvious uses is to seek the answers needed, sense the information received and than apply its wisdom towards making something better. The starting point for this shift in perception is to….

…Ask for Help: Unless you ask for help, you may not receive it. Think of
your inner wisdom as a good friend who is always
willing to lend a hand if you request it…4.

10-Minute Crystal Ball: Easy Tips for Developing Your Inner Wisdom and Psychic Powers is a wonderful addition to the plethora of books on psychic development. Ms. Alexander has once again provided the inquisitive reader with the tools to begin their own course of study and exploration in a compact, concise and interesting book…….. I bet you knew I was going to say that!

Visit the author’s web page:

https://www.skyealexander.com

Footnotes:

1. Introduction
2. p. 72
3. p. 129
4. p. 167

10-Minute Crystal Ball: Easy Tips for Developing Your Inner Wisdom and Psychic Powers on Amazon

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About the Author:

Robin Fennelly is a Wiccan High Priestess, teacher, poet and author.

She is the author of (click on book titles for more information):

The Inner Chamber Volume One on Amazon

It’s Written in the Stars

Astrology

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Two

poetry of the Spheres (Volume 2) on Amazon

Qabalah

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Three

Awakening the Paths on Amazon

Qabalah

A Year With Gaia on Amazon

The Eternal Cord

Temple of the Sun and Moon on Amazon

Luminous Devotions

The Magickal Pen Volume One (Volume 1) on Amazon

A Collection of Esoteric Writings

The Elemental Year on Amazon

Aligning the Parts of SELF

The Enchanted Gate on Amazon

Musings on the Magick of the Natural World

Sleeping with the Goddess on Amazon

Nights of Devotion

A Weekly Reflection on Amazon

Musings for the Year

Her books are available on Amazon or on this website and her Blogs can be found atRobin Fennelly 

Follow Robin on Instagram & Facebook.

Book Review – The Darkening Age: The Christian Deconstruction of the Classical World by Catherine Nixey

July, 2019

Book Review
The Darkening Age
The Christian Deconstruction of the Classical World
by Catherine Nixey

I can’t remember where I once read that we humans are creatures who are amnesiacs. But we are, lucky for us; someone will come along and write a book that helps us remember what we should have never forgotten. The Darkening Age is such a book written by Catherine Nixey.

When I was growing up, I was told the myth that Christians in the early part of their Spirituality were prosecuted for their beliefs. That the religion slowly won over the world with love and peace. I was raised being fed a Christian myth that was a bald-faced lie.

Ms. Nixey has written a book that opens the vault of time and looks back to a time that has been written over (literally) and buried beneath the dirt of both time and graves. The Darkening Age is not an attack on any belief system, but it will make you wonder what else has been covered up or deleted from the past of the world.

I have always known that the winners wrote history. I can honestly say that I had never really thought about the world before Christianity. (I have my beliefs that I hold to be true, but I never thought about the destruction of the Pagan world.) And yes, upon reading this book, I have had my eyes opened to the atrocities that the so-called early Christians visited upon those, that in the words of Emperor Justinian and his Code 1.11.10.2 called, labored under the insanity of paganism.

When I read Chapter 9 The Reckless Ones, I was reminded of the movie “Agora” starring Rachel Weisz. In the film Agora, Ms. Weisz plays Hypatia. The Reckless Ones tells the story of the group of people and their leader that killed Hypatia. (Agora tells the story of Hypatia’s from her teaching days to her death. With both, there is a complete tale.)

Most people believe that Christian persecution began with Nero. But there was no government-led persecution for the first 250 of Christianity. The greatest heroes in the early church were those that died most horribly. And if you could get yourself killed, all your previous sins would be washed away.

The early Christian belief was that they were saving Pagans from an afterlife in Hell. And that if they had to be killed to do that, it was fine. In the fifth century there lived an Egyptian monk who is now St. Shenoute, who declared, “There is no crime for those who have Christ.” And he killed those who he saw as idol worshipers and pagans under that belief.

Many manuscripts written by world-renowned philosophers were scrubbed using pumice stones, and the parchments then had the Bible written on them. So, we lost all the wisdom of the ancient world in the coming to power of the Christian belief.

Ms. Nixey closes the book with Damascius chosing the Academy in Athens. The Academy was at the time a world renowned school of philosophy. When Damascius and his teacher Isidore first arrived in Athens the Academy was “on the brink of extreme old age” as observed by Isidore. At the age of seventy, Damascius was now fleeing again, as an exiled philosopher and at the age of seventy.

One of the saddest sentences in this book is “The idea that philosophers might have fought fiercely, with all they had, against Christianity was-is-passed over.”

I recommend this book for anyone who studies history, religious history and wants to know more about the Pagan World that is part of our collective history.

The Darkening Age: The Christian Destruction of the Classical World on Amazon

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About the Author:

Dawn Borries loves reading and was thrilled to become a Reviewer for PaganPages.Org. Dawn, also, has been doing Tarot and Numerology readings for the past 25 years. Dawn does readings on her Facebook page. If you are interested in a reading you can reach her on Facebook @eagleandunicorn.

Book Review – The Little Book of Dream Symbols by Jacqueline Towers

July, 2019

Book Review
The Little Book of Dream Symbols
The Essential Guide to Over 700 of the Most Common Dreams
by Jacqueline Towers

Brightest Blessings

This book contains a wealth of knowledge in its easy to use format. It makes you want to take your time referencing and reading up on what your dreams mean the next morning. Each entry is well thought out. Ms. Towers gives a bit of intro into dreams, a little bit on nightmares, also.

I especially loved her advice here where she says:

” As you begin interpreting your dreams, consider images that the dreams are giving you, if a certain image means something to you, check the interpretation in this book, but also go with your own feeling about the image” -Jacqueline Towers

I feel the most interesting information came from her entry about colors and how each has it’s own meaning.

Mixed: you will have increased security and success.

Blue: you will be free of worry, and you can expect help from others. Red: you should control your temper.

Green: Expect news from afar or plan for a journey.

Gray: you will experience a stagnant period.

Mauve: you will have some small disappointments.

Orange: Delays will occur
Pink: surprising success is coming your way.

Yellow: Achievement will be gained only after a series of setbacks and struggle.

White: the color of promise succession all areas of your life.

Black: this color is unhappy omen, unless connected with funeral, in which case it predicts that you will have difficulties to overcome.

You can learn a lot and gain new insight on many topics of dreaming from this book. Some of the entries are short, but they give you a lot to ponder on dream interpretation. This book is a good tool for understanding dreams and small enough to tuck into your purse or pocket to enjoy somewhere in the sun. This is a good book to start with.

My thoughts:

Like with any thing when learning about dreams, write down about the dream, emotions, colors, images, even numbers, esp anything that repeats. You can find a lot of help in Ms Towers book, but don’t be afraid to look beyond as well.

The Little Book of Dream Symbols: The Essential Guide to Over 700 of the Most Common Dreams on Amazon

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About the Author:

Norma Clark I’m Wiccan, My style follows my spiritual path and what comes to mind.. I live in a small rural town, Paris, Idaho. I share my life With my Wiccan husband, 2 hyper Children & gang of critters. I love to create new designs by looking at nature & cultural ideas for my Jewelry and create unique Metaphysical items. Shop, sit a spell or two & Come see the Magick of Forevrgoddessboutique Link to my shop: forevrgoddessboutique

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