craft

Book Review – Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish by Lucy Cavendish

July, 2019

Book review
Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish
by Lucy Cavendish
Pages: 208

“There is an immense natural power in the Universe … You have this natural power within you, and it is your birthright to learn how to work with it,” Lucy Cavendish writes in her book, Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish.

Working spells connects you to that power that flows through everything, and Cavendish offers enough information to harness that power. She gleaned the contents of this book from her personal journals, offering a grimoire – her collection of rules and laws that apply to magic and the craft, rituals, spells, potions, meditations and magickal notes.

This book provides a solid introduction to understanding nature’s powers and using them wisely. Beginning with laws and a history of spells, Cavendish presents a spell to connect to your magickal bloodline.

Chapter 3 continues with information to time the crafting and casting spells by the moon and the circle of the year. Building altars, magickal tools, casting a circle, calling the quarters and the art of magickal dressing are all covered. Working with deities is Chapter 8 while Chapter 9 covers creating sacred space for spellcasting.

Spells are treated matter-of-factually – without mystery – as an empowering path to greater abundance and joy.

Disagreeing with those who claim intent is everything, Cavendish writes, “Intent is vital. But it is not everything. … Without your commitment to gathering your ingredients, learning and studying, and casting, you only have the strong desire to do something. When your desire teams up with your commitment and your action, then you begin to create magick.”

Seven days worth of daily meditations, magic and spells offers readers the opportunity to create a magickal life in a powerful week that has the potential to be life changing.

Spells for love, protection, success and abundance complete the book. A few I found interesting include a spell for letting go of grief and one for empaths to protect themselves. A glossary and a list of magickal ingredients round out the book.

I think anyone ready to take spell crafting seriously will find this a helpful guide.

About Author Lucy Cavendish

Lucy Cavendish is an eclectic solitary witch – drawing from a variety of belief systems and magickal traditions – who sometimes works with others. She created Witchcraft magazine, has published several books and has been a feature writer for Australian magazines.

“I work with the word ‘witch’ because its root meaning is to ‘change or bend’ and ‘wisdom’. Thus I see witchcraft as being a path of change and manifestation, from natural sources, and in harmony with natural cycles, and with awareness of the Laws of the Universe – which, to me, are wisdom incarnate,” she wrote.

For more information, visit lucycavendish.com.au.

Spellbound: The Secret Grimoire of Lucy Cavendish on Amazon

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

Wreathing the Wheel

March, 2019

March

I’ve been working with astrology a lot in my craft lately, and it’s starting to work its way into all my designs! Here, I’ve added the planets associated with each day of the week in a flow of stardust — this is pretty, but it’s also a way of labeling the days and reminding me of the planetary associations.

This March, the full moon is on Ostara, the Vernal Equinox. It brings with it a great potential for manifestation of personal works. To harness this power and celebrate the season, I’m making a renewed effort to spend time on my garden. My husband and I moved a little over a year ago from a large house that had a lot of garden space to a townhouse with fairly little garden space, and I haven’t done much with it yet. I brought several potted houseplants and a few garden herbs, a few of which are in the ground already — carnation, spearmint, rosemary, and valerian — but there’s room for plenty more

At right, I’ve made a detailed listing of the plants I’m growing or planning to grow, with notes about what type of soil they need, how much sun they should get, how often they should be watered, how large they are likely to get, and any other care information that seems relevant. There are a few spots to add plants, but since I don’t have much space, I’ll probably do so slowly

At left, I have a log to track my progress and schedule important dates, and a small map of my garden in the middle of the spread. Because I have such little space, I have to have the plants spread out into several different locations, and it’s important that I don’t confuse them. Some of the plants I’m growing need to be treated carefully and grown inside a terrarium due to their toxicity; some will do better outside than in. In this case, organization is extremely important!

The final step in this process is to carry the theme forward through the rest of my journal so that I can return to this intention on an appropriate schedule and don’t forget what I’m doing or get lost in my plans. With most of these plants, weekly observation should be sufficient for me to determine their needs, but there is still quite a bit of work to be done to get everything set up, and I’ll need to be very careful when I’m starting my seeds. I can’t wait to see what grows!

***

About the Author:

Sarah McMenomy is an artist and witch. Her craft incorporates herbalism, spellwork, trance, divination, auras, and more. Her work can be found at https://sarahmcmenomy.tumblr.com

Book of Shadows: As the Wheel Turns

February, 2019

Imbolc Planned and Explored

February is the month of Brigid, the hearth fires are tended, the seeds are readied for planting, and spell work done in February focuses on purification, growth, and healing. Loving the self is the theme throughout the month of February; after all, how you love your self will teach everyone in your sphere of influence how to love you. This is a time for kindness to be extended inward. In addition, the energies in February are peek for accepting responsibility for past mistakes and forgiving yourself while you make plans for the future.

This month, I focus on spell crafting and making sigils. A sigil is a combination of symbols that are placed together with intent and are fashioned to become the embodiment of your intention. For instance, I may use the Theban Alphabet (aka the Witch’s Runes) to fashion a Sigil for a spell. If you’re not acquainted with the Theban Alphabet, a quick Google® search will lead you to the alphabet easily enough. Here is an example of a Sigil, the word is “Love” and I used the Theban Alphabet and then placed the letters together to represent how the “love” could represent itself in my spell crafting. Sigils have many uses in magical workings and it is my belief that when I make a sigil, all of my intent and purpose in the spell is crafted into the sigil and it facilitates my workings by manifesting a physical thing that I can see and use as a reminder or a representation of the working. The entire process of me devising my own sigil puts my intention into the sigil and the meaning is carried through the work. Some people use Runes, Theban Alphabet, Zodiac Signs, Sacred Symbols, and a myriad of other representations of their intention. Even a “doodle” can be a sigil; I have used “doodles” in sigil work as well. The beauty of the craft is that it is your own and you must walk the path, therefore, I am neither right nor wrong, I simply am being the best person I know how to be, and I use the craft to facilitate that idea until it becomes my practice.

The month of February is also the month when I plant my seed for the coming harvests which are Lammas (aka Lughnasadh), Mabon, and Samhain. I rarely plant more than one seed per harvest because I do not like to set myself up for failure by taking on too much when I am working on my own personal evolution. Every year, my seed work manifests during the dark times, between Samhain and Yule and, ordinarily, by Yule I would have begun the ascent from the dark days of self-contemplation with a seed virtually budding and ready for planting. This year was a bit different for me. I have reduced my seed work to a short mantra that has volition and purpose and the intention of the seed work is to write it down on a piece of paper, plant it in a pot with a bulb of some sort – usually Amaryllis because they remind me of my mother – and I nurture that seed daily. Nurturing your seed includes lighting a candle every day, watering, and speaking the mantra out loud every day in front of the seed. This not only reinforces your working, but it sets the tone for the rest of your year. Seed work is always internal work, always something for my highest and best good, and sometimes it is painful. The pain is sometimes like that of my youth, when my long bones ached, and my mother would tell me that someday I would be big and strong and able to do things that I cannot do as a child. I remind myself of that in the midst of any pain that seed work can deliver. I plant the seed on Imbolc (aka Candlemas), February 2, and I tend it daily.

The Goddess Brigid is a focal Deity for me during the month of February, She tends the hearth fires, and Her aspects encompass healing, poetry, and smith crafting. I usually start to play with making chain mail pieces during the month of February, an homage to Brigid’s forge, this year is a pentacle keychain made from chain mail. Of course, February also celebrates the Chinese New Year, with 2019 being “The Year of the Pig” and there may be messages meant for us to receive from Pig this month. They are extremely intelligent animals and have quirky qualities about them, it’s worth a look into them if you’re one of the people who looks for messages from the animal world

February also celebrates Valentine’s Day, and Brigid shares aspects of healing, childbirth, and unity with this celebration. Perhaps you have experienced a broken heart, Brigid can help to soothe that pain and ease the immediate shock of loss, while other aspects of this Goddess also serve to help is with new relationships and the flames of love that most tend to fan during this celebration. For pregnant Pagans, Brigid is often sought to lend Her energies to mother’s during birth. There is no union more sacred than that of a mother and newborn child

As the light begins to return, the darkness begins to wane and we have planted our seeds and February marks the time of year when tending to seed work is important not only in terms of personal growth, but also in how deeply we plant our seed so that the roots take hold and we experience positive, permanent change for the greater good; not only for ourselves, but for the world in which we interact. On the 19th of February we experience a Full Moon in Virgo and with this super full moon comes energies that are prime for completing tasks, putting order into your world, settling chaos, and maybe even trying to grasp a deeper understanding that we live in an imperfect world and must strive for balance during this time.

As Brigid’s month comes to a close, we must be mindful of tending the seeds that we have planted so that our harvest is well tended, our fields well-watered, and that we take the time, on a daily basis, to check in with our spiritual wellness, physical presence, and emotional stability. February is not just a month of exchanging cards and chocolates with our lovers. February is a month of self-awareness and love of the self. Be kind to yourself. Treat yourself well. Remember, how you love and treat yourself teaches those around you how to love and treat you. So be kind to yourself.

As a Pagan and a Witch who works in a professional setting, I carry my working Book of Shadows with me to work and everywhere else that I go. I am often referring to it throughout the busy work day or it may even be open on my desk for quick reference. Sometimes, people carry with them a certain vibe or they become negative or speak in a negative manner. When this happens in front of me, I like to dispel the negative energy as quickly as I am able. Because I am out and about and not in my home, I cannot smudge in my office, I cannot use my bell to dispense the negativity, nor would it be professional to cleanse the area with dance and fire. However, I have found an answer to all of the negativity that could potentially linger and that is by placing themed shaker cards in my working Book of Shadows. They are beautiful, easy to keep accessible, and they work like a dream! All I do is remove the shaker card from my working Book of Shadows, take a long look at the beauty in my hands, center myself, and give that shaker card a few shakes and before the last bit of glitter settles…calm and peace is restored. My shaker cards are commissioned by my friend, Suzy Meza, and she makes these fantastic cards to order. As I will do with each and every month, the resources, shop and group links can be found at the end of the article.

RESOURCES:

MAMBI® CHP Extension Packs:

https://www.meandmybigideas.com

CHP Custom Cover & Foiled Pentacle Stickers by Claire McNamee:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/BubsLovesBubba

Custom Shaker Cards by Suzy Meza:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/gichiscraftcorner

February Monthly and Weekly Stickers by Shirley Lenhard are free at the Pagan Plannertarium:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/217392179039705/

February Cover Page – Shoot for the Stars – Recollections® “Constellations” paper pad & Miscellaneous Washi tapes:

Available at Michael’s and other craft retailers

***

About the Author:

Shirley Lenhard has been a practicing Witch and a Pagan since 1983 and lives in New England with her husband. She is employed full time in the legal field and has her Masters Degree in Psychology from the University of South Florida. Shirley looks forward to living her best possible life by giving back to the Pagan Community and has created the Facebook group “Pagan Plannertarium” where she provides a safe home for fellow pagans to have discussions about their path and to get free planner stickers and layouts. Shirley is a past writer for Llewellyn Publishing and The Peace Paper.

Book Review – The Transformative Witchcraft: The Greater Mysteries by Jason Mankey

November, 2018

Book Review

The Transformative Witchcraft: The Greater Mysteries

by Jason Mankey

Repetition is a good thing, especially when the author infuses it with their own ideas and experiences. I believe that everything that we can do to make this information relatable to the broadest of audiences is a positive step towards bring greater awareness to the practice of Witchcraft and the work and dedication that is required to follow such a path. Such is the case in this new offering by author and editor of blog spot, Patheos Pagan, Jason Mankey- The Transformative Power of Witchcraft. Jason has authored several books on the craft, this one feeling more of a synthesis of the basics from start to finish.

The book is complete with history, ritual, creating sacred space, the work of self and more. There are three chapters devoted to the history of the craft and given that we are a spirituality based on the history, but crafted into a neopagan approach, having the solid foundation of what was, goes a long way into crafting what can be.

Chapters Four through Six focus on the “Cone of Power”, its creation, uses and theory behind its success. This information is presented in a thoughtful manner, offering options and adaptations, which I believe many newcomers to the path, are hesitant to interject on their own. Knowing how, when and where to direct energy is even more important now in the wake of global and domestic events and the working of witchcraft is a tool of change that, if wisely used can achieve amazing results.

I particularly enjoyed reading Chapters Seven through Ten, under Part Three’s Header of “Dedications, Initiations and Elevations”. For many, this topic alone is veiled in mystery and there are as many interpretations of what those semantics mean as paths of practice. Indeed, no one size fits all and as the author discusses, much depends on solitary, Tradition based, hereditary or other as to what these terms mean to the individual. Additionally, rituals are provided to be used as starting points or intact for the reader. I appreciate the detail that went into this section, particularly in preparing the seeker for the work required to be done, the preparation of self and the commitment that is undertaken when receiving any of these deeper connections to your path.

No book on witchcraft would be complete without attention to lunar working and Drawing Down the Moon as ritual and self-generator. Jason also covers the other types of Divine assumption, interaction and possession that may be encountered or experienced in the greater work. Chapter Thirteen provides all of the basics and information for the Ritual of Drawing Down the Moon.

The book concludes with discussion of The Great Rite and its ethical use in truth and physicality as well as metaphorical and representative approach. Each has its own specific reasons for selection, and in particular, when enacting The Great Rite as an offering of sex magick and potency, I believe it is important to know exactly why and where that option would be suitable and when it is used unethically as a means of control over the uninformed.

A glossary and bibliography is provided and the index makes it easy to zero in on specific topics.

This book is available for pre-order on Amazon with a publishing date of January 2019.

Transformative Witchcraft: The Greater Mysteries on Amazon

***

About the Author:

Robin Fennelly is a Wiccan High Priestess, teacher, poet and author.

She is the author of (click on book titles for more information):

 

The Inner Chamber Volume One on Amazon

It’s Written in the Stars

Astrology

 

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Two

poetry of the Spheres (Volume 2) on Amazon

Qabalah

 

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Three

Awakening the Paths on Amazon

Qabalah

 

A Year With Gaia on Amazon

The Eternal Cord

 

Temple of the Sun and Moon on Amazon

Luminous Devotions

 

The Magickal Pen Volume One (Volume 1) on Amazon

A Collection of Esoteric Writings

 

The Elemental Year on Amazon

Aligning the Parts of SELF

 

The Enchanted Gate on Amazon

Musings on the Magick of the Natural World

 

Sleeping with the Goddess on Amazon

Nights of Devotion

 

A Weekly Reflection on Amazon

Musings for the Year

 

Her books are available on Amazon or on this website and her Blogs can be found atRobin Fennelly 

 

Follow Robin on Instagram & Facebook.

Book Review – Dark Goddess Craft: A Journey Through the Heart of Transformation by Stephanie Woodfield

August, 2018

Dark Goddess Craft:

A Journey Through the Heart of Transformation

Author: Stephanie Woodfield

Publisher: Llewellyn Publications

Copyright:2017

I decided to do more than just a review of this book. I wanted to work through it. I read the whole book, but I picked which Dark Goddess to work with as I read each section. Ms. Woodfield explains upfront the nature of the Dark Gods or Goddesses as she has come to understand it. I feel that she is right, about how only in the modern times have we picked the labels of Light (Good) and Dark (Evil/Bad). Our ancestors didn’t classify things in such a manner, because to them the Underworld wasn’t seen as Evil or Bad. It was the same as what we see today in the world, but it did have its differences.

Ms. Woodfield breaks it down into three different parts, The Descent, the Challenge, and Rebirth. The first two parts have 4 Goddesses with which to work. The Rebirth is the only part that has 3 Goddesses only. There is a mix of Goddess with which to work. Ms. Woodfield has Devotional Work and Rituals for Greek, Hindu, Inuit, and Yoruba Orisha. There are others as well, and this is just a sample of what she gives.

There is the Descent first. Here you have four different Goddess, and you get to pick which one you want to connect to in your working. I picked Hekate, and she is already a Goddess I relate to daily. In doing the Devotional operations that Ms. Woodfield put in the book and working the Ritual, I deepened my connection with Hekate. Through this working, I also learned some more about myself, and how I see the world around me.

Next comes the Challenge. Here is where I felt the real work came in for myself. You may find that the Descent is where you face your main challenge and this part is more comfortable for you. Here I worked with Eris. For me, this happened when there was a family crisis and working with the Goddess Eris was calming for me. I can see why the old saying of “What a Deity causes, they can also take away.” I thank Eris for helping me through this time of chaos.

Rebirth has 3 Goddesses from which you can choose. They are Blodeuwedd, Scáthach, and Persephone. I had a bit of a challenge here seeing Persephone as a Dark Goddess because I have always thought of her in the role of the Maiden, but she is also Queen of the Underworld. And working with her in this way was liberating to me. I felt that I had a rebirth in two ways.

I found this book to be insightful in that it helped to change and challenge my views on Dark Goddess Craft. Ms. Woodfield has written a book that I think will help others find their way forward with Devotional workings and Rituals. I am looking forward to reading more of Ms. Woodfield’s writings.

Dark Goddess Craft: A Journey through the Heart of Transformation

***

About the Author:

Dawn Borries loves reading and was thrilled to become an E-Book reviewer for PaganPages.Org. Dawn, also, has been doing Tarot and Numerology readings for the past 25 years. Dawn does readings on her Facebook page.  If you are interested in a reading you can reach her at: https://www.facebook.com/Readings-by-Dawn-1608860142735781/

The Bad Witch Reviews: The Magick of Master Lilly by Tobsha Learner

July, 2018

The Bad Witch Reviews:

The Magick of Master Lilly

by Tobsha Learner

 

This book feels timely. Set before and during the English civil war from the point of view of an astrologer and magician it might seem odd for me to say that but it is. There are, of course, more than two factions but you have really two opposing forces. One cultured, connected to Europe, artist, intellectually explorative and another towards nationalism, religious hatred, anti-intellectualism and paranoia.


No this book feels very relevant today. It also happens to be a cracking read. The story is well paced, the characters alive and vibrant. The “sides” are full of well-meaning people communicating badly and not getting what they want. The villains are ordinary people given the liberty to act in monstrous ways by the conflict around them.


The occult elements are interesting and a good blend of fanciful and real. The terminology doesn’t distract or bog down those whom might have no knowledge of Craft, astrology or
Cunning Folk ways. Yet it doesn’t become historical techno-babble.
The victims to the folly of war are many, and always the innocent are punished first. The farmers looted, the
Cunning Folks tortured and killed, the “traitors” real or imagined hung without rule of law, the women and children raped and left half mad: this was English violence unleashed.


The one we pretend isn’t there. The one we hide behind sports and stiff upper lips and so on. The one that simmers and you sometimes see in football hooliganism, drunken fights, blood sports and riots.


I feel like a learned a lot reading this book (the research is excellent) about how history repeats itself. Yet it wasn’t a sour book it is full of hope, love and good intentions. I devoured it wholly, reading it near constantly from the moment I got it until I was done. I can see this would be a great holiday read, especially if you were
traveling in the UK.


I can imagine this would be a great read if you had the opportunity to read it in London. There is a great affection for London in this book and visiting landmarks from the book from pubs to palaces would be both entertaining and interesting. Maybe you could watch Mother Thames and dream how different our lives would all be if the stars had aligned differently and great and terrible men had listened to angels instead of stubborn hate.

 

The Magick of Master Lilly

SpellCrafting: Spells & Rituals

June, 2018

Dragonfly Medicine Magick

 

 

Merry meet.

You can use the dragonfly you made as a craft as part of a ritual or spell by calling on dragonfly medicine.

According to BirdClan.org, “It is a power animal which can help to put us in touch with nature spirits.

Dragonfly medicine is about the breaking of illusions, especially those illusions that prevent growth and maturity. Dragonfly is the bringer of visions of power.”

Dragonfly medicine can both foretell a time of change and help during the transition. So, if you’re uncomfortable, overwhelmed and struggling, seek assistance from dragonfly. They can help us see beyond the limits we place on our reality and remind us we can have a world where magic exists.

In her blog on shamansmarket.com, Aleeiah Sura states, “Sometimes seeing a Dragonfly may foretell a time of great change and transition. The first thing that usually happens when a big change is due, is that we put up lot of emotional energy into resisting what’s coming, even though on a mental level we may understand that change is very much needed. Dragonfly is an especially helpful guide and ally for those who are resisting change that is overdue, and can teach us to go through change without kicking and screaming.”

Part of the reason, I believe, is because dragonflies span two realms. They begun as aquatic larva known as nymphs. and can spend up to five years in fresh water. Water speaks of emotions, the subconscious mind and dreams. The larva then undergo an almost magical series of changes; they move through stages, grow their wings and take flight as an adult. Adults may live from several days to a few weeks. They can fly up, down, left, right, backwards and forwards, making them very adaptable. If they lose one of their two sets of wings, the can still fly. They are often found by water and are capable of crossing oceans. As a creature of the air, they are linked to thoughts and communication.

Because of their short lifespan, dragonflies also help us to value time and not waste it on what does not serve our highest good and greatest joy.

 

 

If you choose to call upon the spirit of Dragonfly to assist your journey, be ready for a shift in perspective. Dragonfly often shows us that things are not as they seem. Look behind the veil of mind created illusion, and be willing to shed some old beliefs. Call upon the Dragonfly for help with transition and when you need the power of adaptation, strength, and resilience to go through big life changes,” Sura writes.

A song she wrote in 2017 entitled “Dragonfly Medicine” may be useful in your work. She explains the song “holds vibrational medicine for those who may be resisting change. … It also contains the energy for healing ancestral wounds.”

While composing this song, Sura said she became a student of Dragonfly medicine.

The Dragonfly had quite a few things to teach me about letting go, transitions, and not resisting life’s flow.”

The lyrics follow & the track can be bought for $1 at the following link:


https://aleeiahsura.bandcamp.com/track/dragonfly-medicine

 

Dragonfly Medicine
by Aleeiah Sura

 

Dragonfly, Dragonfly call my name.

It’s been far too long since I changed my way.

 

I need your spirit now to guide this change.

Shine some light now into this pain,

Shine your light now into this pain.

 

And let these winds blow through your heart.

And let these winds blow through your heart.

 

Let these winds blow through my heart,

I let these winds blow through my heart,

 

Shine some light now into this pain,

And let it heal these wounds of ancient days.

Let it heal these wounds of ancient days.”

 

 

Merry part. And merry meet again.

 

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

June, 2018

Dragonfly

Merry meet.

 

 

With the magic of midsummer comes the magic of dragonflies. Their gossamer wings, narrow body and big eyes make them seem like they come from the Land of Fae I imagined in my youth as being all wee and cute.

I have many memories of lazing on the lake on an inner tube or raft and having one or more landing on me, as if finding an island on their long journey over the water. Some would stay for many minutes. Seeing them reminds me of those warm, long days.

To hold on to that essence of summer and the solstice – as the cold and the dark begin to slowly but steadily creep in – make a dragonfly or two or three.

 

 

Gather dry maple seeds and tiny twig pieces. Stand the stick up in a short container of sand or similar material. Put a dab of hot glue on the seed pod end (I compressed the pod first) and attach to the twig, holding for a few moments until the glue holds. You can then add color with paint or glitter. If I had had beads handy, I would have put two on for eyes.

 

 

If using tacky glue, place the seeds on your work surface with end touching, add a drop the glue and rest the twig on top unit the glue dries.

 

 

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

February, 2018

Imbolc Incense

Merry meet.

The smell of the ocean. The scent of a forest of pines. The aroma of bacon cooking. Each not only has a unique smell, they also touch us in other ways, eliciting memories and emotions, and shaping perceptions. Our sense of smell is strong, and sometimes unconscious, and it can set the mood. (For the record, dogs do not have a better sense of smell than do humans.) Think of it smells as aromatherapy. All I have to do is smell sage burning and my mind relaxes as my body absorbs its healing and my spirit absorbs it wisdom.

When cleansing a space, setting the mood for a meditation or celebrating a sabbat, consider making incense a part of the ceremony. For centuries, people of many cultures have used mixtures of herbs, berries, bark, flowers, resins and other botanicals to send their prayers up to the gods – by throwing them into a sacred fire as well as by burning them in a censer swung by a priest walking down the aisle of a Catholic church.

While many wonderful blends can be found, it’s easy to make your own. With astrological Imbolc coming on February 3 this year, there is still time.

Everything has its own energy, and you will add your intent while mixing them. All of that is released when it’s burned.

Depending on the source, correspondences list cinnamon, myrrh, vanilla, violet, wisteria, basil and bay as incenses for Imbolc, or they list chamomile, frankincense, jasmine, lavender, myrrh and rosemary. Another source gives basil, camphor, cinnamon, lotus, frankincense, myrrh, basil, jasmine and wisteria. The lists you will find will differ as well.

Sometimes I look for ingredients common to multiple lists – in this case, myrrh is on three while cinnamon, frankincense, basil, jasmine and wisteria are on two of the three lists – but most times I go by what I’m drawn to. When I feel limited by what I have on hand, I remember what Rosenari Roast, a wise herbalist, once told me: “I have found magical blends to have more to do with one’s own personal relationship with the plants than any recipe, formula or dogma. And what one has on hand at a time of need is there with reason, purpose and value.

The easiest to make is loose incense that is burned on a charcoal disk (a pinch at a time) or tossed into a fire (by the handful).

When using essential oils or resins, combine them first, mashing them together in your mortar with your pestle. When they are gummy, add any berries or bark. Dried herbs and flowers are added next, with powdery items put in last. As you work, focus on your intent, perhaps using a chant or an incantation while blending the ingredients. Store in a tightly sealed jar.

Patti Wigington gives this recipe for Imbolc incense on thoughtco.com, explaining it “evokes the scents of a chilly winter night, with a hint of spring florals.

2 parts cedar
2 parts frankincense
1 part pine resin
1 part cinnamon
1 part orange peel
1/2 part rose petals

The Real Witch’s Kitchen” by Kate West offers several recipes, including these:

Imbolc Incense 1
3 parts frankincense
2 parts dragon’s blood
1 part cinnamon
1/2 part red sandalwood
a few drops of red wine


To this mixture add a pinch of the first flower available in your area (dry it first) at the time of Imbolc.

 

Imbolc Incense 2
3 parts cinnamon
2 parts rosemary
1 part frankincense
1 part myrrh
1 part bay
1 part basil

 

Imbolc Incense 5
3 parts frankincense
1 part myrrh
1 part cinnamon
½ part sandalwood
½ part jasmine flowers
3 drops sherry or sweet white wine

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

August, 2017

Hand Fasting Gifts

 

 

Merry meet.

 

While couples planning weddings take advantage of gift registries at every place from The Home Depot to Crate and Barrel, couples who are hand fasting may appreciate a more pagan, creative and personal approach to gift giving.

 

At the urging of others, one couple I know visited their favorite pagan store and with the owner’s cooperation, made a list of items they liked. Those who wanted could look at the list and choose something without stressing over second guessing which book, what incense or the best color for an altar cloth. By the owner maintaining the list, it was helpful to know, for instance, someone had already gotten the wooden box with the pentacle on top.

 

(This box is available at magicraftshop on etsy.  You can view it by clicking HERE.)

 

Those who prefer to craft a gift have many options pagans will positively prize.

 

(There are a variety of ribbons to be found.  From the craft stores to your local dollar stores.)

 

If the couple is not making their own cord, you might want to craft it. It can be braided from ribbons with charms attached.

 

 

(These are just a few Pagan themed Charms you can use.)

 

Those wanting a challenge can try the five-string braid. In addition to ribbons, lace, trims and drapery cording found in fabric stores, and strings of beads found in craft stores can be incorporated. For a fall ceremony, consider wearing in a string of dried corn kernels, or strings of tiny shells for a hand fasting on the beach. Figure a finished length of at least six feet so that it can be wrapped around the wrists and knotted three times. If the number of people attending is small, you might organize its making by having each guest contribute the desired length of ribbon, lace, etc. Charms and color themes can be considered. As part of the ritual, they would be woven together with everyone’s intentions for a loving relationship.

 

(These handfasting brooms are available at BROOMCHICK on etsy.  You can view them by clicking HERE.)

 

A common hand fasting tradition is jumping the broom, making that another gift that would be welcomed. It can be purchased or made from twigs or other botanicals attached to a branch. It would then be decorated with lace, ribbons, flowers and other embellishments. Afterwards, the couple can hang the broom above a door or a mantle.

 

(Hand painted wine glasses.)

 

Painting champagne flutes or a chalice are other gifts that could be used as part of the hand fasting ceremony.

 

(Flower crown & hair pieces.)

 

Crowns for the couple can be made from flowers, leaves, antlers, feathers, vines, shells, handles from spoons and forks, or crystals – or any combination. If a man would rather wear a medieval style hat or even a top hat, it could be decorated with the same types of materials.

 

(Homemade, dressed talisman candle.)

 

What pagan ever has enough candles? You don’t have to be pouring wax to make a spell candle for the couple, you can start with any candle you choose, and using a selection of oils, chants, intentions, carvings and Reiki, turn it into a one-of-a-kind gift.

 

(This Grimoire is available at TheMadamePhoenix on etsy.  You can view it HERE.)

 

Smudge sticks, incense, tea blends and decorated journals are other ideas.

 

 

(The Magical of Crafting Charm Bags comes out on Oct. 1, 2017. Click link on bottom of page to pre-order.)

 

I happen to like making mojo bags, and would consider making one for the couple with herbs, stones, a miniature tarot card or two, runes and other objects holding my intentions.

 

These are just a few ideas for making a hand fasting gift both crafty and Craft-y. I’m sure there are many more.

 

Merry part. And merry meet again.

 

 

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