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Book Review – Sacred Art A Hollow Bone For Spirit: Where Art Meets Shamanism by Imelda Almqvist

March, 2019

Book Review
Sacred art A Hollow Bone For Spirit
Where Art Meets Shamanism
by Imelda Almqvist

As a sacred art student of Imelda’s I was eager to get my hands on this book. Her teachings have had a profound impact upon my journeys within journeys unfolding and unfurling as the art is created.

This is a truly inspiring book taking you on a journey of the history of art from rock paintings through to “mo-dern” day art. A journey which shows how art, region, science, alchemy and cosmology were all once interwoven and how unfortunately they became split in our need to break things apart. Your thoughts, ideas, perceptions of art are stretched – everything is art when you look around and within. And then another journey is embarked upon a journey of self-discovery as you are invited to drop down into a new place, to hollow yourself out, deeply immerse yourself in a place that has no room for ego. For me at the Introduction to Sacred art Workshop the most important and powerful part was starting by burning my limiting beliefs and this book does the same. The first activity is burning your own limiting beliefs, all thoughts of I am not an artist, I can’t draw, paint, create, will fade away as you drop into a new place as you become a hollow bone and you begin to make your own Sacred art; with opportunities to meet other beings, gods, goddesses along the way, work with them and let them speak through your art.

Imelda begins to weave all that we have split apart back together and encourages us to do the same and encourages and inspires you to see how they are all interlinked, all part of the one web of life. Imelda’s passion and thirst for the subject shines through, her excitement at continuing to learn herself, inviting you the reader to delve into the work of other authors and artists; new books to learn from and art videos to watch. The same can be said for your own work during her Sacred art Retreats; journeys become deeper and a richer experience, the art created afterwards continues the journey, more is revealed within the words, the colours, the fabrics, all are part of the journey. The art is interwoven with all that happened within the journey and more, weaving back together the threads of all that has been broken. Her teachings will take you to another level coming away feeling that something magical and profound has happened to you and your life will never be the same again.

As
you weave your way through the book and activities I feel sure that
you will begin to look at art and the world around you in a whole new
way. You may well find some of your beliefs of not only yourself but
the landscape around you challenged and this in turn encourages an
exploration and work with your own shadow.

No artistic skills or shamanic experience required. This book does exactly what it says; it teaches you how art and shamanism meet and how you can create with them. Best of all it’ll widen your perception of art and allow you to let your ego move aside and make your very own Sacred art.

Sacred art isn’t something to be just read about, it is something to do, something powerful and profound. I urge you to fully immerse yourself in this book, to become a hollow bone unleashing your inner artist from shy stumbling steps to liberation.

Sacred art – A Hollow Bone for Spirit: Where art Meets Shamanism on Amazon

***

About the Author:

Lyn Hill has over 20 years’ of experience of working as a Holistic Practitioner with survivors from Bosnia, with life changing injuries and profound trauma, adults affected by substance use and mental health issues, people experiencing chronic and enduring pain. 

In
2012 Lyn’s path took her to exploring the sacred feminine and
Shamanic Healing, which led to learning with the Sacred Trust, Centre
for Shamanic Arts, and the School of Shamanic Womancraft.  A
life changing journey began in March 2018 during an Introduction to
Sacred Art with Imelda Almqvist.  Stirring the inner child and
bringing creativity back to the surface.  Taking her Shamanic
work in a new direction sees Lyn starting a 2 year Norse Shamanic
Practitioner training this year.

Lyn offers guidance and healing, taking clients on a journey of encouragement and awakening drawing together Shamanic Healing, Sacred Art, Reiki, Crystals, Reflexology, Aromatherapy, Well Woman (Womb) Yoga and Restorative Yoga. Lyn offers one to one work and Circle Work. Her passion is bringing women back home to themselves reconnecting with their inner wisdom and knowing, particularly around the menopause, from the time leading into the peri-menopause all the way through and out the other side.

Lyn’s dream is to one day have a book published of her nature inspired poetry

sacredawakenings.co.uk

GoodGod!

December, 2018

Meet the Gods: Mithras, the Pagan Christ Child

 

(This figure of the Persian god Mithras is at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D.C.)

 

Merry meet.

Mithras, god of the sun in ancient Rome, was born around the winter solstice and experienced a resurrection around the spring equinox. The ancient Persian-Roman religion called Mithraism thrived before Christianity, dating back some 4,000 years. It gains attention because the similarities between his story and that of Jesus are numerous.

He was born of the virgin Anahita on December 25. He was, according to an article on truthbeknown. com by Acharya S. and D.M. Murdock, “wrapped in swaddling clothes, placed in a manger and attended by shepherds.”

He traveled far and wide as a teacher and a master who performed miracles and had 12 companions. He was omniscient. Both the lion and the lamb were his symbols. Hundreds of years before the birth of Jesus, the Lord’s Day, or Sunday, was said to be Mithras’ sacred day. Baptisms were important, midnight services were held and he was often said to carry a lamb on his shoulders. Mithraism’s scared rock was Petra.

As the ‘great bull of the Sun,’ Mithra sacrificed himself for world peace. He ascended into heaven. Mithra was viewed as the Good Shepherd, the ‘Way, the Truth and the Light,’ the Redeemer, the Savior, the Messiah,” according to the article.

Mithra was worshiped as Mitra or Itu in the Indian Vedic religion. It is believed he was born in a cave on December 25 and was the mediator between man and god.

 

(In this relief from the 2nd century AD, Mithras kills the sacred bull and from its blood and semen arise the plants and animals. Source: Neues Museum, Berlin)

 

His cult spread from India west to Germany, Spain and England, and was supported by soldiers of the Roman Empire, becoming the primary rival to the newly developing religion of Christianity. In 307, Diocletian consecrated a temple on the Danube River to Mithra, “Protector of the Empire,” as stated in britannica.com.

According to myth, Mithra was born, bearing a torch and armed with a knife, beside a sacred stream and under a sacred tree, a child of the earth itself. He soon rode, and later killed, the life-giving cosmic bull, whose blood fertilizes all vegetation. Mithra’s slaying of the bull was a popular subject of Hellenic art and became the prototype for a bull-slaying ritual of fertility in the Mithraic cult,” according to the entry written by the editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica.

Mithra, also spelled Mithras, was the god of light in ancient Indo-Iranian mythology.

The Persian version of Mithra was a benevolent solar deity bestowing wealth and health.

He was mighty, strong, unconquered and king of the gods, and was often portrayed as a sun disc in a chariot drawn by white horses.

Winter festivals, common in cultures around the world, were intended to strengthen the fire of the sun so that it would return. They were celebrated in the name of Mithras, who can be called as a god to your circle this Yule.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

GoodGod!

October, 2018

Meet the Gods: Chernobog

(“Day and Night (Belobog and Chernobog) by Maxim Sukharev)

Merry meet.

This time of the waning year is the time of the dark gods, who balance the gods of the light during the waxing year.

Slavic god Belobog is the “White God,” with his sunshine that brings life. He is prayed to for a plentiful harvest, and for a light that guides through dark times and places. Belobog appears only during daylight, wearing a white robe and holding a staff. He brings good things to those he meets.

Belobog’s brother is Chernobog, the equally powerful god of the dark who rules the night, and is associated with evil and devastation.

Twice each year the two brothers dueled, with the winner controlling the season along the length of the day and night.

The Black God survives in numerous Slavic curses and in a White God, whose aid is sought to obtain protection or mercy,” Evel Gasparini wrote in “Slavic religion” on britannica.com.

(“Creation of the Earth (Belobog and Chernobog)” by Maxim Sukharev)

Chernobog was associated with bleak attributes such as cold, famine, poverty and illness. Despite this, he is still respected among all the other gods,” Ivan wrote in “12 Gods Of Slavic Mythology And Their Amazing Powers” on ancient-code.com.

In that tradition, the dark was respected, as was the light, knowing it was necessary of cosmic balance, and knowing each year, they would find their way back to the light. These cycles of the universe were due to the polarizing actions of Chernobog and Belobog, Ivan wrote.

Egyptian brothers Set and Horus engage in a similar struggle between light and dark, providing a symbol of harmony. Set, the god of darkness, was associated with evil, deserts, wastelands and the northern stars; although he murdered his brother he was still seen as a protector and a source of strength. He was wild and untamed with bright red hair. Horus was depicted as a winged sun disk. He was the god of the east and of sunrise, and also the god associated with the sunset.

In other cultures, the Greek god of darkness was Erebos while Hodr was the Norse god of winter and darkness. Known for murdering his brother, Set was the Egyptian god of darkness and evil. According to anglefire.com, “Itzcolihuqui was the Atzec demon god of darkness, deep freeze, volcanoes and disaster.”

As the darkness grows, working with these gods can offer strength and power.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

GoodGod!

August, 2018

Meet the Gods: Dionysos

Merry meet.

This month we get to know Dionysos, the Olympian god of the grape harvest, wine and wine making as well as the god of ritual madness, wild frenzy, festivity and pleasure. He is also called Bacchus.

He was usually accompanied by Satyrs (lustful, drunken woodland deities who were part human and part horse or goat) and Mainades (frenzied female devotees).

The thyrsos (a staff topped with a pinecone), a crown of ivy, fruiting grapevines, a drinking cup and a panther are all associated with him. Frequently represented in ancient art, he was first shown as a mature, bearded adult wearing an ivy wreath and a long robe that was sometimes draped with the skin of a fawn or a feline. In later times, he was depicted as youthful and beardless, effeminate, and partially or entirely nude.As such he is among the most versatile and elusive Greek gods.

According to mythagora.com, Dionysos’ life began with intrigue and disaster. “Zeus was attracted to the lovely princess of Thebes but his appreciation of Thyone did not escape the notice of his sister/wife, Hera. The vengeful goddess dared not interfere overtly with Zeus’s affairs but she was a master of subtlety. When it became obvious that Thyone was pregnant, Hera enchanted Thyone and induced her ask Zeus to come to her in his radiant splendor. Zeus was flattered and revealed himself to Thyone in all his flaming glory … she was utterly consumed by the flames.

Zeus’s son Hermes rescued Thyone’s premature child from the conflagration that consumed Thyone’s mortal body and gave the babe to a woman named Makris, daughter of Aristaios, on the island of Euboia. Makris did what she could to sooth the child but Hera was quick to realize what had happened … she drove Makris from her home. Zeus took the infant from Makris and sewed it into his thigh so that it might have his protection.”

Dionysos later journeys to the underworld, gets his mother and takes “her to Olympus where Zeus transformed into the goddess Thyone,” according to the Theo Greek Mythology website.

When Dionysos and his companions as were traveling through the Land of Thrakian, the king drove them into the sea. “As punishment,” the website states, “the god inflicted him with madness causing him to murder his wife and son and mutilate himself with an axe.

When King Pentheus of Thebes refused to accept Dionysos’ divinity, Dionysos retaliated by driving the king’s daughters into a crazed frenzy and they tore him apart limb from limb, Theo Greek Mythology states.

Another myth shared on the website tells of Dionysos traveling through the Aegean Sea when he was captured by a band of Tyrrhenian pirates who planned to sell him into slavery. “The god infested their ship with phantoms of creeping vines and wild beasts, and in terror the men leapt overboard and were transformed into dolphins.”

Dionysos married princess Ariadne of Krete (Crete) whom he found abandoned by Theseus on an island.


He traveled as far as India, and upon his return to Greece, those who welcomed him adopted his rituals. His followers also wore or carried pinecone-topped staffs, ivy crowns and drinking cups. Dionysos punished those who rejected him with madness or physical afflictions, or he would turn them into animals. Over time, drinking wine became his sacrament, even to the point of drunkenness.

According to N.S. Gill’s article on Thoughtco.com, “Dionysos is a patron of the theater and an agricultural/fertility god. … Writers often contrast Dionysus with his half-brother Apollo. Where Apollo personifies the cerebral aspects of mankind, Dionysus represents the libido and gratification.”

Despite being the creator and god of wine, the ritual madness associated with Dionysus did not involve alcohol or drugs. “Their wild dancing and estate ecstatic behaviour were interpreted as ‘madness’ only by the uninitiated,” according to the Ancient World Project at the University of Michigan.

Greek theater is said to come from the worship of Dionysus in Athens. The Theater of Dionysus held 17,000. Plays were performed honoring Dionysus as god of wine. It’s said that tragedies dramatized his negative and destructive traits while comedies incorporated innocence, humor and his many festivals

When you incorporate wine into your celebrations, rituals, or for cakes and ale, honoring Dionysus can bring fertility and gratification.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:


Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

GoodGod!

June, 2018

Meet the Gods: Bes

 

 

Merry meet.

Bes was an Egyptian god who brought comfort and protection to mothers and children. The somewhat comical, somewhat sinister-looking bearded dwarf looks human but is often also portrayed as part animal – generally a lion with a mane and tail, or with wings. He has a plump body, bow legs, prominent genitals and is sticking out his tongue. He is always shown facing forwards, unlike most Egyptian Gods who are shown in profile. On occasion, Bes is wearing a plumed headdress or a crown, and carrying a rattle, drum, tambourine or knife.

 

 

Also known as Bisu and Aha, he was a deity and a demonic fighter. A god of war, “he was also a patron of childbirth and the home, and was associated with sexuality, humour, music and dancing,” according to ancientegyptonline.co.uk. “Although he began as a protector of the pharaoh, he became very popular with every day Egyptian people because he protected women and children above all others. He had no temples and there were no priests ordained in his name. However, he was one of the most popular gods of ancient Egypt and was often depicted on household items such as furniture, mirrors and cosmetics containers and applicators as well as magical wands and knives.”

Apparently, he got the name Aha, meaning fighter, because he could kill lions, bears and snakes with his hands. Although labeled a demon, there he was not considered evil, but rather, drove evil spirits away.

Laboring mothers would call on Bes for help. It is said he would stay on after birth to protect and entertain the child, and that when a baby smiled for no apparent reason, it was because Bes was making funny faces for them.

 

 

Using dance and music, he would also chase away bad spirits during sex and sleep. That’s why he could be found carved into the legs of beds – to protect people during the night when they were most vulnerable.

Egyptians would put a statue of him near the door to protect their home from evil spirits wanting to cause harm. He appeared on the walls of temples and homes, and was on thousands of amulets and charms, protecting people from the dangers of everyday life such as menacing animals and food going bad.

 

 

Bes is the first subject to be identified in early Egyptian tattoos, according to “Tattoo: Symbol and Meanings,” by Jack Watkins.

Performers often had tattoos of Bes because of his association with dancing and music. It is also thought that sacred prostitutes may have had a tattoo of Bes placed near their pubic area in order to prevent venereal diseases, but it is also possible that the tattoos related to fertility,” Watkins wrote.

Bes’ wife, Beset, was the female version of himself. Images of them naked were painted on walls.

Merry part. And merry meet again

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

GoodGod!

May, 2018

Meet the Gods: Dagda

(This illustration of Dagda was found on Pinterest. His cauldron, known as the Undry or the Cauldron of Plenty, provided infinite food and drink but never to a coward or an oath breaker. It was also said to revive the dead. One end of his enormous club could kill while the other end could give life.)

 

Merry meet.

The name of the Celtic god Dagda means “Good God.” He’s also known as Eochaid Ollathair, meaning “Eochaid the All-Father.” His name is typically proceeded by the article “the.”

In the Celtic tradition, the Dagda is one of the leaders of a mythological Irish people, the Tuatha Dé Danann, “People of the Goddess Danu.”

These were a group of people, descended from Nemed, who had been exiled from Ireland, and scattered. It is thought that Danu offered them her patronage, under which they succeeded in rebanding, learning new and magical skills, and returning to Ireland in a magical mist,” according to Bard Mythologies.

Britannica.com states, “The Dagda was credited with many powers and possessed a cauldron that was never empty, fruit trees that were never barren, and two pigs – one live and the other perpetually roasting. He also had a huge club that had the power both to kill men and to restore them to life. With his harp, which played by itself, he summoned the seasons.”

Some sources have him married to the sinister war goddess Morrígan. At least one of his many children was borne by the goddess of the River Boyne.

The Dagda is generally described as being a large man, sometimes comically so, with a tremendous appetite and immense capacity. It was said that to make his porridge he needed 80 gallons of milk as well as several whole sheep, pigs, and goats, and that he ate this meal with a ladle large enough to hold two people lying down,” Morgan Daimler wrote in “Pagan Portals – Gods & Goddess of Ireland,” citing “A Child’s Eye View of Irish Paganism,” by Blackbird O’Connell.

 

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Daimler notes the Dagda is often described as having red hair and wearing a short tunic. He is strong and able to accomplish “great feats such building a fort single-handedly.” Every power was his.

He is called the Excellent God, the Lord of Perfect Knowledge and all Father. His central attribute is the Sacred Fire and, like it, he is always hungry, ready to consume the offerings; he is also a red god. The Dagda is also a phallic deity [fitting for Beltane], his lust matching his hunger. He is the father of many of the Tuatha De but his key function is as Druid of the Gods,” according to an article published on adf.org.

Druidic magic, abundance and great skill are among the attributes associated with the Dagda.

From my research, it seems he would appreciate offerings of large quantities of dark ale or beer, and oat bannocks, a porridge, particularly if butter and bacon are added. One source noted they should be offered to the fire.

A cauldron and a club or staff, Daimler suggested, could be his symbols in works of magic.

He is called on for wisdom, victory in law or judgement, and bounty. In a time of need, I can see putting out my cauldron, perhaps with a fire in it, and call the Dagda and his Cauldron of Plenty for help. Because his cauldron also serves as a tool of rebirth and regeneration, I would also call upon that power when going through a difficult ending on the way to a rebirth.

(“Dagda – Celtic All Father,” was handcrafted by James Miller from StonecraftArts. Sculpted in wax based clay and cast in architectural concrete, this plaque is available on Etsy.)

 

James Miller, a sculptor from Colorado, is of Celtic and Germanic descent.

He is part of my cultural heritage, so I honor him as an archetype of the ideal masculine,” James said, adding, “His name actually means ‘the good one.’”

He finds people are more receptive to learning about gods, goddesses and ancient traditions when they are framed in a cultural rather than religious context.

Merry part. And merry meet again

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

Sacred Art Video

April, 2018

YMIR AND ORION

First Ancestor, First Shaman

 

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRE8XkyY2ts[/embedyt]

During a sunset walk in the snow, one afternoon in Sweden, the star constellation Orion appearing gave me a powerful vision that involved the primordial giant of Norse mythology: frost giant Ymir. (In truth I had never before assumed any connection between them!)

Ymir was the First Ancestor and First Shaman. The gods dismembered him and created the world from his body parts.

Therefore Ymir was the first person to die and he became the Lord of the Dead.

The word root of the name Ymir means “twins”. A profound mystery involving twins resides in both the night sky and world mythology.

Watch this video to find out more…

Imelda Almqvist

***

About the Author:

Imelda Almqvist is an international teacher of shamanism and sacred art. Her book Natural Born Shamans: A Spiritual Toolkit For Life (Using shamanism creatively with young people of all ages) was published by Moon Books in 2016.  She is a presenter on the Shamanism Global Summit  2017 as well as on Year of Ceremony with Sounds True. She divides her time between the UK, Sweden and the US. Her second book SACRED ART, A Hollow Bone for Spirit : Where Art Meets Shamanism will be published in December 2018.

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www.shaman-healer-painter.co.uk  (website)

https://imeldaalmqvist.wordpress.com/  (blog)

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=imelda+almqvist  (Youtube channel: interviews, presentations and art videos)

GoodGod!

April, 2018

Meet the Gods: Dian Cécht

(art by Jane Brideson)

Merry meet.

With so many people around me sick, it was probably no coincidence I came across Dian Cécht, the Irish god of healing. It so happens a story told about him is the same as the one told about Credne, one of the three craft gods, last month. He was described as a craftsman who worked mostly in bronze and when the High King lost his arm in battle, he fashioned a functioning replacement arm from silver.

In “Pagan Portals: Gods and Goddesses of Ireland: A Guide to Irish Deities,” Morgan Daimler also tells the same story, adding that Dian Cécht also healed Midir’s wounded eye and cured plagues disguised as serpents. “There is a reference in the St. Gall’s incantations to a salve of Dian Cécht, which is used for healing. Dian Cécht was invoked with healing charms into the 8th century CE and even in modern folklore is associated with an herbal oatmeal preparation that has healing properties,” Daimler wrote.

In the Ever Living Ones blogspot, Jane Brideson offered “a prescription for Dian Cécht’s porridge,” describing it as “the oldest-known Irish medical remedy.” It’s made of oatmeal, dandelion, hazel buds, chickweed and wood sorrel.

Multiple sources speak of Dian Cécht’s Well of Health, Tiopra Sláine, said to contain one of every herb that grew in Ireland. Wounded warriors bathed in the water were healed.

Daimler writes, “Dian Cécht was considered the supreme physician of the Gods and possessed a well or cauldron, the Sláine, into which the wounded could be placed and from which they would emerge restored. Throughout the Irish texts where he appears he is renowned for his healing skill and he is called ‘the healing sage of Ireland’ and ‘God of health.’”

As the god of healing, he is associated with physicians and restoring of the body.

He is not only a god of active healing, but also of the knowledge of healing arts and of healing magic. He is known as a superlative healer with any method. We don’t have many existing myths featuring Dian Cécht, but the ones we do have generally center on his healing skill in one way or another,” Daimler wrote.

His name is thought to translate as swift for dían and power for cécht, yet another source said the name appeared to mean God of the Plowshare.

Dian Cécht was also known as Cainte, a chanter of spells and prophecy. His titles include god of power and health and sage of leechcraft,” Brideson wrote.

A well or a cauldron are associated with him, and can be used to symbolize him. Offerings could include water, medicinal herbs or herbal tea. He may be called on for anything related to healing or medicine, when wishing to heal or be healed.

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Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

“Pagans are Rejecting the Gods”

April, 2018

(Photo by Alex Iby on Unsplash)

And so I shake my head.

The new trend, the hip trend, the “youth” trend is gender-fluid and “godless”. Well because I read, and I am both old and young for the generation I happen to have peers with I can tell you categorically and excuse me: THIS IS NOT A NEW IDEA TO PAGANS.

Pagans have always been more open to what gender and identity can mean. From the trans priests of Inanna (4000 BC) to pagan Gods like Thor dressing as a woman. In fact hard concepts of what was male and female are really a Renaissance or post-Mediaeval idea. There have always been gender fluid and trans people. Hidden perhaps, and definitely not usually written about but always there.

The idea there is one kind of “acceptable” Wiccan belief, one kind of “acceptable” paganism belief is wrong. It has never been right. In fact in books by Stewart Farrar and Lois Bourne while the ritual always included a God and Goddess or Lord and Lady there was no strict idea of what this meant. To some it was a psychological construct! That’s right! It was for some about ritualised spiritual and psychological healing. A form of catharsis based on Jungian ideas that humans contain both male and female aspects that required care. As such the female that is often extremely suppressed culturally was brought into the fore to heal and educate. It was never about having a universal meaning. The ritual was the important thing. What you did and said, how you said it, but everything else was open to interpretation.

The idea that Goddesses and Gods must mean the same thing to everyone is an internet idea.

While Wicca exploded as a concept once the anonymous online happened in the 1990’s it also allowed there to be “experts” who wouldn’t have been given the time of day in their local moot, to have an equal or even raised standing. Some of that is fine, but it tends to make folks zealous and preachy. It needed to make itself a “proper” religion and it lost some of the intellectual and gnostic meanings.

If you go back and read occult books written before we were “out and proud” there are bread crumbs, ideas about balance. Ideas about magickal, spiritual and life balance gained through ritual and through sexual relationships*.

The idea that we have to be one thing or another, believers or cynics, rational or spiritual is a false dichotomy. This ignores the complexity of the human experience. In Farrar’s work it states women could be a substitute “man” in a ritual context with the addition of a belt and athame. Men (whom were the socially privileged and dominant cultural force) were not permitted to take a woman’s place. This is often seen as intolerance but it is about the balance. The social, spiritual and ritual balance of energy. That said there were ritual where men did dress as women but it was a deep and hidden ritual about ultimate spiritual balance and enlightenment. It is also true that the Hierophant was often a role in 20th century ritual and even before that. A gender neutral older magickal practitioner role to aid, observe and conduct the balance between the male and female aspects. Sounds pretty gender fluid to me.

To recap: your personal belief in Lord and Lady was largely considered irrelevant and you could be either or both within a ritual setting for a very long time. What mattered was the ritual. The concepts of balance within and without. That female was not lesser, but powerful and beautiful. Whether you felt that the Gods were ideas, internal and or magickal concepts or living breathing beings or all of these things was not a debate. Not important at all. It was the gnostic ideas of revelation, balance and growth.

My advice, which you can of course take or leave, would be do the work. Read the older books. Look within and without and find those balances. Do a ritual that draws in or balances your energies with your opposite. Embrace those whom and different than you. Embrace the God and Goddess within yourself. It will change you. Not because you abandon reason, but because you take into yourself more than you think you can be.

*This is a complicated and often dated concept but the idea that you have lovers to learn and heal yourself and this person is a lot more modern that Dion Fortunes 1920’s Britain would have largely accepted.

 

 

GoodGod!

March, 2018

Meet the Gods: The Three Craft Gods of the Danann

Merry meet.

In Irish mythology, there are brothers who are ‘The Three Craft Gods of the Danann.’ They are also called ‘The Three Gods of Skill of the Tuatha Dé Danann.’ Brigid and Tuireann are their parents.

Credne – or Creidne in Old Irish and Creidhne in modern Irish – was a craftsman who worked mostly in bronze, but also in brass and gold. When Nuada, the High King of the Tuatha Dé Danann, lost his arm in battle, it was Credne who fashioned a replacement arm from silver.

(Photo by Nicolas Hoizey on Unsplash)

Goibniuis the blacksmith. He also is connected with hospitality & putting on feasts for the gods. One source said he had a magic cow, Glas Gaibhnenn (glas-gav-e-lan), prized for giving profuse quantities of milk.

Luchta or Luchtaine, is the carpenter. He was considered the patron of woodworking and wheel making.

The three of them forged weapons for Tuatha De, the ancient divine race of the Mother Goddess Danu (the enchanted, mystical beings, fairies and leprechauns) when they fought the abominable giants and monsters whose magic was strong. Credo provided sword hilts, spear rivets and the conical pieces of thick metal in the center of a shield that protect the user’s hand.

Those working in any of these crafts and seeking the skill or protection from one of these brothers could place an item on the altar that is a tool of the trade such as a hammer or chisel, or small items made by someone in the trade. Offerings could include water or ale, along with raw materials such as precious or semiprecious metals, or a piece of wood.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

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