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mythology

GoodGod!

March, 2019

Meet the Gods: Jarilo

(https://www.slavorum.org/)

Merry
meet.

While
Ostara (also called Eostre and Eastre) is the Germanic goddess of
spring and dawn, there appears to be no equivalent Germanic god of
spring. There is, however, a handsome, young Slavic god of spring and
fertility – Jarilo. He was born on the night of the Slavic new
year and was the tenth son of Perun, the god of thunder.

Veles,
the Slavic god of the Underworld, kidnapped Jarilo from his cradle.
As a result, winter overtook the land. Vegetation died and fertility
was suspended. Jarilo escaped, arriving home in spring at which time
flowers bloomed, birds sang and fertility festivals (some called them
orgies) were held.

Each
year the cycle of death and rebirth repeats, much like it does with
the goddess Persephone. Each spring Jarilo returns on a white horse,
celebrating the sun’s resurrection, so he was also considered a sun
god. He was the god of vegetation, too, because he enabled crops to
grow, protecting and defending them from natural disasters.

According
to the website Meet the Slavs, “People used flowers, branches,
leaves to adorn houses and barns. The wreaths were also made and
thrown into the river or stream. Slavs sacrificed cattle to Jarilo,
usually a ram or a goat. The priests sometimes sacrificed deer whose
head was placed in front of the statue of God. When there existed
threat of drought, rituals devoted to Jarilo included entire nation,
so whole community prayed to God for rain.”

Also
known as Gerovit, Jared and Rudjevid, he would protect the weak and
helpless as a god of war. According to the same source, he demanded
peace and harmony, and carried an olive branch in one hand and a
sword in the other, but used “only in cases when difficulties could
not be solved in other ways.”

Besides
temples, Jarilo’s places were rivers, forests and cemeteries.

The
month with which he is associated began March 21, when the sun
entered the sign of Aries. For that reason, a ram was often
sacrificed in his honor on the equinox.

As he returned to the world in the spring, according to theonetruejustice.wordpress.com, “by happenstance the lady he met was his own twin sister Marzanna (Morana), the goddess of nature, winter, and decay. Incestual relationship was a really popular thing for gods back in the day, so they soon fell in love and got married on the evening of the summer solstice.”

As
that story goes, when she found out her brother/husband was
unfaithful, she gathered the gods and together they murder Jarilo,
dismembering him in a ritualistic sacrifice and forcing him back into
the underworld. Marzanna becomes heartbroken and cruel. The cycle of
death and rebirth allows Jarilo to meet, marry, and be dismembered by
his sister year after year.

This
Ostara, if you wish to call a god into your circle, Jarilo is one
option. You could try putting an olive branch and a sword on your
altar. You might also use a symbol of Aries or a ram, branches,
flowers and other signs of spring.

If
you would like a goddess from the same pantheon for your sabbat, get
to know Kostroma, the East Slavic goddess of fertility and
fruitfulness. In mythology, she was the one that provides fertility
and abundance of land, invoked every spring through various rituals.
Kostroma brings those born on this day a special talent in writing
and speaking. Kostroma is also the goddess of signs and coincidences,
according to “The World of Ancient Gods – Slavic Goddesses” on
Meet the Slavs’ website.

Merry
part. And merry meet again.

***

About
the Author:

Lynn
Woike
 was
50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before
she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She
draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her
Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae,
Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling
from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses
Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making
her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the
work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with
her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can
follow her boards on Pinterest,
and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

March, 2019

Akhilanda

(artwork
by Pieter Weltevrede)

Akhilanda
is the Hindu Goddess of Never Not Broken. Her formal name is
Akhilandeswari Ma, and is known informally as Khodiyar Ma, a form of
the Great Mother Goddess.

In
Sanskrit, Akhilanda means “never not
broken” and Ishwari is Goddess or female
power. She is one of India’s oldest
depictions of the Goddess.

She
is said to be originally a Vedic Goddess, the Vedas being the oldest
layer of Sanskrit scripture. She is also known as the Goddess of the
“agamas”, the
texts known as tantra. She has been described as a form of the
Goddess Parvati and as associated with Goddess Durga.

She
carries a trident and stands upon a
crocodile upon a rushing river.

(Image credit: hinduismtoday.com)

“Everything
happens for my liberation. I choose to become only more love”
– Divine Feminine Oracle

She
moves and allows herself to be moved by the motion of the crocodile
upon the rushing waters of the river. She surrenders herself to the
movement.

(Image Credit: MEDIUM.COM)

Her
power comes from being pulled apart and coming back together again;
always broken, so she can never BE broken. She is destroyed (broken)
and created/re-created again and again.

Akhilanda
represents where we are broken, our pieces instead of our whole. The
crocodile is our fears, our vulnerabilities.

She
teaches us that our power is in our pain and that we have the
strength and ability to pull ourselves back together, again and
again, after breaking. We re-create and rebuild ourselves over and
over into whom we wish to be.

Akhilandra
is there to help us transition from one place to another after we are
hurt, when we feel sadness, when we have suffered loss. She assists
us to grow, to transform, to heal and mend those broken bits and
pieces. Just as she surrenders to the motion of the crocodile and
the waters of the river, so we should surrender to whatever we are
feeling, trusting that we will once again be whole.

***

About
the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is [email protected]

My Name is Isis on Amazon

Book Review – Psychedelic Mystery Traditions: Spirit Plants – Magical Practices – Ecstatic States by Thomas Hatsis

February, 2019

Book Review
Psychedelic Mystery Traditions
Spirit Plants – Magical Practices – Ecstatic States
By Thomas Hatsis
271 pp. Park Street Press

Although it has been the subject of great speculation and demonetization by various religious and political bodies, psychedelic mystery tradition remains one of the great buried seeds of Paganism, hidden under mythology, misinformation, and religious and political oppression — not to mention suppression of information. In “Psychedelic Mystery Traditions,” Thomas Hatsis uncovers a vast history of psychedelic spirit plants in Western tradition and ritual, focusing especially on Greco-Roman tradition and the early days of Christianity.

From
the earliest prehistoric discoveries of psychedelic plants and their
spiritual potential to the conflation of their use with Satanic
witchcraft, Hatsis delves deeply, weaving together the political
scenes in which each stage of pharmaka* use developed, while
following a coherent narrative through the years. For those who were
hoping for a more international subject matter, it’s useful to note
that Hatsis doesn’t verge far from the focus of Europe and the Near
East — you won’t find information here about the use of ayahuasca
in Peru, or psilocybin mushrooms in China.

What
you will find is an extensively-researched, academic approach to a
controversial subject that synthesizes herbalism, ethnopharmacology,
entheogenic practice, ritual, mythology, politics, religion, and
linguistics. This may make the book a bit slow going for those who
lack the context for the work, but anyone with a good familiarity
with Western mystical traditions, herbalism, early Christianity, or
mythology will probably find something to enjoy here.

The
book boasts a treasure trove bibliography. Hatsis occasionally cites
and refers to his other book, called “The Witches’ Ointment: The
Secret History of Psychedelic Magic,” where the subject matter
overlaps, but he also taps an impressive number of primary sources,
as well as many modern authors. In a few cases, he points them out
only to call them out, diverging at several points to argue some
misconceptions, such as the popularized idea that ergotism poisoning
is similar to the LSD experience (it’s actually much more dangerous,
poisonous, and unpleasant), or that the origins of Santa Claus lie in
the historical shamanic use of Aminata muscaria (a
popular theory for which there is little evidence). It is clear that
Hatsis has great love for this subject, but he also preserves respect
for the academic process. In exploring the controversy surrounding
the historical use of pharmaka, he has an even hand and doesn’t
play favorites on the basis of his own bias, pointing fingers not
only at those who dismissed or vilified these spirit plants, but also
at those who misused and abused these plants for nefarious purposes,
such as poisoning, manipulation, and rape.

This
rare glimpse into the mechanisms and mythology of mystery traditions
is also peppered with humorous observations, as Hatsis refers to bad
trips as “what we would call a bummer,” relates amusing
historical anecdotes, and makes the occasional pun. But where the
book shines the most is in those poetic moments when Hatsis explores
the narratives of mythology and ritual that weaved together the
experience of pharmaka by exposing and bestowing new cosmological
understanding. In these stories, the relationship between humans and
spirit plants takes on a life of its own, illuminating both the dark
recesses of the human psyche, and the strange roots of spirit plant
practice.

Psychedelic
Mystery Traditions can be found on Hatsis’
website, https://psychedelicwitch.com/,
along with many other writings and YouTube videos as well.

Psychedelic Mystery Traditions: Spirit Plants, Magical Practices, and Ecstatic States on Amazon

[*An
all-encompassing Greek term for the various plant-derived substances
whose uses included theogenesis, medicine, recreation, aphrodisiac,
poison, and more.]

For
those whose interests are primarily herbological, here’s a short
list of some of the spirit plants and pharmaka mentioned in this
volume: 

Aconite,
amanita mascara, barley, cannabis, haoma, hash, hemlock, henbane,
kykeon, laurel, LSD, mandrake, mushrooms, opium, solanaceae
(including but not limited to Atropa belladonna), and wine.

***

About the Author:

Sarah McMenomy is
an artist and witch. Her craft incorporates herbalism, spellwork,
trance, divination, auras, and more. Her work can be found at
https://sarahmcmenomy.tumblr.com

GoodGod!

February, 2019

Meet
the Gods: Eros

Merry
meet.

With
the Hallmark holiday, Valentine’s Day, falling in February, it is
fitting to turn to lusty Eros, the Greek god of sensual love and
primal desire. The word erotic comes from his name.

In
some tellings, he is the son of Aphrodite, the goddess of sensual
love and beauty, and Ares, the god of war, or of Aphrodite and Zeus,
the king of the gods, or of Hermes, the divine messenger of the gods,
according to Britannica.

Others
say he is a
primordial god, the son of Chaos, the emptiness of the universe.
Later depictions show him not as an adult male, but as a mischievous
child. At sometime he became a winged youth that was made younger and
younger until he was the infant we see as a Valentine’s Day mascot
that the Romans knew as Cupid.

“In
early Greece, no one paid much attention to Eros, but eventually he
earned a cult of his own in Thespiae. He also was part of a cult
along with Aphrodite in Athens,” according to “Deities of Imbolc”
by Patti Wigington on ThoughtCo.com.

In
another article for ThoughtCo.com, Wigington wrote, “As a god of
lust and passion,?and fertility as well, Eros played a major role
in courtship. Offerings were made at his temples, in the form of
plants and flowers, vessels filled with sacred oils and wine,
beautifully crafted jewelry, and sacrifices.

“Eros
didn’t have too many boundaries when it came to making people fall in
love, and was considered the?protector of same-sex love?as well
as hetero relationships.”

In
honoring the lusty Eros today, and asking for his help in matters of
love, consider leaving him roses or other flowers symbolic of love,
apples or grapes. Offer eggs or hares if it’s the fertility god you
wish to honor. Wings, and a bow and arrow are also representative
offerings.

An
offering to a god is an invitation for him to enter our life. Gods
cannot force or demand our worship and cannot violate our freedom or
our conscience. Expressing gratitude, appreciation and love toward
them, allows their energy to flow back to us.

Merry
part. And merry meet again.

***

About
the Author:

Lynn
Woike
 was
50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before
she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She
draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her
Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae,
Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling
from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses
Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making
her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the
work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with
her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can
follow her boards on Pinterest,
and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

GoodGod!

January, 2019

Meet
the Gods: The Wise Men

Merry meet.

This
month’s column is not about gods. Rather it’s about saints, or,
more correctly, magi, the pagan astrologers who came to worship
Jesus. The word magic came from magi because they dabbled in the dark
arts and were referred to as sorcerers, wizards and magicians.

Tradition
refers to three wise men, but nowhere is a specific number stated; in
Eastern Christianity often there are twelve. They came “from the
east,” which most likely is now Iran. That means they could have
traveled more than 800 miles. The Christmas story has them arriving
twelve days later, but some traditions have the visit occurring as
much as two winters later. (This could explain why Herod commanded
all boys up to the age of two be killed.)

These
Zoroastrian priests, as part of their religion, had great knowledge
of astrology – others say astronomy. According to the Gospel
Matthew, these wise men were guided to look for the “king of the
Jews” by a miraculous stellar event: the Star of Bethlehem. They
brought gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.

As
part of their religion, these traveling missionaries paid particular
attention to the stars and gained an international reputation for
their knowledge of the sky, which at that time was highly regarded as
a science. As Christianity became the religion of the Romans, the
magi were no longer respected, and neither were the Jews.

No
names for the three appear in the New Testament. Legends, however,
give them a variety of different names. Melchior, also spelled
Melichior, was a Persian king, or some say scholar. Caspar, Gaspar or
Jaspar was a king of India. Balthazar, also known as Balthasar and
Balthassar, was a Babylonian scholar or an Arabian king.

Many
sources do no consider them respected kings. Rather, the magi were
uncouth and labeled as sinners because of their stargazing, sorcery
and divination. Still, Catholics and Orthodox Christians celebrate
the festival of The Three Kings, the Epiphany, on January 6. In
Germany, they have become the patron saints of travelers; their feast
day is July 23.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About
the Author:

Lynn
Woike
 was
50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before
she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She
draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her
Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae,
Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling
from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses
Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making
her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the
work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with
her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can
follow her boards on Pinterest,
and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

December, 2018

AGISCHANAK

 

As I sit here looking out at the world outside my window, covered with the first snowfall of the season, wrapped in a shawl due to the cold. My thoughts turn to Alaska and what Goddess I may find there.

 

(Image Credit: hubpages.com)

 

My search brings me to Agischanak.

Goddess of the

Mountains.

Goddess of the

Earth.

Protector of Her

people.

Agischanak is a Goddess in Southeastern Alaska. She lives on top of Mt. Edgecumbe, near Sitka.

 

(Image Credit: listverse.com)

 

She is kindly and protects Her people and all of the peoples of the Earth. However, She is also forceful and powerful, as She must be as it is She

who supports the pillar on which the Earth rests.

For visitors, She has her brother, who comes but once a year to bring her the news of the world. The trickster, Raven, also comes to visit, always attempting to woo Her away, thereby abandoning Her post. Of course, it is a post She does not abandon. Raven provokes and annoys her at his own peril, as she responds with earthquakes.

It is cold where Agischanak is holding up the Earth, and Her people come to Her and light roaring fires, as an offering, to keep Her warm.

Remember, were it not for Agischanak, the Earth would sink into the powerful depths of the ocean.

 

(Image Credit: liminallandscapes.com)

 

***

About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is [email protected]

My Name is Isis (Volume 4) on Amazon

She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

November, 2018

SEDNA

(Image Credit: yousense.info)

The story of Sedna, the Mother and Mistress of the Sea, the Goddess of marine mammals, is, to me, one of sadness and betrayal.

In the Arctic Ocean of the Inuits, Sedna lived with her family. She was very beautiful and was wooed by many in Her community. She refused them, one and all. Her father, taking matters into his own hands, gave Her to an unknown hunter, in return for fish to keep the rest of his family fed. This unknown hunter was, in reality, a bird-spirit, and whisked Sedna away while She was asleep.

Another version states that Sedna went with the unknown hunter of Her own free will, as he promised Her a life filled with everything She could dream of – warmth, and food.

Either way, to Her dismay, Her new home was not as promised, as She found herself awakening on a high cliff, in a nest, surrounded by birds.

She got a message to Her father of Her plight. Her father, Anguta, attempted to help Her by putting Her into his kayak to return Her to their home. The birds, seeing this, flew after them, surrounded the kayak, seeking vengeance for the removal of Sedna from the nest.

To save himself, Anguta, threw his daughter overboard. She reached for the side of the kayak to save Herself and Her father cut off her fingers. As She brought her arms up to reach into the kayak, he then cut off Her arms. Sedna sank to the bottom of the sea.

(Image Credit: Hanie Mold/Pernastudios – DeviantArt.com)

She became the Queen and the Goddess of the Deep, Her fingers and arms becoming the seals, walruses, whales, those ocean mammals most hunted by the Intuit.

Sedna lived, then, beneath the waves, in the Kingdom of Adlivan, the Intuit Land of the Dead, in a home-made of stone and the ribs of whales. She was responsible for sending the sea creatures to the human hunters to feed their families. She took Her responsibility seriously, but She had a provision that when one of them died, their souls would stay with their bodies for three days, whereupon they would bring news to Sedna of how the people behaved. If any of Her laws were broken, She would not send the food to the hunters. This brought Her pain.

When this happened, a Shaman had to visit Her, by passing through terrifying lands and tests, to heal and soothe Her, until Her pain had passed and things were put right once more.

Sculpture of Sedna in Nuuk, Greenland

(Image Credit: alamy.com)

**My fingers were cut off then

I was kicked

I was hurt

I was wounded

I was lied to

I was betrayed

I was abandoned

My suffering was great

but down below in the deeps

in the heart of the ocean

where I was left to lie

I realized my powerlessness

the way my life was lived

helpless and afraid

always being done to

instead of doing

and saw what I did

As realization expanded my

consciousness

fish and sea mammals

grew out of my cut fingers

I became “old food dish”

She who provided for her people

Victim no more**

**From “The Goddess Oracle by Amy Sophia Marashinsky. Image credit also goes to “The Goddess Oracle”.

***

About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is [email protected]

My Name is Isis (Volume 4) on Amazon

Review: Greek Mythology Reading Cards by Allison Chester-Lambert & Illustrations by Richard Crookes

October, 2018

Greek Mythology Reading Cards

by Allison Chester-Lambert

Illustrations by Richard Crookes

112 Cards

I have many, many decks of Tarot and Oracle cards and am always on the look-out for those that will enable the reader to connect in their own style using imagery that resonates with their spiritual practice and philosophies. The Greek Mythology Reading Cards fill those criteria very nicely; offering a visual that most people know a bit about, regardless of religious or spiritual practice.

To clarify, these cards fit in the category of oracle cards, rather than Tarot. I’ve been asked when teaching what the difference is and by way of brief explanation, oracle cards fit nicely into whatever package or presentation that is offered and do not follow a prescribed 78-Keys of Wisdom format. Any deck of Tarot captures multiple layers of hermetic and esoteric inroads and so the traditional 78-card deck is prominent. Now, this is not to say that one is better than the other for divination or receiving guidance and answers. My thought is that any system or format you choose that will open you or the person you are reading for to a receptive state and enable the information to flow is valid.

Greek Mythology is a topic that everyone encounters during the course of their childhood education. The media is filled with movies, music, books and more that make use of the Greek Pantheon and principles to tell their stories and to stimulate the imagination. So, with this oracle deck, you already have a baseline of information about the imagery and the possible meanings of selection. The cards are beautifully illustrated by Richard Crookes and are printed in natural earth tones, the edges strewn with vines and offer the notion that you are looking in on a columned Temple and witnessing a very personal and intimate depiction of whatever theme the card is offering.

The Key Words of interpretation are printed at the bottom of the card, so it is not necessary to refer to the accompanying small booklet unless you wish a more in depth understanding. The Trojan Horse relates to Trickery, Aphrodite to Attraction, Perseus to Gifts and Ares to War Mongering, to name a few. And, if you follow a Hellenic tradition or use this Pantheon for your personal work, the layers of meaning will deepen to reflect the mysteries you’ve already revealed on your path.

All in all, I think this is a beautiful addition for use in readings, meditation and deepening your understanding of a civilization and its work that has laid the foundations for much of modern society.

 

Greek Mythology Reading Cards

***

About the Author:

Robin Fennelly is a Wiccan High Priestess, teacher, poet and author.

She is the author of (click on book titles for more information):

 

The Inner Chamber Volume One

It’s Written in the Stars

Astrology

 

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Two

poetry of the Spheres (Volume 2)

Qabalah

 

The Inner Chamber, Vol. Three

Awakening the Paths

Qabalah

 

A Year With Gaia

The Eternal Cord

 

Temple of the Sun and Moon

Luminous Devotions

 

The Magickal Pen Volume One (Volume 1)

A Collection of Esoteric Writings

 

The Elemental Year

Aligning the Parts of SELF

 

The Enchanted Gate

Musings on the Magick of the Natural World

 

Sleeping with the Goddess

Nights of Devotion

 

A Weekly Reflection

Musings for the Year

 

Her books are available on Amazon or on this website and her Blogs can be found atRobin Fennelly 

 

Follow Robin on Instagram & Facebook.

GoodGod!

October, 2018

Meet the Gods: Chernobog

(“Day and Night (Belobog and Chernobog) by Maxim Sukharev)

Merry meet.

This time of the waning year is the time of the dark gods, who balance the gods of the light during the waxing year.

Slavic god Belobog is the “White God,” with his sunshine that brings life. He is prayed to for a plentiful harvest, and for a light that guides through dark times and places. Belobog appears only during daylight, wearing a white robe and holding a staff. He brings good things to those he meets.

Belobog’s brother is Chernobog, the equally powerful god of the dark who rules the night, and is associated with evil and devastation.

Twice each year the two brothers dueled, with the winner controlling the season along the length of the day and night.

The Black God survives in numerous Slavic curses and in a White God, whose aid is sought to obtain protection or mercy,” Evel Gasparini wrote in “Slavic religion” on britannica.com.

(“Creation of the Earth (Belobog and Chernobog)” by Maxim Sukharev)

Chernobog was associated with bleak attributes such as cold, famine, poverty and illness. Despite this, he is still respected among all the other gods,” Ivan wrote in “12 Gods Of Slavic Mythology And Their Amazing Powers” on ancient-code.com.

In that tradition, the dark was respected, as was the light, knowing it was necessary of cosmic balance, and knowing each year, they would find their way back to the light. These cycles of the universe were due to the polarizing actions of Chernobog and Belobog, Ivan wrote.

Egyptian brothers Set and Horus engage in a similar struggle between light and dark, providing a symbol of harmony. Set, the god of darkness, was associated with evil, deserts, wastelands and the northern stars; although he murdered his brother he was still seen as a protector and a source of strength. He was wild and untamed with bright red hair. Horus was depicted as a winged sun disk. He was the god of the east and of sunrise, and also the god associated with the sunset.

In other cultures, the Greek god of darkness was Erebos while Hodr was the Norse god of winter and darkness. Known for murdering his brother, Set was the Egyptian god of darkness and evil. According to anglefire.com, “Itzcolihuqui was the Atzec demon god of darkness, deep freeze, volcanoes and disaster.”

As the darkness grows, working with these gods can offer strength and power.

Merry part. And merry meet again.

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

She Who Is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

September, 2018

Goddesses Who Protect Travelers

As we begin to look forward to September and the first day of Fall, we remember that, for now, it is still Summer. This means there is still plenty of time to take a vacation and travel.

With that being said, this column looks at three Goddesses who will protect you on your journeys far and wide.

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(Graphic: bonstore.org)

CHAM MO LAM LHA

Cham Mo Lam Lha is the Tibetan Goddess of Travelers. She is a worldly protectress who rode on the back of a bee to insure smooth travel.

She not only will help with outward traveling, but also the travel of an inward spiritual journey

(Graphic: Pinterest)

ABEONA

Abeona is the Roman Goddess of Outward Journeys and Safe Passage. She protects travelers on their departure. She also guides and protects the first steps of children, as well as their first steps away from home.

Abeona’s name means “to depart, or to go forth”. As such, She is also the Goddess of Partings.

(Graphic: religion.wikia.com)

ADEONA/ADIONA

Adiona is the Roman Goddess of Safe Return. She protects

travelers on the arrival back home. She also protects children,

as they leave home and reassure parents that they will return

home, at least to visit.

Her name means “to approach or to visit”.

Abeona and Adiona are both thought to be aspects of Juno due to their special focus on children. These two Goddesses worked together protecting travelers as they departed and made sure that they returned home safely.

May you be blessed on your adventures and travels and may these Goddesses of travel watch over you on your journeys.

Blessings!

***

About the Author:

Susan Morgaine is a Daughter of the Goddess, Witch, Writer, Teacher, Healer, and Yogini. She is a monthly columnist with PaganPages.org Her writings can be found in The Girl God Anthologies, “Whatever Works: Feminists of Faith Speak” and “Jesus, Mohammed and the Goddess”, as well as Mago Publications “She Rises, Volume 2, and “Celebrating Seasons of the Goddess”. She has also been published in Jareeda and SageWoman magazines. She is a Certified Women’s Empowerment Coach/Facilitator through She is the author of “My Name is Isis”, one in the series of the “My Name Is………” children’s books published by The Girl God Publications. A Woman International, founded by Patricia Lynn Reilly. She has long been involved in Goddess Spirituality and Feminism, teaching classes and workshops, including Priestessing Red Tents within MA and RI. She is entering her 20th year teaching Kundalini Yoga and Meditation, being a Certified instructor through the Kundalini Research Institute, as well as being a Reiki Master. She is a member of the Sisterhood of Avalon. She can be found at https://mysticalshores.wordpress.com/ and her email is [email protected]

My Name is Isis

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