SUBSCRIBE

remedies

Book Review – Sacred Herbs: Your Guide to 40 Medicinal Herbs and How to Use Them for Healing and Well-Being by Opal Streisand

May, 2018

Book Review

Sacred Herbs: Your Guide to 40 Medicinal Herbs and How to Use Them for Healing and Well-Being”

by Opal Streisand

Publisher: Sterling Ethos

Published: Hardcover, February 2018

Pages: 128

This book has beautiful, large, color photos of 40 medicinal plants. That is the best thing about “Sacred Herbs: Your Guide to 40 Medicinal Herbs and How to Use Them for Healing and Well-Being.” It makes for a wonderful identification and reference for those in the earlier stages of learning about herbs.

For each, Opal Streisand gives the Latin name, an interesting note, the parts of the plant used, and information about the herb and its benefits, along with cautions if applicable. Sometimes that long paragraph includes history. Sometimes herbs get a four-page spread with more detailed information and a second photo.

Nowhere did I learn Opal Streisand’s credentials, so it would seem she is an author researching and writing about herbs, and not a herbalist sharing learning and personal experience. Someone going deeper into the subject will want an additional book by an herbalist.

This book can serve as the gateway, introducing the reader to some of the most commonly used herbs and instilling an appreciation of their many uses. Ancient healers knew the curative powers of the plants around them. That information has been passed down through generations in many cultures and traditions. Herbs are nature’s medicine, and that medicine is just as effective today as it was 200 years ago.

This book will acquaint you to herbs that soothe and heal. You’ll learn that a decoction of burdock was a folk remedy for colds and valerian is a sleep aid that should not be taken with other sedatives or antidepressants.

It’s worth repeating: the photographs are beautiful. They will help to identify plants by their flowers and, in some cases, their foliage.

Click Image for Amazon Information

***

About the Author:

Lynn Woike was 50 – divorced and living on her own for the first time – before she consciously began practicing as a self taught solitary witch. She draws on an eclectic mix of old ways she has studied – from her Sicilian and Germanic heritage to Zen and astrology, the fae, Buddhism, Celtic, the Kabbalah, Norse and Native American – pulling from each as she is guided. She practices yoga, reads Tarot and uses Reiki. From the time she was little, she has loved stories, making her job as the editor of two monthly newspapers seem less than the work it is because of the stories she gets to tell. She lives with her large white cat, Pyewacket, in central Connecticut. You can follow her boards on Pinterest, and write to her at woikelynn at gmail dot com.

 

 

8 Effective Natural Remedies to Prevent a Cold

December, 2016

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

cold1

BY

 

If you want to prevent a cold, you’re certainly not alone. Colds slow us down and make it so much harder to enjoy life. The key to feeling better is learning the best cold prevention methods and then using them to safeguard your good health. Today, we’re going to let you know the ins and outs of effective cold prevention.

We’ll share lots of practical tips which will help you to protect yourself from germs. Our comprehensive guide will include cold prevention for all ages, as well as a cold prevention remedies list and some advice on how to avoid colds, to begin with. We’ve put together a really detailed guide which is ideal for anyone who wants to explore preventative tips that work well for many users. We believe in natural remedies for preventing colds, and we are committed to offering tips that really work. First, let’s share some information about the common cold. It’s been plaguing mankind forever, and it is definitely something that most people dread.

WiseWoman Traditions

February, 2012

Here Comes the Flu Season

Protect Yourself the Wise Woman Way

Along with the beauty of fall days comes the need to get ready for winter. Time to get out my long underwear and my warm wooly socks. Time to nourish my immune system so cold days won’t be days of colds – and flu.

I don’t rely on modern medicine to keep me healthy, but if you usually rely on a flu shot to protect you, you may feel frightened by your inability to get one this year. You may be wondering what you can do instead. Or you may have discovered that flu shots don’t give protection from all types of flu, just the ones the makers guess will be active this winter. And you may wonder if there isn’t some other way to prevent the flu. Or maybe, like me, you prefer not to use shots or drugs unless absolutely necessary. You may wonder what herbs and remedies are the best to have on hand to help your family deal with the flu.

No matter what your situation, now is a good time to give yourself the benefit of Wise Woman Ways to prevent – and deal with – the flu. These flu preventers and flu remedies are simple. They are quite safe. And you don’t have to be rich to use them. Wise Woman herbal medicine is people’s medicine. Mama Medicine. You can buy most of the things I discuss in this article – and you can find them growing freely, too. You can buy the herbal preparations I mention already made – and you can easily make you own for pennies, too.

These Wise Woman Ways are supported by both tradition and science. Wise women through the centuries have kept themselves and their families safe from contagious diseases. And science has found good reasons for their effectiveness. I hope these tips will help you face winter’s ills with confidence and good health.

Beat the Flu

The best way to prevent the flu is to build a powerful immune system. While this can’t guarantee that you won’t get the flu, neither can the flu shot. Here are my favorite ways to keep my immune system strong:

{   Eat more garlic.

{   Drink nourishing herbal infusions daily.

{   Make immune-strengthening soups; or add immune-strengthening herbs to canned soup.

{   Use anti-viral herbs as needed.

Eat More Garlic

One of the best immune-system helpers is garlic. Dr. James Duke says it contains at least 17 different factors that nourish and support powerful immune system functioning. herbalists in the middle ages relied on it to prevent infection from the plague, so it might keep us safe from the flu. Garlic is anti-bacterial, too. If you don’t like fresh raw garlic, powdered garlic is just as good. The dose is 1 or more cloves of raw garlic per day, or up to a teaspoon of garlic powder. Here are a few of my favorite ways to eat raw garlic:

{   Top scrambled eggs with minced raw garlic.

{   Put chopped raw garlic on pasta and cover with tomato sauce.

{   Try minced raw garlic on a piece of hot buttered toast. Delicious!

{   Add minced raw garlic to your baked potato.

{   Mix chopped raw garlic and olive oil with hot cooked greens like kale or spinach.

Drink Nourishing herbal Infusions

Nourishing herbal infusions are the basis of great nourishment for the immune system and the entire body. They are full of antioxidant vitamins, minerals, proteins, phytoestrogens, and hundreds of protective phytochemicals that work to help you ward off the flu and colds too. Here’s how I make a nourishing herbal infusion:

{   Choose one herb: nettle, oatstraw, red clover, comfrey leaf, linden flowers, or violet leaf.

{   Place one full ounce, by weight, of any one herb in a quart jar. A canning jar is best.

{   Fill the jar to the top with boiling water.

{   Screw on a tight lid.

{   Let it steep for four hours, or overnight.

{   Strain the liquid out, squeezing the herb.

{   Refrigerate the infusion. It will be good for 24-36 hours.

I drink two to four cups nourishing herbal infusions daily – over ice, heated up with honey and milk, or mixed with other beverages.

Make Immune Strengthening Soups

Cooking herbs and vegetables together for a long time extracts minerals, activates immune-strengthening phytochemicals, and increases the levels of available antioxidants. Raw foods weaken and stress the immune system. To make an immune strengthening soup:

{   Chop at least half an onion per person and sauté in olive oil until translucent.

{   Add at least two cloves of garlic, sliced or chopped, per person and sauté for a minute.

{   Add two or more cups of water or vegetable broth per person.

{   Add one cup per person of chopped seasonal vegetables such as:

carrots, cabbage, celery, corn, burdock, turnips, potatoes, tomatoes, parsnips

(If using canned soup, begin here.)

{  Add one small handful of seaweed per person.

{  Add one ounce fresh, or one-half ounce dried mushrooms – any kind – per person.

{  Add one-quarter ounce dried tonic roots per person.

{  Add generous amounts of antioxidant seasoning herbs and some sea salt.

{  Bring to a boil; simmer for an hour.

{  Turn off fire and let your soup mellow in a cool place overnight.

{  Serve it the next day, heated up, with freshly-baked bread and organic raw milk cheese.

Seaweeds build powerful immunity. Kombu and wakame are excellent in soups. Cut them small; they swell to 5-7 times their dried size when cooked.

All mushrooms strengthen the immune system. Dried shitake are available and inexpensive at Chinese grocery stores. Reishii, maitake, and other medicinal mushrooms are delicious, as are the more common button mushrooms, portabellos, and dried porcinni.

Tonic roots help our livers, lymph, and kidneys work well, protecting us from infection. I often put these tough roots into a jelly bag and drop that into the soup so I can fish it out before serving. I use one or more of these, fresh or dried, depending on what I have available:

{   Siberian ginseng

{   Astragalus

{   Burdock

{   Dandelion

{   Chicory

{   Yellow dock

{   American ginseng

Seasoning herbs from the mint family – rosemary, thyme, oregano, basil, marjoram, and sage are loaded with antioxidants. I don’t just season the soup with them; I add them by the handful for the greatest impact on my immune strength.

Anti-Viral Herbs

Anti-infective herbs can help us prevent the flu – and assist us if we do get sick. Colds and the flu are caused by viruses, making them more difficult to treat than bacterial infections. Viruses are more vital than bacteria and harder to kill. There are many anti-bacterial herbs – including yarrow, echinacea, elecampane, and poke – but few that are anti-viral. Of these, my favorite is St. Joan’s/John’s wort. If any herb can prevent the flu, St.J’s can.

Of course, even flu shots don’t prevent all types of flu, and they don’t prevent colds, so even if you do get a shot, it’s a good idea to have some anti-viral and anti-bacterial herbs on hand. The distinction between them is not so important once you are sick. Both types of herbs will alert the immune system to the infection and help it gather the resources needed to counter it. Did you know that the achy muscles and headachy feeling we get with the flu is not caused by the flu itself but results from the immune system gobbling up all available resources so it can clobber the flu virus?

St. Joan’s/John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)

This beautiful yellow flower yields a blood-red tincture that I take by the dropperful to prevent viral infections such as the flu. A dropperful in the morning throughout the cold months is adequate for prevention. I increase that to 2-3 dropperfuls a day if I have been exposed at home or at work to the flu. If I do get sick, I will use other herbs to counter the infection. Capsules of St. J’s are ineffective; I only use the tincture.

Echinacea (Echinacea augustifolia)

The tincture of echinacea root is a well-known anti-infective. When I feel an infection brewing, I use large doses of echinacea to build white blood cells and encourage T-helper cells. The dose of echinacea root tincture is 1 drop for every 2 pounds of body weight, as frequently as every hour or two in the acute phase of an infection, 2-4 times a day otherwise. I have seen echinacea relieve terrible flu infections.

Important: I do not use echinacea as a preventative; it doesn’t seem to work that way. I do not use any part of this plant except the root. I do not combine it with goldenseal, which I believe hinders the immune system. I do not take echinacea in capsules.

I make a quart of echinacea tincture each fall as my winter insurance. Here’s how I do it: Put 4 ounces of dried Echinacea augustifolia root in a quart jar. Fill to the top with 100 proof vodka. Cap tightly and label. Shake daily for the first week then weekly for at least eight weeks.

Poke (Phytolacca americana)

The tincture of this root is so powerful some authors consider it poisonous. You may have a hard time finding it for sale. But poke is an important helper when flu “bugs” have taken over. I would not take poke as a preventative; it is far too strong. I use poke root tincture to kick my immune system into high gear. The dose is one drop – yes, only one drop – once or twice a day for no more than a month, although in serious cases I may use up to 8 doses a day. Poke root tincture can harm the kidneys if it is taken continuously. I never take capsules of poke root.

Elecampane (Inula helenium)

The tincture of this root is a favorite for clearing lung infections and countering the flu. The usual dose is 10-15 drops 2-3 times a day, but I would increase the dose to 6 times a day in an acute situation. I expect to see results within a day or less. I would only take elecampane if I had an active infection; it has little protective value. I never use elecampane capsules.

Elder (Sambucus canadensis)

Elder flowers are a nice remedy for those with a feverish cold, but for those with the flu, I prefer elder berries. The most common way to take them is in the form of a syrup. The immune enhancing properties of elder berries are renowned in Europe and slowly gaining popularity in the United States. Elder berry syrup also eases coughs and lung congestion.

Winter is Coming

Herbs may not seem strong enough to prevent or counter the flu, but they are. When we use herbs to maintain and regain health, we not only take a big step toward health independence but a small step toward peace on our planet. Instead of making war on weeds, I use them. Instead of making war on nature, I let Her guide me. Instead of making war on myself when I’m sick, I nourish myself toward greater health, greater peace.

Green blessings surround us. Herbs not only protect us from the flu, they can uplift our hearts and bring us joy in trying and uncertain times.

Tips to Avoid the Flu

1.     Wash your hands; this is the single best way to avoid the flu.

  1. Cough or sneeze into your elbow, not your hand. Viral particles are easily passed from hands to eyes and nose even if you use a tissue.
  2. If the flu is active in your area, avoid public places.

WiseWoman Traditions

June, 2011

Wild as a Rose

by ÓSusun S. Weed













June is the month for brides. And roses are the flowers of love. So I think it fitting to focus on roses this month. Don’t you? Not only are roses beautiful, they are good medicine and fine food.

Yes, all roses that haven’t been sprayed with poisons (more about that later) can be eaten, whether cultivated or wild, climbing or bushy, white, pink, yellow, or red. My favorite June breakfast is whole wheat toast with butter or cultured cream cheese and a double layer of fresh rose petals. That sure wakes me up! It’s a nice change, too, from my spring fancy breakfast, which is whole wheat toast with butter and violet flowers.

Roses capture our imagination like few flowers, and that’s saying a lot, as any flower can trigger a wonderfully imaginative burst from even the least poetic of us. “How sweet to seize the blushing Prey, And snatch it from the Thorn away!” said Anacreon in the fifth century BCE (translated by Addison, 1735). In mythology, Flora, the goddess of flowers, asks the gods to help her revive a beloved, now dead, nymph. Apollo gives her the breath of life; Bacchus washes her in nectar; Vertummus gives her a lovely scent; Pomona makes her fruitful; and Flora herself gives her a crown of shimmering petals. Thus Rose, the “queen of flowers”, is created.

Roses are painted on fine china, splashed across wallpaper, fashioned out of satin and silk and sewn onto clothes and hats, even dipped in gold and silver. Roses are the very image of innocence; roses are filled with sexual allure. Roses are chaste and pure; roses are wanton and wild. Roses bloom and fade in a day, like love, perfect but passing. Roses endure, blooming year after year, like love, eternal.

Rose gardens are found all over the world. Notable rose gardens include the Brooklyn Botanic Garden in New York, Kew Gardens in England, Westbroekpark in the Netherlands (with 20,000 plants), the Parc de la Grange in Geneva (with 12,000 plants), and the gardens of the Italian Rose Society in Milan. The largest garden in the world devoted entirely to roses is in Shreveport, Louisiana, where more than 70,000 plants are collected into 40 different rose gardens.

There are at least two cities that claim to be “The City of Roses”. One is Portland, Oregon, where the 10,000 roses of the International Rose Test Gardens are terraced on five acres of hillside in the shadow of Mt. Hood. The other is Chandigarh, the capital of the Punjab in India, where 60,000 plants make up the 30-acre Zakir Rose Garden, including a Museum of Roses, a Moonlight Garden of pure white roses, and a scent garden where roses are bred to be especially high in rose oil, the mostly costly fragrance made.

Roses are not especially easy to grow, for they are attractive to a number of insect and fungal pests. Sprays can keep pests at bay, but even organic pesticides and fungicides can be unwholesome if eaten. Instead, I use a strong brew of horsetail (Equisetum arvense) – one cup of dried herb brewed for four hours in a quart of boiling water – diluted, a cup at a time in a gallon of rain water, to spray against black spot and other molds. Seeding lawn areas with milky spore is the best control for Japanese beetles, which can eat through a rose bush in minutes it seems.

If you enjoy an abundance of roses, as I do – through no effort on my part, I assure you, for the wild roses are rampant in my area – you may wish to make rose beads. Natural Rose Beads are sweetly-scented black lumps made by throwing wilted roses into a cast iron pot and allowing them to rot for several months. Before the rose paste dries out, gather it into balls by rolling between your palms, then thread carefully onto a thick string and hang to dry completely. Rose beads will last for decades if thoroughly fermented and carefully dried.

Wild roses have five petals, each gently notched in the center and arranged in a pretty, open star with a cluster of stamen (the pollen-producing parts) in the center. Cultivated roses have petals in multiples of five. The five-pointed star is a pentagram, or pentacle, which is, of course, the symbol of magic. The rose, a blooming pentacle, is as magical as a flower can be.

Eating the petals of roses will get you lots of healthy flavonoids and vitamin C, as well as coloring materials that contain polyphenols and other heart-healthy, cancer-fighting compounds. If you eat the whole rose, you’ll also get allergy-busting pollen to help get your body in tune with your environment.

Besides sprinkling the petals lavishly in salads and across toast, try making Rose Honey*. Fill any jar to the top with roses and rose petals. Pour honey into the jar, stirring as needed to remove air bubbles, until the jar is full. Cap securely and label. Wait for at least a week before eating. The longer you wait, the better the taste. You can make Rose Hip Honey the same way; be sure to remove all the seeds and itchy hairs from the rose hips before putting them in a jar and adding honey.

Rose petal or rose hip honey is splendid on toast, or taken by the spoonful to soothe a sore throat. To forestall a cold, put a tablespoon of rose honey in a cup, add the juice of half a lemon, then fill the cup with hot water.

Roses are especially cherished as a remedy for “women’s problems”. The growing tips of the rose canes are rich in hormone-like substances that help women with menstrual difficulties get into an easy flow, those with libido problems to feel frisky, and those who want to conceive to be more receptive.

Rose Hormone Remedy:

Harvest leaf and flower buds just before they open, preserving with honey, or a mixture of one part glycerin and two parts water. The dose is a teaspoonful several times a day.

Roses are part of a very large family of plants, many of which are medicinal and edible. Raspberry is part of the rose family, and raspberry leaf infusion is a fine uterine tonic. Hawthorn, the heart remedy, is also part of this family. As are most of the non-tropical fruits we enjoy: apples, pears, peaches, and plums, apricots, strawberries, cherries, and blackberries, raspberries, and even almonds.

If an apple a day will keep the doctor away, what will a rose a day do for you? Try it and see!

*Note: Do not give honey to babies under 12 months old.

Blessed Be the Kitchen Witch

March, 2009

Thank you for welcoming me back into the Pagan Pages family. It is good to be home.

Knowing if you are pagan is relatively simple, but choosing your path is a little more complex. There are hundreds of pagan paths that a practitioner can follow. Before you choose your path research them. Follow your heart when you make your final decision.

The title of this column is Blessed Be the Kitchen Witch. I am a kitchen witch but I am so also much more. I have brought many more practices into my craft, hearth witchery, cottage witchery, green witchery and garden witchery. I am an earth based witch and all of these practices are centered on the hearth and home so to me all fall into Kitchen Witchery. They are what make me the witch I choose to be. This column will have a little bit of all. It’s easy to be a Kitchen Witch if everything at your kitchen works perfectly. Last time I had some problems with plumbing, all I needed to do was to visit MarinesPlumbing.com and call this contractor. They are real magicians, I should say.

All of the spells, advice, and tips in this column are used with harm to none. Please follow the Wiccan Rede when doing any of the workings found here.

The following was found on the internet and I don’t know who the Author is.

The Kitchen Witch’s Creed

In this pot I stir the sun,

an’ follow the rule of harming none.

Banishment of bane when goin’ windershins;

an’ with water and salt negativity is cleansed.

Household duties are more than chores,

Magick abounds when mopping the floors.

With this broom, I do sweep,

To clean my house and safety keep.

Marigold, Basil, Thyme, and Yarrow,

My spell is cast for a better tomorrow.

Lemons for joy and apples for health,

The pow’r within brings great wealth.

And in this kitchen I do pray,

To truly walk the Witch’s Way.

The tools of a Kitchen Witch do not necessarily have to be bought. A simple wooden spoon can become a wand. A cup or bowl can become a chalice and vessel. Ordinary kitchen knives can be used for an athame and boline. The kitchen broom becomes a staff. The slow cooker or crock pot or a heavy duty cooking pot can be used as a cauldron. A simple coffee grinder takes place of the mortar and pestle. A Kitchen Witch’s magick comes from within, so be sure to use natural materials. Ie: glass, metal, wood, pottery, and ceramics, the broom should be made of straw.

A Kitchen Witch uses essential oils and incense to create balance. He or she turns everyday mundane life into magicak moments. They will take pride in the meals they prepare, and the recipes they create. There are many spells involving a broom and mop. They use these items to cleanse their home which is also their sacred space. He or She will also keep to the rule of harming none as not to jeopardize their magick. Their symbols involve household items such as a cauldron, broom, corn dolls, the triquetra, and a kitchen witch doll. Of course they will use any symbol that is comfortable for them.

A little lore using simple elements from the house.

The refrigerator is the appliance dedicated to air.

Fire dwells within the stove

Water rules over the kitchen sink

All the foods and herbs in the kitchen are ruled by the earth element.

It is thru the use of these basic everyday items from our kitchens that our magick is created.

Even more lore from a Kitchen Witch’s home

Be sure to wash all of your dishes every night is you work with fairy magick. Faries don’t like a dirty kitchen and they won’t let you sleep until you clean it!!

Hang wind chimes in doorways, in front of windows outside, or from a balcony rail to ward off negative energy and keep away intruders.

Sifters and strainers kept in the kitchen are good for protection and will keep the kitchen safe.

If you have a bunch of accidents in your kitchen it is time to magikcally cleanse it.

Sew herbs or magickal powders into the lining of your drapes. Place packets of herbs or magickal powders under your throw rugs. This helps protect and scent the home at the same time.

Herbs for alternate healing


NOTE: Before using any of these remedies please check with your doctor. Some may be bad for your health if you have an existing condition that will interact with the herbs.

Arthritis: Comfrey

Flu: cayenne pepper

Gout: comfrey.  Gout is also in the arthritis family

Headaches: rosemary

Insect Stings: Marigold

Nightmares: chamomile, rosemary

I will have more for you next month.

 

Natural Remedies

Cool whip will condition your hair in 15 min.

Dump Nestea into a bath for sunburn

Use meat tenderizer for bee stings

Puffy eyes? Preparation H….I know it sounds gross but it works…yes I have used it…lol

Use that old time favorite snack jell-o for stinky feet… I know.. now I am really grossing you out, but these really work.

Put Kool-Aid in plain yogurt and let your kids use it for finger paints. Your kids will love it and it won’t hurt them if they eat it.

Use Pam cooking spray for a sticking bike chain

Pam will also remove paint and grease from your hands

Peanut butter will take the ink off the face of dolls

Stay tuned for more

March brings us our Spring Equinox. It is also the sabbat of Ostara. Ostara is celebrated on this equinox. It is also known as Lady Day. Ostara is named after the Goddess Eostre. While modern day Wiccans equate Ostara with the spring equinox, the original Ostara was a lunar holiday celebrated on the 1st full moon following the equinox. The significance of Ostara is the beginning of spring and the renewal and rebirth of nature herself.

The full moon for March is called the Chaste Moon. March is the month when spring is upon us. With spring comes the rebirth of plants and animals. Now is the time for new beginnings, new projects, and planting your flowers and new herbs.

I live in an apartment complex so I don’t have flower beds (the BIG downfall of apartment buildings) I do however have a balcony. Since this is the 1st spring I have been here I am going to try my hand at balcony gardening. I will get planters for the railing and plant some of my favorite flowers and a herb garden. I can’t wait. This month’s gardening will be geared towards the apartment dwellers.

For those of you who have a sunny kitchen window (I don’t) the windowsill full of potted plants and herbs not only looks good, but they release magickal energies into the room. Plant some common herbs that are used in your kitchen. Of course plant some of the herbs you like so you can have their energies too.
This month’s craft

Doorway Protection for those living in an apartment

Items Needed:

1 purple candle   glue gun and glue sticks  wire cutters

¼ yard ½ “ lace, gathered and color of choice

2 yds ¼ “ satin ribbon in your color of choice

4 yds ½ “ satin ribbon in a contrasting color

10 small silk rose buds ( found at Hobby Lobby or Michaels)

Gather these items into your sacred space. Light the purple candle. Before making this protective charm, sit and clear your mind and think of how you want this charm to protect your home. When you are ready begin.

1. Take the broom and “very carefully” pass it thru the flame of the candle, the fire will help infuse your charm with your energy. Do this for each item.
2. With the ¼ “ ribbon tie a double bow and glue to the top of the handle. Cut the wire stems off 2 of the silk rosebuds. Glue these to the center of the bow.
3. Take the ½ “ ribbon and tie it into a triple bow. Glue this to the base of the handle. Cut the wire stems off 4 of the rosebuds. Glue them to the center of the bow.
4. Glue the gathered lace along the bottom edge of the bristles(about 1” from the bottom) Cut the stems off the remaining rosebuds and glue them evenly spaced across the lace.
5. Hold your finished broom in your hands as you visualize its intent.

The following incantation is recommended but now necessary. I know it doesn’t rhyme but I haven’t yet mastered that.

Wrapped in ribbon and lace

This broom is enchanted.

Cleansed in fire, now may my wish be granted.

Magic broom of mine protect from harm,

Ward off negativity

Blessed be.

Hang the broom bristles up over your door.

Allow the candle to burn for a bit then extinguish. Put the candle away and use the next time you work any protection for your apartment.

As I told everyone in June 06, I had a “kitchen witch doll” that hang in 7 different kitchen’s and had made it thru all the moves. Well I had to give her a decent send off as she didn’t make it thru my last move intact. Next month’s craft will be the making of a Kitchen Witch Doll.

In closing: Everyone has their own magickal or sacred place. Mine is my home. I feel the magick of my home as well as work my own magick. For some this is their magickal place too. Whatever your place, make it your own. Decorate it to your taste. For those who’s space is outside, enhance your place by adding nice chairs and pots of flowers that you feel drawn too. This place too can be made your very own. Whether inside or out, have fun making your space. Let it take on your personality as well as keeping its own.

Remember: Magick happens all around us.

See you next month