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the dagda

Book Review – Pagan Portals: The Dagda by Morgan Daimler

April, 2019

Book Review
Pagan Portals
The Dagda
Meeting the Good God of Ireland
by Morgan Daimler

The
Dagda, the Good God of Ireland, is the subject of the book written by
Morgan Daimler. She has created a beginner’s book on a Deity that
is multilayered and complex. As of 2017, the time of the writing of
this book, the author, Ms. Daimler had not heard of a book that was
written solely on the Dagda.

The
author, Ms. Daimler, has broken the five different chapters up into
sub-entries. Each entry deals with a different aspect of the Dagda.
Even though there are only 77 pages in the e-book, I found myself
taking a lot of notes.

The
first chapter describes the Dagda, in name, physical description, and
in his relationship with others. The second chapter is the mythology
of the deity known as the Good God, the Dagda. There are several
different myths that Ms. Daimler uses; most of which have Irish
titles that I can’t pronounce. (My pronunciation of Irish words is
terrible so that my program that does my typing would misspell all of
them anyway.) All of the myths that Ms. Daimler used as references
showed the Dagda, as a God of many skills, abundance, and healing.

In
chapter 3 one of the possessions that belong to the Dagda, is a
cauldron of abundance. In modern neopaganism, the cauldron is often
associated with feminine or goddess energy. In Irish were more
generally Celtic mythology the cauldron is associated with Gods.

Also
in chapter 3, she talks about herbs, trees, and resins. She does
point out that herbs are a bit more modern and vary from person to
person. Oak has always had a strong connection with the Dagda. Also
having an association with the Dagda are frankincense and myrrh,
neither of which are native to Ireland.

On
page 51 of Ms. Daimler’s book she talks about the Dagda has a
strong modern reputation as a Druid or working druidic magic, but she
points out that there is nothing explicit in the mythology the
connecting to the Druids. She does think it’s redundant that the
Dagda has his own Druid. She says it’s redundant, if he, himself
was also a Druid. I don’t think it’s any more redundant, then a
tarot reader going to another tarot reader for a reading.

There
are a couple of different things that Ms. Daimler includes in the
book that I find interesting. One of the sub-entries is the Dagda in
my life; I like when an author includes their working with a Deity or
part of their own spiritual growth experience. She also includes a
look at the Dagda in the modern world.

I
do see this book as a jumping off book for learning more about the
Dagda. I think some of the sources that Ms. Daimler quotes, will lead
others to search more about Celtic myth. I’m glad to have read this
book because it gave me a deeper understanding of the Dagda, and the
way Irish/Celtic myths look at their deities. I highly recommend this
book.

Pagan Portals – the Dagda: Meeting the Good God of Ireland on Amazon

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About
the Author:

Dawn Borries loves reading and was thrilled to become a Reviewer for PaganPages.Org. Dawn, also, has been doing Tarot and Numerology readings for the past 25 years. Dawn does readings on her Facebook page. If you are interested in a reading you can reach her on Facebook @eagleandunicorn.