• Crafting Articles

    In The Kitchen With Skarlett

    Apple Cider Donut Cake     Apples are one of the sacred foods of Samhain. In Celtic tradition, apples were buried at Samhain to feed the dead as well as used in various forms of divination. Apples are good for faerie protection, abundance, protection, long life, health and creativity. Butter is there to bind things together and to ease transitions. Cake mix for happiness. Eggs for fertility and beauty. Sugar for attraction, love and romance.     Now to the apple pie spice: Allspice for money drawing and good fortune. Cinnamon for protection, wealth and passion. Cloves for abundance, lust, protection and courage. Ginger for protection, power and prosperity. Nutmeg…

  • Crafting Articles

    WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

    Drink Up Witches   Merry meet! While Sahmain is a solemn sabbat, the new year starts at midnight. For this witchcraft, mix up a cocktail or two to celebrate. These are just a sampling of recipes that can be found online.   Going Off the Deep End Daiquiri     1½ ounce rum 3 ounce blueberry juice 1 ounce pineapple juice 1 squeeze fresh lemon Put all ingredients in a shaker, shake well and serve over ice. Garnish with a slice of fresh orange or lemon. (Recipe by by Isie) Witches Brew Cocktail   1 oz vodka 1.5 oz raspberry liqueur 1 oz lime juice, strained 1 drop purple food…

  • Crafting Articles

    In the Kitchen with Skarlett

    Slow Cooker Chili for Mabon   With Mabon upons us, thoughts turn to goat’s horn bearing fruit, grain and other harvesty goodness. No..I did not eat the funny mushrooms. I am referring to the Cornucopia also called the horn of plenty. It is a symbol of abundance and good fortune. It is commonly pictured as a large horn-shaped basket overflowing with the fruits of the harvest such as grains, fruits, vegetables and nuts. Small wonder it is adorning American tables at Thanksgiving and various other harvest related celebrations. A possible origin for the cornucopia was in ancient Greece. When Zeus was a baby, his mother hid him away from Cronus…

  • Crafting Articles

    WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

    Apples Three Ways Merry meet! Apples correspond to Mabon and there are many simple ways to incorporate them into your craft when celebrating Mabon.   I like to use them as candle holders on my altar and table. For tea lights, take an empty candle container and push it into the top of an apple. Scoop out the area and drop in a tea light.           Similarly, core the top of an apple to hold a taper candle, careful that the apple remains stable.       When done using them as candle holders, you can slice the apples horizontally into thin circles, dip them in…

  • Crafting Articles

    WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

    Herb Wreath   Merry meet! This issue’s WitchCrafting column offers an idea for a Lughnasadh project. By the first harvest festival, most herbs are abundant. Gathering them to make a wreath is one way to preserve them, letting them dry to decorate your kitchen and flavor your food. For this project, I bought a round wire form at the Dollar Tree, and used florist tape and green plant twist ties I already had. Sage, mint, chives, and oregano were harvested from my sister’s garden. Because it’s still May in New England, I purchased additional herbs from the grocery store: rosemary, thyme, and dill. Use the botanicals available to you, giving…

  • Crafting Articles

    The Kitchen Witch

    “Doctored-Up” Pizza Whenever my mother was in a hurry and wanted to cut corners in the kitchen, instead of making her own marinara (for instance), she would open a couple jars of Ragu and add a can of crushed tomatoes, chopped onions, mushrooms, herbs and spices, red wine, homemade meatballs or cooked Italian sausage. By the time it was ready for the table, you never knew that this sauce had started out as an ordinary jar of Ragu. My mother called this “doctoring up” the sauce. She did this to all kinds of store-bought items. She was Sandra Lee long before Food Network. I think this is definitely a kind…

  • Crafting Articles

    WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

    Shell Wind Chime   Merry meet!   This issue’s WitchCrafting column is connected to a favorite summer activity: collecting shells at the beach. I have a difficult time not filling my pockets with these marine mollusks. Holding them, I can feel the energy of earth, water, fire, and air.  Litha is a special time for capturing the essence of summer, in this case with a wind chime. I used shells that had naturally occurring holes, but instructional videos can be found for drilling them. Thin wire, dental floss, cotton twine, and other fibers can all be used to tie the shells into strips. Arrange them any way that pleases you.…

  • Crafting Articles

    WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

    Crafts for Witches: Fire Starters Merry meet. Beltane is one of the fire festivals. The word Beltane translates roughly to “bright fire” and in Celtic tradition, the most important ritual was the sacred community bonfire lit at sunset the evening before. (Celtic days went from sundown to sundown.) Festivities focused on casting off winter’s darkness and celebrating the start of summer. It’s also a time of celebrating fertility You can start your fire with items you likely already have on hand. Perhaps the easiest and least expensive fire starters are made by filling cardboard toilet paper tubes with loosely packed dryer lint. Use two or three to start a fire.…

  • Crafting Articles

    WitchCrafting: Crafts for Witches

    Ostara Cards   Merry meet.   I don’t always manage to get Yule cards out on time, but it occurred to me: why send cards only for the winter holidays? Why not for spring? Here is a suggestion for an Ostara card that can be modified for any of the other sabbats. I bought packets of seeds that were magickal and, hopefully, easy to grow – organic and heirloom when possible. Then I wrote a verse for the inside of the card that can serve as a spell, which you are free to use:           “As the wheel turns and we move into the light, May…

  • Crafting Articles

    The Kitchen Witch

    The Humble Boxty Many years ago, I went out with a guy named Tim. We were just kids; I was a little older than he was, but we were still kids, basically. I was twenty and he was eighteen. At that time, the drinking age was eighteen years old in New York State. We went to a lot of concerts and to clubs that featured live music. Tim was a major Deadhead and I loved anything I could dance to. But like so many young people, we drifted apart. I didn’t hear from Tim for many years – not until I reconnected with him on Facebook around 2007 or so.…