• Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Osiris     Osiris was the god of death and the afterlife – one of the Egyptians’ most prominent gods. He judged the souls of the dead to determine who was worthy of reincarnation. He was considered a kind, merciful, and loving judge, bringing comfort and protection, not fear, to the people. Osiris (also know as Usir) was also identified with nature’s cycles, such as the Nile River’s annual flooding, and the growth of crops and other vegetation. In English, the original form of Osiris’ name means Almighty or The Powerful. Osiris is also known as the Lord of Silence, the Lord of Love, and He Who…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Lugh     The Celts, who lived in central Europe, worshipped Lugh (or Lug) as their Sun god. He is one of the most prominent gods from Irish mythology with many skills including fierce warrior, master craftsman, harpist, poet, and king. Fulfilling a prophecy, he grew up to kill his grandfather, Balor, the god of the underworld. Lugh (pronounced Loo) is associated with the festival of Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-NA-sah), which bears his name. It is celebrated as the first harvest – traditionally August 1 – by those who keep the tradition alive. Astrologically, it falls on August 6, 2020.     He is depicted as a tall,…

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    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Dhanvantar     With the country still reeling from a pandemic, demands for racial justice and calls to end police brutality, meet Lord Dhanvantari, the Hindu god of healing. He is one of the greatest deities because he gave people the knowledge of Ayurveda, the traditional Hindu system of medicine. In his four hands, the physician god carries a bowl of amrit (the nectar of immortality), a discus or chakra (a divine weapon to cut away evil), a conch shell (when ground it’s used in some medicines), and herbs. He is dressed in yellow clothes, with a wreath of herbs and flowers around his neck. His eyes…

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    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Babalú–Ayé     Babalú–Ayé, the God of Healing in Santerian practice and Yoruba religion, is an Orisha. God checker.com describes an Orisha as “a spirit cocktail with a slice of saint and a tiny dash of divinity for flavor.” A few – including Babalú–Ayé – were worshiped as gods. Babalú-Ayé translates to “Father, Lord of the Earth.” What began with a single tribe in Nigeria spread to many tribes all along Africa’s western coast. He is closely associated with infectious diseases, and healing the physical body, wealth and possessions. In West Africa, smallpox, Ebola, leprosy, influenza and HIV/AIDS epidemics are affiliated with him. He works to combat…

  • Monthly Columns

    Peeking in the Shadows: Crafting a Book of Shadows and Light

    This month I want to offer something a little different. We have had stressful and draining experience since the beginning of the COVI-D-19 Pandemic. I would like us to stand in the light of the Summer Solstice; anticipating this longest day and the hope that this light will bring. This is a writing that I return to again and again as I call to the Sun’s brilliance and the hope that it brings. Perhaps this is something you would like to add to your BOS. Rework, rephrase, rewrite it in any way that speaks to you. (Photo by Adrian Pelletier on Unsplash) Mother’s Flowering- The Summer Solstice The night is…

  • Monthly Columns

    Peeking in the Shadows: Crafting a Book of Shadows and Light Second Edition

    Last month I shared some documents with you to consider adding to your BOS. This month I want to share some brainstorming prompts to use as you fill more of your BOS pages. On first glance this month’s article may appear less robust than most but I assure you that if you work with each of the questions in a thoughtful and authentic way, you will have more than enough to keep you occupied. So, let’s get started. Some of these will become checklists for crafting your own rituals. Others are in the moment wanderings and others are for the intention of having a strong foundation to grow upon. Be…

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    Gael Song Second Edition

    The Hidden Gem of Solitude   With most folks staying at home during this pandemic, I thought an article about solitude might be helpful. I’ve lived a contemplative life for twenty years now, mostly by myself, writing, meditating, in complete silence 90% of every day. Besides three mornings of volunteer work a week, my life is very, very quiet. When my last daughter went off to college twenty years ago, I chafed against the isolation but within a very few months, I began to cherish it and still do. What I discovered fairly quickly is that silence opens the doorway to the Otherworld. In general, beings on the other side…

  • Monthly Columns

    Peeking in the Shadows: Crafting a Book of Shadows and Light

    Starting Your Book of Shadows: Part Three Some Docs To Get You Going And Some Time In Magickal Contemplation   Last month we discussed and enacted a ritual of dedication for your Book of Shadows. Now you are ready to begin filling it with your goodies. This month I’m going to give you some traditional writings that you may want to include in your BOS. (photo by Angelina Litvin on Unsplash) Begin with your own writing. Spend some time thinking about how you would like your BOS to serve your growth. What “mission” will it serve as part of your journey? Is there a specific Deity that you would like…

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    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Asclepius     Asclepius is the ancient Greek god of medicine, healing, wisdom, rejuvenation and physicians. His name means “to cut open” because his mother, Coronis, died during labor and his father, Apollo, performed the first cesarean section by cutting the child out of her womb. Asclepius married Epione, the goddess of soothing. Their daughters were Panacea (goddess of medicines), Aegle (goddess of good health), Aceso (goddess of the healing process), Iaso (the goddess of recuperation) and Hygieia (the goddess of health, Hygiene). They also had three sons. According to GreekMythology.com, “At some point, Asclepius healed a snake, which in return taught him secret knowledge – snakes…

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    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Papa Legba     Papa Legba is a lao – a spirit in Haitian and Louisiana Voudou – acting as an intermediary between humans and Bondye, the creator god considered to be unknowable to mortals. For that reason, spiritual work is done with the loa much like with angels or saints, however sources indicate they want to be fed and honored before being asked for help. Papa Legba guards the spiritual crossroads. Because he speaks all languages and has the gift of elocution, he can translate human petitions and decide which to deliver to the loa.     He has evolved from his origins in Dahomey, a…