• Crafting Articles

    Oud: The Magickal Benefits of the Middle Eastern Incense

    Known as the “wood of the Gods” and the “black gold”, Oud is one of the most mysterious and precious raw substance used in the majority of Middle-Eastern Homes. From having its incense placed in every corner of our houses, to using its oil on our bodies and its fragrance on our bed sheets, this powerful and magickal scent is part of our culture and of our daily lives. The history of Oud goes back to ancient times, where it was known in civilizations such as the Chinese, Pharaonic and Assyrian before it reached the Arab civilization through the silk road. The earliest recorded information was found in 1400 B.C.E.…

  • Monthly Columns

    Allah: The Stolen God of the Phoenicians

    Allah: The Stolen God of the Phoenicians “Allah”, an Arabic name – feared and loved by some, severally misunderstood by many – spoken by the Jews, Christians, and Muslims of the Middle-East. Though mostly affiliated to those of the Abrahamic religion, the actual word “Allah” is a contraction of “al Ilah”, which literally means The God. While the Muslims believe that the word Allah was spoken and written by God himself in Arabic in the Quran (which is why all Muslims, no matter what nationality they are from, tend to use the name Allah in Arabic since they believe that God spoke Arabic thus the actual word God does not…

  • Crafting Articles,  This Month's Holiday

    Samhain Recipe: Phoenician Wheat Porridge

    Samhain Recipe: Phoenician Wheat Porridge This Phoenician wheat porridge is served in Lebanon on happy occasions, such as to celebrate baby’s first tooth,  when it is distributed to all friends, relatives and neighbors. It was also served for the New Year as wheat symbolizes prosperity and happiness, as well as for Samhain, at which people wear a disguise and go door to door. They are welcomed with a dish of wheat berries in a sweet anise-scented broth covered with a multitude of nuts. This dish was customary in any celebration; in my ancestor’s time, families would send the High Priest or High Priestess two large platters of this dish that…