• Uncategorized

    Sacred Sites

    The Ring of Brodgar – Orkney Islands “We cannot fully live without the treasury our ancestors have left us. Without the story – in which everyone living unborn, and dead participates – men are no more than ‘bits of paper blown on the cold wind” George MacKay Brown, Winter Tales 1995 Once again we journey to the island of Orkney for our final look at one of the most spectacular and well preserved prehistoric monuments in the British Isles, The Ring of Brodgar. This series of standing stones is not just a stone circle and henge but a focus for the other standing stones and many Neolithic and Bronze Age…

  • Uncategorized

    Sacred Sites

    Skara Brae What makes a site sacred? When I started visiting Pagan sacred sites I knew they would be places of great beauty, spiritually, and ancestor worship. Places that would make us feel as though we are a part of something greater than ourselves. My search was for a link between then and now. While in the Orkney Islands, we walked in the footsteps of an ancient people. We saw the places where these people lived and where they buried and honored their dead. What did we have in common, how did they live and survive?  They tell us their stories preserved in stone, evidence of tradition and a link…

  • Uncategorized

    Sacred Sites

    Maeshowe Orkney Islands, Scotland Our Pagan pilgrimage begins with a drive to the northernmost part of Scotland, were we board a ferry that will take us across the North Sea to Orkney. You can imagine stepping back into time as you cross the water to the small set of islands in the north. It’s barren landscape due to the fact that Orkney has been largely treeless for over two thousand years, this feature adds to the striking quality of the land. Orkney has been inhabited for at least 5,500 years, originally by neolithic tribes and then by the Picts. Invaded and settled by the Norse, it is now considered part…