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    Dunloe Ogham Stones – County Kerry, Ireland In beautiful County Kerry, between Beaufort village and the Gap of Dunloe the traveler that visits here will be rewarded, for eight stones inscribed with Ogham have been collected here. Seven of the eight Ogham stones in this group were discovered in Coolmagort in the nineteenth century and have been set up on this site close to Dunloe Castle. These seven stones were originally the roofs of a souterrain or underground passage, which collapsed at the end of the last century, several centuries after they had been carved. Because of their long protection from exposure, the Dunloe inscriptions are unusually well preserved. The…

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    Druids Stone Circle – Kenmare, County Kerry, Ireland Founded in 1670 and cradled in the heart of Kenmare Bay, Kenmare has been titled Kerry’s first Heritage Town. Its breathtaking scenery and unique charm make it a worthwhile stop while in the Killarney area. For the traveler willing to take a longer look, Kenmare abounds with archeological sites. Set among the artisan shops and spectacular views are ancient roots, for this town has one of the largest stone circles in the south-west of Ireland, and it is also the only monument of it’s kind to be situated so close to a town. The pamphlet we obtained from the Kenmare Stone Circle…

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    The Burren, Co Clare, Ireland The word Burren derives its name from Boireann, which means ‘rocky land’ in Gaelic. This region of naturally interlocking limestone slabs was formed 320 million years ago and it contains a wealth of rare flowers growing in a unique botanical environment in which Mediterranean and alpine plants rare to Ireland growing side by side. Glaciation and wind and rain erosion have formed limestone pavements with deep crevices known as ‘grykes’.  The porous rock is easily penetrated by rainwater, which has gouged out an extensive cave system beneath the rocky plateau. The geology and archaeology of The Burren make it place of great mystery and beauty,…

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    Beltane Celebration – Tullamore – County Offaly – Ireland We are back from our travels in Ireland and we hope you had as exciting a Beltane celebration as we did.  I’d like to share with you some of the highlights of our Journey. Surrounded by a 700 year old Oak forest (the oldest in Ireland) stands Charleville Castle, known for generations as one of the world’s most haunted castles. Legend states that Charleville was built on the site of an ancient Druid burial ground and it is said that Druids conducted ceremonies on this site. The 500-year-old Oak tree that hoards the entrance to Charleville We had traveled here to…

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    Sacred Sites

    Beltane in Ireland For this issue of Sacred Sites we begin by wishing you a Happy Beltane! This month we are in Ireland with a group of travelers exploring sacred sites. We hope you’ll journey with us in spirit as we make our way across the mystical emerald isle. This will be an interesting opportunity to experience the difference in celebratory styles, not only culturally speaking, but from within the Irish community itself. We will meet a transplanted American living in County Kerry, a solitary Witch, in the heart of Ireland and a member of Teampall Na Callaighe that lives in Kells. In the upcoming issues of Pagan Pages we…

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    The Caledonian Forest – Scotland This month for Sacred Sites I’d like to appeal to those of you who might consider taking a different kind of trip, one certainly not found in any guidebook. What I propose might not be for everyone, and I will warn you, there are no amusement park rides, no sandy beaches, and no wait staff serving you drinks with little umbrellas in them. This destination is about uniting conservation, communities and sustainable travel. It’s called eco-tourism and it might just be one of the best things you could ever do. Here is a little story for you… Once upon a time… The ancient Caledonian forest…

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    Sacred Sites

    Beltane in Ireland For this issue of Sacred Sites we begin by wishing you a Happy Beltane! This month we are in Ireland with a group of travelers exploring sacred sites. We hope you’ll journey with us in spirit as we make our way across the mystical emerald isle. This will be an interesting opportunity to experience the difference in celebratory styles, not only culturally speaking, but from within the Irish community itself. We will meet a transplanted American living in County Kerry, a solitary Witch, in the heart of Ireland and a member of Teampall Na Callaighe that lives in Kells. In the upcoming issues of Pagan Pages we…

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    Sacred Sites

    Hill of Tara – County Meath, Ireland The Hill of Tara was the Coronation place of Ireland’s kings, and is one of Ireland’s most famous sites. An ancient seat of power, more than 140 kings are said to have reigned there. It was the sacred place of dwelling for the gods, and was the entrance to the Otherworld. This was where Ireland stood its ground and ruled for hundreds of years, and where today it remains a spiritual center for those in Ireland, with pilgrimages taking place on special Pagan and Christian holidays. The Hill of Tara known as Teamhair Na Rí, “Hill of the Kings” forms an archaeological complex…

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    Knowth, County Meath, Ireland – Passage Portal Tomb This month we travel to Knowth, a Neolithic passage tomb that is part of the Brú na Bóinne complex in County Meath, Ireland. While Newgrange is by far the most famous of the three Boyne Valley passage-tombs (Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth), it is probably Knowths astonishing quantity of art, which makes it more impressive than Newgrange. Knowth contains one quarter of all known megalithic art in Europe and is by far the most significant find in terms of art, scale and history. Surrounded by 17-18 satellite mounds, Knowth, also known as the Great Mound, is itself decorated with 127 Kerbstones. Interestingly, some…

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    Sacred Sites – Brigid’s Well – Liscannor, Ireland Symbolically, water is seen as a portal to the Otherworld and as a source of wisdom and healing. So, it’s not surprising that Ireland is home to nearly three thousand holy wells. Of these, at least fifteen (many undocumented) are dedicated to the Goddess Brigid. Known by many names of various spellings, she is the daughter of Dagda the great ‘father-god’ of Ireland and many believe she is one and the same with Danu, the first great mother of Ireland. Located in Liscannor on the western coast of County Clare, Brigid’s Well is one of the many stops on a pilgrimage path…