• Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – Pagan Magic of the Northern Tradition: Customs, Rites and Ceremonies by Nigel Pennick

    Book Review Pagan Magic of the Northern Tradition Customs, Rites and Ceremonies by Nigel Pennick Publisher: Destiny Books 352 Pages Publication Date: 5/21/2015     Like many of Nigel Pennick’s books, Pagan Magic of the Northern Traditions, is a scholarly survey of the cultural uses of magic in the everyday world of pre-Christian Northern Europe. It is not a “how-to” book. It’s better than a how-to book; Pennick explores the practices and customs that underlay our understanding of telling time, the powers and associations of the days of the week, the seasons and the year, household magic and protection, colors, planetary magic, and the power of sigils and objects, among…

  • Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – Elemental Magic: Traditional Practices for Working With The Energies Of The Natural World, 3rd Edition by Nigel Pennick

    Book Review Elemental Magic Traditional Practices for Working With The Energies Of The Natural World 3rd Edition by Nigel Pennick 144 Pages     Elemental Magic: Traditional Practices for Working With The Energies Of The Natural World by Nigel Pennick is a classic text of introduction to and practical application of nature in magical practice. Mr. Pennick’s books can be found in the libraries of both the scholars and those who follow the ways of the pagan path and he is an expert in the details of European folk magic. This is the 3rd Edition of a timeless book that provides a comprehensive and thorough teaching of the expression of…

  • Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – Magic in the Landscape: Earth Mysteries and Geomancy by Nigel Pennick

    Book Review Magic in the Landscape Earth Mysteries and Geomancy by Nigel Pennick 176 Pages     Nigel Pennick’s new book, Magic in the Landscape – Earth Mysteries and Geomancy, opens with a lament for the loss of a cultural sense of humans’ place in the natural world. We spend most of our time physically separate from the natural world, in artificial environments, oblivious to what we cannot see on our screens. The worldview of “developed” cultures is that we live in a “world of dead matter, there to be used and used up.” And, as Pennick emphasizes, we have rejected not only the natural world, but the ways in…