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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 11

    Metaphors Our lessons have been geared toward putting our thoughts into a poetry form. Most of the writing has been straight forward about the topic. This month will be more of a challenge; I would like for us to explore metaphors. Quick review: ~Similies are comparisons of unlike concepts using like/as. I was as hungry as a lion. ~Metaphors are comparisons of unlike concepts without using like/as. I was a lion ripping through the kitchen hunting for something to eat. Similes are ultimately easier than metaphors because the comparison is more direct; you are able to clearly state the two things you are comparing, and why you are comparing them,…

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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 10

    Haiku The Haiku is a traditional Japanese form of writing poetry. It consists of three lines. The lines do not have to rhyme, but the should (some would say must) follow a strict meter for 5-7-5. The haiku that is use to typically used to teach haiku is as follows: I am first with five Then seven in the middle Five again to end. I/am/first/with/five Then/se/ven/in/the/mid/dle Five/a/gain/to/end Haikus tend to be nature driven, making two observations followed by a comment. Full/maj/est/y/shines deep/est/of/nights/em/brac/es Dark/and/light/co/lide Your assignment: Construct one haiku, using 5-7-5 meter.

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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 9

    Lesson 9: Villanelle The villanelle is more complicated than the limerick because it not only has a set rhyme scheme but also repeats lines throughout the poem and must be done in such a way to make sense. The rhyme scheme in a villanelle is ABA ABA ABA ABA ABAA. The first and third lines of the first stanza are the repeating lines. The first line is the last line in stanza two and four. The third line is the last line in stanza three. Both lines are used in stanza five to close out the poem. I personally find it easiest to really focus on your topic, and free-write…

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    Spellwork through Poetry, Lesson 7

    Limerick The limerick is a five line poem that has a very distinctive rhythm. It follows a rhyme scheme: AABBA, with the first, second, and fifth rhyming lines being longer than the third and fourth. Limericks are often humorous (and the best ones are dirty). This one, from Wikipedia, is an excellent example: The limerick packs laughs anatomical In space that is quite economical, But the good ones I’ve seen So seldom are clean, And the clean ones so seldom are comical Using limericks in spellcasting can be very fun. In my personal experience, the topic of which I was casting was never serious, an in I need this to…

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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 7

    Sonnets Last month, we wrote rhyming couplets and quatrains. We will be building off of that skill this month as we explore sonnets. There are two types of sonnets, the Elizabethan Sonnet and the Italian Sonnet. They have different rhyme schemes and different numbers of lines. The sonnet is written in iambic pentameter, but we will not concern ourselves with something that technical. The first sonnet we will tackle is the Elizabethan Sonnet (aka Shakespearean Sonnet). It has fourteen lines made up of three quatrains and one couplet. The whole poem is to set a scene or tell a story; each quatrain should be able to stand alone, but must…

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    Spellwork through Poetry, Lesson 6

    Lesson 6: Rhyming Couplets and Quatrains Couplets are back to back lines which end in similar sounding syllables. Quatrains are two sets of couplets, with one of four rhyming patterns, put together to make a group of four. The four patterns are: AABB, ABAB, ABBA, ABCB. For example: A The gloom of a rainy day A Won’t damper my spirits in May. B The best things I will ever see B Is everything that will be me. A The gloom of a rainy day, B The best things I will ever see A Can’t damper my spirits in May B And everything that will be me A The gloom of a…

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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 5

    Lesson 5: Writing Free Verse Free verse is non-rhyming poetry. It is not necessarily easier or better than rhyming poetry, just different. It is just one of the types of poetry under the blanket of non-rhyming poetry and is basically a no-rules free-for-all. We will be looking at one of my favorite examples of free-verse by one of my hands-down favorite poets. Earth, My Likeness by Walt Whitman EARTH, my likeness, Though you look so impassive, ample and spheric there, I now suspect that is not all; I now suspect there is something fierce in you eligible to burst forth, For an athlete is enamour’d of me, and I of…

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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 4

    Lesson 4: What is poetry Objective: to define poetry as an art form and a tool; to become familiar with the kinds of poetry we will be working with for the remainder of the class. What is poetry? “poetry is literature in metrical form” is what you will find in the dictionary. That barely scratches the surface of what poetry is. poetry really is something that is almost impossible to define, it is so varied from form to form, author to author, that it if definition-less. While we can’t make a nice definition wrapped in a little bow, we can discuss what poetry is. poetry is, in many critics’ opinions,…

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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 3

    Writing Out Intent in Prose Objective: explain in detail what you want and how you plan to attain it. In this class, I would like you to think of yourself as an architect. Last month, we discussed what our intents were. These are the blueprints to our spells. Now, we are going to begin the building process, starting with a sturdy foundation. We will mold our intentions into prose, adding as much detail as possible. The more detail we have, the sturdier our foundation and the easier it will be to write our poetic spells later. For your assignment, please take the intentions you wrote- the ones you will be…

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    Spellwork Through Poetry, Lesson 2

    What is intent? Objective: define intent; why is intent important The definition of intent- and all variations of the word: intend, intention, etc- are “state of mind when something is done, purpose, the end or object; goal”. Our intent is the most important thing we have when we go into spellwork. It not only is the most important, but the most basic; the most primal. What do YOU want? Put aside all of the fancy forms that we will learn later in this class. Put aside all of the words that you are bringing together. Put aside all of the props we commonly use in ritual: candles, incense, wand, chalice……