• Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Cherries   I’m inspired to write about cherries because of my next door neighbour. They have a huge cherry tree that hangs over into our garden. We don’t mind. In fact, we love it. Not only is it a beautiful tree, with strong, thick limbs and richly coloured bark, it encourages all kinds of wildlife. Just this afternoon, we all sat enraptured in the kitchen as a squirrel hopped around the back garden munching on the fallen cherries. They’re just starting to ripen as we leave the summer solstice behind, and the windfalls attract all manner of birds and small mammals. There are actually over 50…

  • Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Jack by the Hedge I don’t get a huge amount of time to spend keeping my garden super tidy, but that’s ok, because I like it to run a little wild. Because of that, we get plants that come in from outside the garden, often spread by birds and small animals, or simply by seeds blown in on the wind. Once such plant which is a star of British verges and hedgerows is this lovely plant, pictured. It has many names, but my favourite one is Jack by the Hedge, Latin name Alliaria Petiolata. Jack by the Hedge is also called Garlic Mustard, or even Poor…

  • Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Celery     Celery (Apium Graveolens) is an easily recognisable vegetable, available in most supermarkets or grocery stores. It’s a relative of carrots and parsley, part of the apiaceae family. It’s loved by dieters thanks to its high water content and low calorie content, plus it’s amazing for dipping into hummus or salsa. But is celery a medicinal or magical plant? Let’s take a look.   The Kitchen Garden Celery can be grown from seed and in fact can be planted at this time of year (February-March-April) as long as it’s kept warm until frost has gone. It needs to be kept moist so is ideal…

  • Crafting Articles

    Pixie Witch Kitchen

    Everything Under the Moon Soup   This is a great recipe I came up with a few years ago playing around in the kitchen. Isn’t that how all great recipes are made? It’s a very tasty, healthy, thick soup that you can eat by itself or with any meal. I like to serve it with baked chicken or pork chops. I named it everything under the Moon for a reason, as you can add anything to it. Ingredients 7 carrots 5 potatoes 1 white onion 4 celery stalks 2 zucchinis 1 tsp. minced garlic 1/2 cup red lentils 1 can (10oz) diced tomatoes with chilies 1/2 green cabbage (optional) 2…

  • Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Cow Parsley     Anthriscus Sylvestris or cow parsley is a member of the Apiaceae family, just like the carrot and hemlock. It has tall, hollow stems topped with a flurry of delicate white flowers. In Europe it is a common hedgerow plant, and a familiar sight to walkers and foragers. It’s one of the first flowers to appear by the roadside in spring. With many common names including the grand “Queen Anne’s Lace” and the morbid “Mother Die”, this plant is a piece of living history and an intriguing part of the British countryside.   The Kitchen Garden Encouraging cow parsley into the garden would…

  • Monthly Columns

    She Who is All – Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

    Hestia & Vesta, the Goddesses of Hearth & Home As we enter into that time of the year when folks gather together with family and friends, what better time to honor Hestia and Vesta, the Goddesses of Hearth and Home, in Greece and Rome respectively. (Photo credit: goddessgift.net) Hestia is the Greek Goddess of Hearth and Home. She took no human form, but was only seen in the fire of the Hearth. Homes were built from the center outward; this center always being the hearth, in which Hestia was always welcome. She was honored each morning and evening with an offering from each family, at their respective hearths, Hestia’s sacred…