• Monthly Columns

    The Bee – An Excerpt From Pagan Portals: Celtic Witchcraft by Mabh Savage

    The following includes an excerpt from Pagan Portals: Celtic Witchcraft by Mabh Savage   An animal that has had many sacred associations throughout the aeons, yet is mentioned all too infrequently in Celtic texts, is the bee. We know the Celts ate honey and drank mead, so they must have had skill with bees, yet it is rarely written of by the scholars of the middle ages who gave us most of the Celtic literature we now refer to. The bee is a dangerous animal that simply needs to be respected. Yes, a bee can sting you and undoubtedly it will hurt. It can even kill, if you are sensitive…

  • Monthly Columns

    Secrets of a Daffodil

      I place my ear gently to the golden trumpet What secrets do you hold? I heard you whispering Just as you called to Persephone Am I distracted by your beauty Waiting for Hades to snatch me away Or am I the kidnapper Of my own destiny? Narcissus whispers sweetly ‘Don’t be so hard on yourself’ And bobs his yellow head In the soft, spring breeze.   *** About the Author: Mabh Savage is a Pagan author, poet and musician, as well as a freelance journalist. She is the author of A Modern Celt: Seeking the Ancestors & Pagan Portals – Celtic Witchcraft: Modern Witchcraft Meets Celtic Ways.

  • Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – A New Dictionary of Fairies: A 21st Century Exploration of Celtic and Related Western European Fairies by Morgan Daimler

    Book Review A New Dictionary of Fairies A 21st Century Exploration of Celtic and Related Western European Fairies by Morgan Daimler 416 Pages Most people know of my views on fairies; specifically, my concerns when some people insist that fairies are wee, harmless creatures who only want to help us. The fae are powerful, unpredictable beings, but to be fair, they are also numerous and varied in type, and understanding them is a convoluted and confusing process. Morgan Daimler’s new book is a massive aid for anyone wanting to understand the world of fairies and magical beings. When I was a little girl, one of my favourite books was ‘A…

  • Monthly Columns

    Things to do with the Kids this Spring Equinox

      The Spring Equinox is also called the Vernal Equinox and is when day and night are roughly equal. It’s the halfway point between the winter solstice and the summer solstice. After the Spring equinox, the light increases a little every day, although the way up to the longest day of the summer solstice. In the Northern hemisphere, the spring equinox is on Thursday the 19th and Friday the 20th March, depending on location. In the Southern hemisphere, this is the autumnal equinox. The spring equinox for the Southern hemisphere will be on Tuesday 22nd September. The Spring Equinox is a great time to get kids involved with pagan activities,…

  • Monthly Columns

    Brigid’s Arrival

    (Art Poster Print of Brigid by Anette of Anette PRS Illustrations.)   When she comes She comes in the room Like a gulp of cold air A hurricane to the face A slap so soft and sharp So caring and cold So great and so bold So young yet so old Every atom sings This lady; this goddess; this spirit This sidhe, from beyond the hills She came to see What you had put out for her Sheep’s milk, oats and apples Whiskey, candles and hope. She blasts through the door A draught of delight In spring’s awakening. We hold hands and shake As her powers leaves us quaking. Motherly…

  • Monthly Columns

    Lambs in the Belly – An Excerpt from A Modern Celt by Mabh Savage

    (Image via Unsplash) Brigid, who is also known as Persephone Rises like an epiphany From the womb of Winter’s death. One of the year’s turning points is Imbolc, celebrated at the start of February; roughly half way between winter solstice and spring equinox (in the Northern hemisphere anyway- in the southern hemisphere this would be around the start of August, around the time we are celebrating Lughnasadh). This is the time of year when you really start to notice that yes, the days are getting longer and lighter, and the air is beginning to warm. Imbolc is a celebration of the coming spring, making it through the harshest part of…

  • Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Celery     Celery (Apium Graveolens) is an easily recognisable vegetable, available in most supermarkets or grocery stores. It’s a relative of carrots and parsley, part of the apiaceae family. It’s loved by dieters thanks to its high water content and low calorie content, plus it’s amazing for dipping into hummus or salsa. But is celery a medicinal or magical plant? Let’s take a look.   The Kitchen Garden Celery can be grown from seed and in fact can be planted at this time of year (February-March-April) as long as it’s kept warm until frost has gone. It needs to be kept moist so is ideal…

  • Monthly Columns

    January Joy: New Year; New You?

      I want to lend some spiritual advice to all those bombarded with the inevitable January blast of “New Year, New You” thinking. There’s a lot of advertising out there telling you that you need to change. Here’s what I think. You don’t need to go on a diet. Unless a medical professional tells you different, or you genuinely want to for your own reasons, you are fine as you are. You don’t need to buy new sports gear. If you want to, great! But don’t be pressured or guilt tripped into it. You don’t need a crazy new exercise routine. Exercise is amazing. It boosts endorphins, it makes you…

  • Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – How to Save the Planet: 10 Simple Steps That Can Change the World by Luke Eastwood

    Book Review How to Save the Planet 10 Simple Steps That Can Change the World by Luke Eastwood 102 Pages     Let me start by saying that this kind of primer is absolutely essential. We know climate change is a serious issue. We know humans have the biggest impact on the planet. As a society, we understand this. But on an individual level, I think our understanding has that surreal kind of disconnection that means we don’t quite get that it means us. You. Me. Everyone. We all have to change and we all have to change now. Luke’s book is not only a way to reconnect with this…

  • Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Cow Parsley     Anthriscus Sylvestris or cow parsley is a member of the Apiaceae family, just like the carrot and hemlock. It has tall, hollow stems topped with a flurry of delicate white flowers. In Europe it is a common hedgerow plant, and a familiar sight to walkers and foragers. It’s one of the first flowers to appear by the roadside in spring. With many common names including the grand “Queen Anne’s Lace” and the morbid “Mother Die”, this plant is a piece of living history and an intriguing part of the British countryside.   The Kitchen Garden Encouraging cow parsley into the garden would…