• Monthly Columns

    The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

    Healing Goddesses   (Previously published July, 2015, with some modifications) Like so many others, I am saddened, devastated and scared by the outbreak of this horrific and deadly virus that has stricken our world. This month’s Goddess column will be on just a few of the Healing Goddesses, whom I ask to please look kindly upon us all, to send us the strength and courage that we will all need to persevere through this. Coventina The British Goddess of springs and wells, she was also a Goddess of abundance and inspiration. Her sacred well, located in Northumberland, is considered a sacred healing site. Anaita While there is not much information…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Asclepius     Asclepius is the ancient Greek god of medicine, healing, wisdom, rejuvenation and physicians. His name means “to cut open” because his mother, Coronis, died during labor and his father, Apollo, performed the first cesarean section by cutting the child out of her womb. Asclepius married Epione, the goddess of soothing. Their daughters were Panacea (goddess of medicines), Aegle (goddess of good health), Aceso (goddess of the healing process), Iaso (the goddess of recuperation) and Hygieia (the goddess of health, Hygiene). They also had three sons. According to GreekMythology.com, “At some point, Asclepius healed a snake, which in return taught him secret knowledge – snakes…

  • Monthly Columns

    She Who is All – The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

    Sulis/Sul     It is all one being ill being well It is all energy energy in constant motion energy in constant flux restless energy that is never still ruthless energy that acts like a steam roller boundless energy that brings possibilities sparkling energy that tickles and sings stored energy that waits for release The healing waters at my shrine regenerated revitalized brought clarity mended holes opened vision allowed flow with energy flowing the dance of life resumes illness and wellness all one all energy all flow (Image and Poem Credit: The Goddess Oracle by Amy Sophia Marashinsky, Illustrated by Hrana Janto) Sulis is the ancient British Goddess of healing…

  • Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – Beyond the North Wind by Christopher McIntosh

    Book Review Beyond the North Wind by Christopher McIntosh 256 Pages     The Forward of this book is written by Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson, who is the High Priest of the Icelandic ÁSATRÚ Association. I found the story of his meeting and developing friendship with Mr. McIntosh, at times, whimsical and tender at the same time. But I also found the respect that runs very deep in that friendship. This book covers a subject, Hyperborean, that I used to talk about with my father. When I was seven years old, my dad would talk about all the different world beliefs that he had heard or read. He would talk about…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Cernunnos     Merry meet. Cernunnos is one of the Ancient Ones, as old as the earth. The nature and fertility god is said to have been born of the All Mother Anu, working his magic in the wildwood as the first humans on earth came to be. He was part of evolution, seen “as a shape-shifting, shamanic god of the Hunt” in prehistoric times, according to the article, “Cernunnos – Ancient Celtic God” by J. M. Reinbold. His image was painted on cave walls and carved into cliffs. People dressed in skins, bones and feathers danced to communicate with him. They still do a dance in…

  • Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – Warriors, Witches, Women: Mythology’s Fiercest Females by Kate Hodge

    Book Review Warriors, Witches, Women Mythology’s Fiercest Females by Kate Hodge 224 Pages     Kate Hodge’s book, “Warriors, Witches, Women,” is a modern encyclopedia of powerful female archetypes from various world cultures. She divides the goddesses into five main categories: witches, warriors, bringers of misfortune, elemental spirits, and munificent spirits. Hodge re-tells stories of goddesses who are well known and introduces us to ones who are lesser known in this volume. Dividing them into distinct categories that focus on a theme helps the reader to see the different faces of the goddess clearly. Because this is a cross-cultural work of sorts, we also see how various cultures have picked…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Ullr     Merry meet. Winter is upon us, and up north, in the land of the Norse, was the cold-loving god Ullr. Norse mythology called him the God of Snow. Son of Six and stepson of Thor, Ullr became the patron saint of skiers. It is said he’s an expert skater, skier and hunter who moved around the world, covering the land with snow. References indicate he was an important deity: it is said he ruled while Odin was temporarily exiled and he occurs in many place names, but little else is known.   (Ullr. Small Wooden Figurines created by Kseniya of AncientGods on Etsy.)  …

  • Reviews & Interviews

    Book Review – Dancing with Raven and Bear: A Book of Earth Medicine and Animal Magic by Sonja Grace

    Book Review Dancing with Raven and Bear: A Book of Earth Medicine and Animal Magic by Sonja Grace 144 Pages     Drawing on both her Native American (Hopi) heritage and her Norwegian upbringing, Sonja Grace presents 18 original wisdom stories about Earth Medicine and animal magic. In them she’s woven ancient teachings and everyday practical applications such as grounding, mending a broken heart and dream interpretation. Each chapter is a tale, followed by an explanation of the magic and medicine of Raven, Bear and Earth. Ancient teachings are interwoven with descriptions of such practices as smudging and energizing water for healing. Grace shows parallels between Norse mythology and Native…

  • Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Hyacinth   The hyacinth is a flowering plant which grows from a bulb. It has beautiful clusters of fragrant flowers and is very popular during the holiday season and spring. This easy to grow plant has a wealth of history and mythology, and could bring a touch of magic into your home as well as a blast of floral colour and fragrance.   The Kitchen Garden Hyacinths are poisonous so aren’t grown for culinary purposes. They contain oxalic acid, a compound that causes skin irritation externally. If taken internally it can cause: Damage to mucous membranes Damage to respiratory tract Wheezing Shortness of breath Laryngitis Inflammation…