• Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Loki     With the renewed interest in Norse mythology, Loki has gained popularity. Today he is typically portrayed as mischievous and self-serving, yet charming and lovable. While he’s sometimes an antagonist, he’s rarely a bad guy. In Norse mythology, he is all that and more; he is know as the cunning trickster god, sometimes getting the Æsir (gods of the principal Norse pantheon including Odin, Frigg, Höðr, Thor, and Bald) in trouble, other times getting them out. The son of the giant Farbauti and brother to Thor, Loki is most often in male form, but does not follow gender norms and changes both his sex and…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Horus     Horus was the ancient Egyptian god of the sky, the sun, and kingship, worshiped for more than three thousand years. During that time, he appeared in many manifestations, each embodying a different facet of his being. Egyptians recognized each incarnation to be aspects of the same god. He is best known as the son of Isis and Osiris. His brother, Seth, killed their father, so to keep him safe, Isis hid Horus beside the Nile. When he grew strong, he fought his brother to retake his father’s throne, thus associating him with kingship. Considered Egypt’s first divine king, those on the throne after Horus…

  • Reviews

    Book Review – Healing Plants of Greek Myth by Angela Paine

    Book Review Healing Plants of Greek Myth by Angela Paine Published by Moon Books 348 pages Publication date: April 29, 2022     Angela Paine’s Healing Plants of Greek Myth has a wonderfully focused subject area which it sticks to very well: exploring the plants which play roles in ancient Greek mythology, especially those which had medicinal use. It’s useful to note that unknown and potentially fictional plants do not make an appearance here; moly, for example, is not explored at all. The book starts with a detailed introduction to the central deities, heroes, and stories of Greek mythology, as well as a lovely description of the author’s visit to…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Faunus     As part of the festival of Lupercalia, held on February 15, the ancient Romans honored Faunus, the god of forests, fields, and plains. One of the oldest Roman deities, he epitomizes the reproductive force intrinsic in the universe. He is the essence of wild male sexual energy and the urgent biological need to procreate. Similar to the Greek god Pan, Faunus is typically depicted as an attractive man from the waist up and a goat from the waist down, with human feet and goat horns. He kept company with similar creatures, known as fauns, in the woodlands. While delicate and humble, they were also…

  • Monthly Columns

    As Above, So Below (How the Stars Became Our Hearts)

    Who Are The Dark Goddesses?     Before we begin, as a disclaimer, it should be noted that with the old gods, stories differ from source to source, and were never canonized. An ironic word to use in that the word canonization comes from the canonization of the Bible. So in effect, the word doubles its meaning, in that they are religious texts non canonized, and that the various stories written about them are done so non canonically. The gods and are something that can only be expressed, not explained. Above is a picture of Shiva. Some of you may know, he is one of the Principal Deities of Hinduism.…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Anubis     Anubis is the Egyptian god of the underworld, of the afterlife, and mummification. He helped judge souls after their death and guided lost souls into the afterlife. While it is generally believed Anubis is the son of Osiris and Nephthys and the product of adultery, this is not confirmed. What is known is he had a daughter known as Kebechet (or Qebehet) with the head of a serpent.     A jackal-headed deity, and sometimes with the head of a dog, Anubis is the Greek name for “the guardian of the tombs.” He’s also known as the Lord of the Necropolis. For ancient Egyptians…

  • Monthly Columns,  Spells & Rituals

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Nun   The oldest of ancient Egyptian gods is Nun (also Nu), the father of Ra, the sun god. Nun means “primeval waters.” Although the Egyptians had many creation myths, all agreed the universe came from Nun’s primordial waters. The sun rising from the sea each morning was considered a reenactment of the creation myth. Legends have said at the end of the world, everything will sink beneath the waters of chaos from which creation begun. No priesthoods, cults, or temples were devoted solely to Nun, but when digging foundations for temples, Egyptians dug down until they reached water so the temple was literally rising out of…

  • Monthly Columns

    She Who is All – The Goddess & The Divine Female

    Nemesis     (Image Credit: mythologyexplained.com)   Nemesis. The name sounds as if She were an enemy; She most certainly is not. She is the Greek Goddess of Divine Retribution. She is sometimes known as the Goddess of Rhamnous, the city where Her temple was. She was worshipped as Invidia in Rome.   The Temple at Rhamnous (Image Credit: alamy.com)   Her family origins are confusing, as they tend to be. Some claim that her parents were Zeus and Nyx, Goddess of Magic; some sources state that her only parent was Nyx. Other sources name Oceana, the world ocean, as her mother. She is also named as sister to the…

  • Monthly Columns

    She Who Is All – The Goddess & The Divine Female

    Sphinx   (Image Credit & Following Quote: The Goddess Oracle by Amy Sophia Marashinsky)   “If I ask the question that provokes will you stretch to find the answer Will you take up the gauntlet flung boldly and defiantly answer the call Will you meet my challenge with tingling in your blood with your hair blowing electric in the wind with all your being knowing that every challenge is an opportunity every challenge presents a gift every challenge is there to serve you or not It’s your choice” The Sphinx may have started out as male, and is still perceived as such today, in Egypt, built as the Guardian of…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Ra     Merry meet. Cultures since the beginning of time have worshiped the sun. In Egypt, which extends south into the Tropic of Cancer, Ra the sun god was powerful. He was the creator of everything as well as king of all the gods. As such, Ra was a just ruler and a kind father. He’s also a warrior and can dispel darkness with his light. His representation varies: while the most often he is depicted as a man with the head of a hawk crowned by a solar disk he carries across the sky each day, he is also shown as a man with the head…