• Monthly Columns

    Witch Hunt

      There are witches all around us. You can find them anywhere… The Witch on Wheels has been documenting her findings.   Meet Monica Cox As a Sagittarius born in the Year of the Dragon, Monica Cox is very much a fiery witch whom I met at a Beltane festival. “Dragons are just fun. I like the big, fat, ‘Puff the Magic Dragon,’ cute, fluffy ones. I have to be very careful to have a lot of water around me because I have a very fiery personality. And earth. Earth grounds me so well,” she said of her 170-acre farm, her 45 animals and the mountains surrounding them all. “We…

  • Monthly Columns

    As Above So Below (How the Stars Became Our Hearts) 2nd Edition

    How to Cook Cliché     What is the nature of reality?   As Morpheus from The Matrix describes, if real is what we experience with our senses, then it’s simply electrical signals interpreted by your brain. As Plato describes in Allegory of the Cave, you can only postulate at what the universe really is by deductive logic based on the very limited sensory data interpreted by the brain.    This isn’t a new thought.   What is new is now we have scientific evidence that the universe may be nothing more than a simulation.   We’ve been indoctrinated by surface physics. That is to say, our entire interpretation of…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Lugh     The Celts, who lived in central Europe, worshipped Lugh (or Lug) as their Sun god. He is one of the most prominent gods from Irish mythology with many skills including fierce warrior, master craftsman, harpist, poet, and king. Fulfilling a prophecy, he grew up to kill his grandfather, Balor, the god of the underworld. Lugh (pronounced Loo) is associated with the festival of Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-NA-sah), which bears his name. It is celebrated as the first harvest – traditionally August 1 – by those who keep the tradition alive. Astrologically, it falls on August 6, 2020.     He is depicted as a tall,…

  • Monthly Columns

    Celebrating the Old Ways in New Times Lughnasadh/Lammas

    Celebrating the Old Ways in New Times for August 2020 Lughnasadh/Lammas Bright Blessings! This year is flying by. I can hardly believe it’s almost Lammas or Lughnassadh, depending on which you celebrate. Both are first harvest, celebrating first fruits, some being wheat, some being corn or berries, and all giving thanks for the beneficial harvest from hard work. Today’s Pagans seldom grow wheat and corn, since nowadays, we buy it! For us, our harvests are symbolic! Let’s do a bit of history before talking about personal harvests!   Lughnasadh Halfway between Summer Solstice and Autumn Equinox, Lughnasadh is an old Pagan holiday celebrated in Scotland, Ireland, and the Isle of…

  • Monthly Columns

    3 Pagans and a Cat Podcast Monthly Feature

    3 Pagans and a Cat Podcast Three Paths, One Journey, No Cat In this highly informative & entertaining podcast, three family members embroiled in wildly divergent traditions gather in one room to discuss, debate, and flat-out argue about their magical, mythical, and mundane lives, all for our education and pleasure.   While Waiting to Hear This Month’s Casts, Why Not Catch Up on Last Month’s… Episode 95: Protest – Car, Gwyn, and Ode talk about George Floyd and other black people murdered by police in the United States, good protest practices, and magical protection for resistance. Episode 96: Death and Rebirth – Gwyn and Ode (without Car, due to migraine)…

  • Monthly Columns

    Celebrating the Old Ways in New Times

    Celebrating the Old Ways in New Times for July 2020 Bright Blessings, I don’t need to tell you the World is being shaken by it’s very foundations right now. As it should be. The murder of another black American at the hands of corrupt police mobilized a movement, demanding justice and change. As a white person, even though I’m a minority being female, deaf, Pagan, and having mental health challenges, I’ve endured my share of discrimination, and had my life held up by it. But this is absolutely nothing compared with the hell people of color in this country go through. I don’t know what it feels like to be…

  • Monthly Columns

    The Goddess of Ten Thousand Names

    Blodeuedd/Blodeuwedd (Image: The Avalonian Oracle) Flower face. Innocent. Delicate. Brought into being without consent, without question, without knowing. Arianrhod swore that her son would remain nameless, unless given a name by her. She swore that her son would never get arms/weapons, unless given them by her. She swore that her son would never have a wife from the land. Her son got a name, Llew Llau Gyffes and was armed by his mother through trickery and deceit. When he wanted a wife, one was made for him from oak, meadowsweet and broom, among other herbs and flowers. Blodeuedd, as she was originally named, was made by the magician, Gwydion and…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Dhanvantar     With the country still reeling from a pandemic, demands for racial justice and calls to end police brutality, meet Lord Dhanvantari, the Hindu god of healing. He is one of the greatest deities because he gave people the knowledge of Ayurveda, the traditional Hindu system of medicine. In his four hands, the physician god carries a bowl of amrit (the nectar of immortality), a discus or chakra (a divine weapon to cut away evil), a conch shell (when ground it’s used in some medicines), and herbs. He is dressed in yellow clothes, with a wreath of herbs and flowers around his neck. His eyes…

  • Monthly Columns

    Notes from the Apothecary

    Notes from the Apothecary: Cherries   I’m inspired to write about cherries because of my next door neighbour. They have a huge cherry tree that hangs over into our garden. We don’t mind. In fact, we love it. Not only is it a beautiful tree, with strong, thick limbs and richly coloured bark, it encourages all kinds of wildlife. Just this afternoon, we all sat enraptured in the kitchen as a squirrel hopped around the back garden munching on the fallen cherries. They’re just starting to ripen as we leave the summer solstice behind, and the windfalls attract all manner of birds and small mammals. There are actually over 50…

  • Monthly Columns

    As Above So Below (How the Stars Became Our Hearts)

    Entheogen Influence Across Time and Culture When a baby draws its first breath, somehow its lungs already know how to extract oxygen from the air, and exchange it for carbon dioxide. It already knows how to transfer oxygen to the blood, where red blood cells already know how to use that oxygen. When a seed first sprouts, its roots already know how to absorb water and minerals from the soil, it already knows how to use sunlight to synthesize food for energy. The mystery of life, of consciousness. DNA encoded with information since the very first cell magickally appeared on earth. Ancient wisdom and adaptation, present at the dawn of…