• Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Loki     With the renewed interest in Norse mythology, Loki has gained popularity. Today he is typically portrayed as mischievous and self-serving, yet charming and lovable. While he’s sometimes an antagonist, he’s rarely a bad guy. In Norse mythology, he is all that and more; he is know as the cunning trickster god, sometimes getting the Æsir (gods of the principal Norse pantheon including Odin, Frigg, Höðr, Thor, and Bald) in trouble, other times getting them out. The son of the giant Farbauti and brother to Thor, Loki is most often in male form, but does not follow gender norms and changes both his sex and…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Horus     Horus was the ancient Egyptian god of the sky, the sun, and kingship, worshiped for more than three thousand years. During that time, he appeared in many manifestations, each embodying a different facet of his being. Egyptians recognized each incarnation to be aspects of the same god. He is best known as the son of Isis and Osiris. His brother, Seth, killed their father, so to keep him safe, Isis hid Horus beside the Nile. When he grew strong, he fought his brother to retake his father’s throne, thus associating him with kingship. Considered Egypt’s first divine king, those on the throne after Horus…

  • Reviews

    Interview With Molly Remer of Brigid’s Grove

    Brigid’s Grove Represents the Integrity, Interests & Skills of Its Founding Family     Molly Remer has worked with groups of women since 1996. Prior to creating Brigid’s Grove, she had a blog and a website for public outreach that ran concurrently: Talk Birth for support of birth work, and Woodspriestess about her priestessing and her life in the woods. “I was making birth art figurines and goddesses. My roots are in birth work, childbirth education, and domestic violence activism,” she said in a telephone interview in May. Her husband, Mark, spent fifteen years as a computer programmer and web developer for large state organizations. In 2013, they sat on…

  • Monthly Columns

    Poem – Divine Love

      A poem for anyone that has ever felt pure love for or from their deities.   Love All my life I wondered about Divine love I have been devoted Twice before And felt adoration Awe Terror Humility And yes, a sort of love A connection beyond The mundane I knew I loved I appreciated I was grateful. But love? I didn’t feel it In return Maybe appreciated Maybe thanked or honoured When I followed through On oaths Commitments Daily devotionals But love? I didn’t expect it I didn’t miss it I didn’t yearn for it Because I was already So fulfilled   Then you came back Into my life…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Faunus     As part of the festival of Lupercalia, held on February 15, the ancient Romans honored Faunus, the god of forests, fields, and plains. One of the oldest Roman deities, he epitomizes the reproductive force intrinsic in the universe. He is the essence of wild male sexual energy and the urgent biological need to procreate. Similar to the Greek god Pan, Faunus is typically depicted as an attractive man from the waist up and a goat from the waist down, with human feet and goat horns. He kept company with similar creatures, known as fauns, in the woodlands. While delicate and humble, they were also…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Anubis     Anubis is the Egyptian god of the underworld, of the afterlife, and mummification. He helped judge souls after their death and guided lost souls into the afterlife. While it is generally believed Anubis is the son of Osiris and Nephthys and the product of adultery, this is not confirmed. What is known is he had a daughter known as Kebechet (or Qebehet) with the head of a serpent.     A jackal-headed deity, and sometimes with the head of a dog, Anubis is the Greek name for “the guardian of the tombs.” He’s also known as the Lord of the Necropolis. For ancient Egyptians…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Ra     Merry meet. Cultures since the beginning of time have worshiped the sun. In Egypt, which extends south into the Tropic of Cancer, Ra the sun god was powerful. He was the creator of everything as well as king of all the gods. As such, Ra was a just ruler and a kind father. He’s also a warrior and can dispel darkness with his light. His representation varies: while the most often he is depicted as a man with the head of a hawk crowned by a solar disk he carries across the sky each day, he is also shown as a man with the head…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Belenus     Belenus is one of the most ancient, beloved and widely worshiped Celtic deities. It is believed that the Latin name evolved from Bel or Belen, a Celtic word interpreted as “brilliant,” “shining,” or “luminous.” Orally, little is known about Belenus. The most archaeological remains dedicated to him were found in France, thought to be the center of his worship, but artifacts and references to him have been found in Northern Italy, Southern Gaul, the Alps, Austria, Rome, Scotland, Spain, and Britain. His shrines were often dedicated to healing and included therapeutic springs. “Votive offerings found at his shrine at Sainte-Sabine include terra-cotta horses and…

  • Monthly Columns

    GoodGod!

    Meet the Gods: Apollo     As the sun begins shining a bit more each day, let’s turn to Apollo, the Olympian sun god. In Greek mythology, there were twelve original Titans. Helios was god of the sun who was said to drive a chariot pulled by four horses, sometimes winged, across the sky. According to theoi.com, “Helios was depicted as a handsome, usually beardless, man clothed in purple robes and crowned with the shining aureole of the sun.” Slowly over time, Helios became viewed as being Apollo, one of the Twelve Olympians – the sun god who is the son of Zeus.     Most commonly associated as the…

  • Monthly Columns

    She Who is All – Goddesses and the Divine Female

    CERNUNA (Image Credit – Deviant Art by Kendigo)   I had a special request to do a column on the Horned Goddess Cernuna. As it turned out, there is not much available on Her. As per usual, She seems to have been superseded by the Horned God Cernunnos, who is represented by his torque, holding a snake and surrounded by animals.     It would/could be assumed that all representations are of Cernunnos, however a small bust of a Horned Goddess was found in Kent, UK. Two others have also been found; one rests in the British Museum of London and the other at the Musee de Clermont-Ferrard in France.…