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The Road to Runes

June 1st, 2019

The Road to Runes: Back to Basics

The
Elder Futhark runes are a Germanic alphabet, a writing system and a
divination tool. For the past few months, I’ve focused on a
different rune or reading every month. I thought it might be useful
to list each of the runes and their meaning as a point of reference.
This month, I’m focusing on the first ætt, or set of eight of the
24 runes. This ætt is known as Freyr’s, Frey’s or Freyja’s
ætt. Each ætt is dedicated to a deity or deities, or overseen by
them, to match that ætt to the aspects of those deities.

Frey
and Freyja are Vanir twins. They feature heavily in the mythology
surrounding the war between Aesir and Vanir. They represent various,
complex aspects of humanity and divinity, but at their simplest are
associated with fertility, re-birth, wealth and expansion or
increase. They are also often linked to emotional and physical
happiness and compassion.

Each
of the runes I’ve gone into in a bit more detail in past posts has
a link to the relevant article.

Fehu:

The
sound “F” as in “Fulsome.” The rune meaning is most often
given as “cattle.” Fehu is associated with the colours green and
brown. The ownership of cattle has frequently indicated wealth, so
the rune Fehu is often associated with material possessions and
financial success. It can also be a warning against greed or becoming
a “slave to the wage”. Just as cattle can either be passive and
calm, or a chargin, raging herd, Fehu can represent either abundance
or destruction. With this in mind, Fehu is also associated with
fertility and the creation of life, as well as the natural cycles of
death and rebirth.

Uruz:

The
sound “oo” as in “loose.” The rune means Aurochs, a wild ox.
This rune can be associated with both the colours orange and dark
green. Like Fehu, there is a link to cattle, and therefore it’s
easy to think this rune also means wealth and power. However, the
Aurochs is wild and untameable, so this is power we cannot control; a
primal force. Uruz may mean that success is just around the corner,
waiting to manifest. Uruz is also linked to physical and mental
wellbeing, and a deeper understanding of one’s self.

Thurisaz:

The sound “th” as in “Thorn,” which is this rune’s meaning, although it also means “Giant.” Thurisaz may be associated with the colour white. Thurisaz is a rune of defense and protection. It is about directing a destructive force at one’s enemies- or dealing with conflict in the most direct way possible. This may mean remaining completely passive and avoiding a conflict, or it may mean taking immediate action. Thurisaz warns of a storm on the horizon and allows time to prepare. It is the protective hedge of hawthorn, a boundary between the reader and harm. Thurisaz is also linked to regeneration and the replenishment of things. Expect new beginnings and a fresh start or renewed motivation.

Ansuz:

The sound “aah” as in “heart”. This rune means breath or mouth, and is often associated with the divine breath or sound of creation. It may be associated with the colour purple, often used to represent spirit in Wiccan practices. This is Woden’s or Odin’s rune, and represents the links between thought, word, and creativity. Ansuz can indicate that even in times of chaos, order can prevail to find a way through. It encourages the reader to find patterns within the madness and trust in the natural flow of things. Take a leap of faith.

Raidho:

The sound “R” as in “Riding.” This rune means wheel, and is associated with traveling and journeys. It can be associated with the colours blue and black. Raidho reminds the reader of the dangers of remaining stationary and lapsing into stagnation. In order to be in the right place at the right time, it’s important to keep moving. This may mean physically, metaphorically, or metaphysically. Is there a need to move house, travel, attend a reunion? Or is there another job that calls? Or perhaps a spiritual journey has reached an obstacle and needs to change path- or does the reader need to power on through? Raidho is encouragement to trust the inner compass, and to avoid becoming trapped. This may mean breaking free of the imprisonment of existing beliefs, ideals, or self-image.

Kenaz:

The
sound “k” as in “Ken”. Kenaz means torch, and is associated
with the colour yellow. Like the torch, Kenaz shines a light into the
darkest corners. This rune brings illumination to puzzling
situations, lending knowledge, understanding and learning to one’s
life. Kenaz is a fire rune and represents creation, sacrifice, and
the use of fire as a hearth or forge in order to make the will and
intellect manifest. Kenaz is often seen as the rune of the
craftsperson or artist, particularly when looking for inspiration or
the training and increasing of creative skills. Kenaz may also be
associated with love and lust, and the combining of opposites to
create something positive.

Gebo:

The
sound “g” as in “giving.” Gebo literally means gift and its
meaning is closely linked to the honour and respect shown between
people when they willingly exchange gifts. Gebo may be associated
with the colours gold, silver or red. As well as being the rune of
giving and generosity, Gebo represents the connection between humans
and the gods, and the forces and honour which are exchanged through
this connection. A human is bound to their deity through respect,
sacrifice, offerings and love. The God or Goddess is bound to the
human through the exchange of divine favour or knowledge. Because of
this, Gebo is often linked to positive partnerships, contracts, and
even love. Love between siblings is sometimes indicated, or Gebo may
refer to the partnership and attraction/connection between two (or
more!) lovers.

Wunjo:

The
sound “w” or “v” as in “well-being” or “vitality.”
This rune’s literal meaning is joy or delight, and it can either be
associated with the colours pink or blue. The importance of happiness
is recognised in Norse mythology, as an intrinsic part of courage and
hope- crucial for the potential hero or warrior. Wunjo indicates that
good things are coming. This could be the end of a long-running
argument or conflict. It could be an increase in self-confidence.
Wunjo is a reminder that if people are pleasant and good to be
around, other people will be more likely to be nice to them! A simple
message, but one that is easy to forget when times, or hearts, are
hard. Wunjo is also associated with physical healing, and the healing
of the heart and mind after emotional difficulties.

Which of these runes would you like me to focus on next? Let me know on Twitter via @Mabherick or by emailing us. Until next time!

***

About
the Author:

Mabh
Savage
 is
a Pagan author, poet and musician, as well as a freelance journalist.

She is the author of A Modern Celt: Seeking the Ancestors & Pagan Portals – Celtic Witchcraft: Modern Witchcraft Meets Celtic Ways.

A Modern Celt: Seeking the Ancestors on Amazon

Pagan Portals – Celtic Witchcraft: Modern Witchcraft Meets Celtic Ways on Amazon

The Road to Runes: Hagalaz, the Coming of Hail

So, it was the turn of a different friend to pull a rune this time, and I wasn’t expecting it. On the spot divination, she pulled out the polished, burnt piece of hazel and looked at me quizzically. I had to admit to her that my studies had not taken me this far, and thus, my latest article was born. Pictured is the rune she pulled: Hagalaz, also known as Haglaz or Hagala. This rune literally means ‘hail’, and by what I have learnt, is a pretty fierce and somewhat scary rune to see in any divination.

The Elder Futhark (the group of runes I am working with and believed to be the oldest Germanic runic alphabet) is split into 3 Aett, or groups of 8 runes. Hagalaz is the first rune of the second Aett, or Aettir. There are so many variants of the terms used to describe the runes and their alphabetic structure, and while I am still learning I am keeping myself open to all of these words, so forgive me if I chop and change. The second Aettir is sometimes known as Hel’s Aetirr, which sounds pretty ominous. Hel is the daughter of Loki, and therefore at least part giant, and she reigns over the realm of Hel, one of the dwelling places of the dead in Norse mythology. She is fairly indifferent to the trials and sufferings of humankind, if not actually cruel, and that aspect seems to be reflected in the hail rune. Hail is out of our control. It doesn’t care if we get cold, or wet, or stung. It has no pity for our misery; it simply is, and it is up to us to deal with it; get out of the cold or battle on through the storm.

Hail is the coldest of seeds… (Viking Rune Poem)

Hail is often described in runic inscriptions as a seed, and perhaps this is simply due to its appearance, as if someone high above was casting ice cold grain onto the earth, in the vain hope of it sprouting into some bizarre crop. However, there is more to the seed aspect than simple appearances. If we are tested, and we follow through with the test, whether we pass or fail, we grow as people. Each new challenge we face changes us in some way, usually for the better. Even bad experiences teach us something. Hagalaz is a seed rune because although hard times may be coming, there is the chance for great personal transformation; to be the sprouting wheat after the grain is cast.

Hail is whitest of grains. It whirls from the sky

whipped by the wind, then as water it trickles away. (Old English Rune Poem, translation Marijane Osborn)

This is a reminder that hard times don’t last forever; just as the icy hail turns to water and trickles away, so will our hardships eventually come to an end. We may be whipped into shape by the storms that buffet us, by the challenges that are sent to test us, but ultimately, calm will come, and a time to take stock and see what we have learnt, gained, or been left with. Also, it could be that we are about to lose something, but perhaps that is something we should have let go of long ago. Are we holding on to something that does not help us achieve our highest goals? Are we clinging to a relationship that prevents us being the best we can be? Hagalaz warns that it may be a tough time, but something different is coming, and it’s up to us to make the best of the new situation.

Hagala who breaks helmets… (Runic Inscription on the Kragehul Lance)

So far, I’ve concentrated on the more positive aspects of Hagalaz, but I can’t avoid the simple fact that this is a rune associated with destruction, turmoil, conflict and crisis. Hail is coming and you’re going to be caught out in the storm. If you’re already having a tough time, it’s possible it could get worse before it gets better. Are you ready to be tested? Be prepared, have your wits sharp, don’t be complacent about any potentially upsetting or risky situation and muster your inner strength. Yes, transformation and growth might be just around the corner, but you’re going to have to turn your face into the cold wind and really push hard before you feel the benefits.

The ninth rune in the Elder Futhark, just as Yggdrasil holds nine worlds, Hagalaz is a powerful and crucial rune in any reading. I think it’s important not to panic if you do pull this rune for a client. I’ll admit, when my friend pulled the rune and I read the meaning, I was startled and worried at first, but thinking about her personal situation (private, sorry!) it makes sense. She’s been through a tough time, it’s not over yet, and we’d already spoken about certain things probably not being resolved to satisfaction until Samhain. A gifted practitioner herself, it doesn’t surprise me that she pulled the rune that almost exactly describes the situation she is in and where she appears to be going. And it gave me the chance to learn about a formidable rune; one more step along the road.

***

About the Author:

Mabh Savage is a Pagan author, poet and musician, as well as a freelance journalist.

She is the author of A Modern Celt: Seeking the Ancestors and Pagan Portals: Celtic Witchcraft.

Follow Mabh on TwitterFacebook and her blog.

Click Images for Amazon Information

The Road to Runes: Raidho, The Traveler’s Rune

The fifth rune in the Elder Futhark, Raidho is also the fifth rune in first ætt, or set of eight runes. These first eight runes are known as Freya’s ætt, and relate to physical and emotional happiness, nurturing and compassion. Raidho literally means riding or wagon, and as such is strongly associated with journeys, arrivals, departures, reunions, relocations, traveling and vehicles. The overriding theme is not remaining stationary. Of course, not all journeys are physical. Each one of us is a traveler, making our own winding way down life’s path. We are all on a spiritual journey as well as physical one. Our experiences and insights on our journeys shape us and create the individual soul and presence that makes us who we are.

For this reading, I followed up on a previous divination I did for myself, and asked what the next year held for me in terms of starting a freelance career in writing. I was focused solely on the future, rather than the here-and-now. Previously I pondered about whether I was making the right decision, and was basically told, “Get on with it!”. Now I’m wondering if the runes have any insights about what I might expect along the way, at least in the short-term future.

The traveler’s rune seems an apt response for this question as this is definitely an exciting journey I am on. Each day holds new challenges and new anxieties, yet many small triumphs that make it all worthwhile. Raidho is all about trusting your own inner compass, and not being still but having the courage to step away from where you are, towards where you need to be. I feel like I am doing that, one tiny step at a time, and this reading definitely encourages me to keep going.

When I initially asked about my change in career, I was given Ansuz, Odin’s rune, the breath of the universe and the rune of words. The message seemed to be to concentrate on the words, the power within them and trust in my leap of faith and not indulge in self-doubt. This next rune, focusing much more on what will happen next, and what the future holds, seems much more focused on the challenges this journey may hold. I feel as if the runes or the power channeled through them has recognised that this is, indeed, a new and significant journey I am taking. Though I have written for many (so many!) years, this is the first time I am relying solely on my own skills with words to feed and shelter my family. That’s a huge step, and the journey is very much based on my own determination and willingness not to give up when things get tough.

The Rune Secrets website tells us that one of the key concepts for Raidho is freedom from imprisonment, and in a way, my decision to work from home is just that. I felt trapped in my office job, even on good days. Feeling trapped makes everything about us smaller, until we remember the ultimate responsibility of every prisoner: to escape. But like anyone who has been in confinement for too long, adjusting to freedom will be difficult, and this rune tells me that the journey may be arduous, and I may have to let go of concepts about my life or my inner self that I have clung to for too long. I don’t even know what these might be at this time, but I am not surprised to be told this. I have formed serious work habits based on ‘having a boss’, deadlines, hierarchies and so forth. Breaking these habits will probably be the key to becoming a successful, full-time freelance writer.

I hope my journey with the traveling rune has bought you some insights about what this rune could mean for you in your own divination. Feel free to tweet me @Mabherick if you want me to choose a particular rune to study for next month’s Road to Runes. Take care!

***

About the Author:

Mabh Savage is a Pagan author, poet and musician, as well as a freelance journalist.

She is the author of A Modern Celt: Seeking the Ancestors and Pagan Portals – Celtic Witchcraft: Modern Witchcraft Meets Celtic Ways.

Four of Wands

(The Four of Wands card is from the artist Ciro Marchetti http://www.ciromarchetti.com/)**

This month we will complete our exploration of the Fours of the Minor Arcana. Last but certainly not least, we will talk about the Four of Wands, and we will think about how a combination of force (Wands/Fire) and form (the number 4) can interact within the Tarot Minors.

Yes, the Four of Wands is a Minor Arcana card, so as we know, the message offered by this card will most likely be more immediate in nature, or will most likely be connected to more day-to-day issues. As we have discovered during this journey through the cards, the easiest way to get a decent understanding of a Minor Arcana card is to examine its number (or in the case of Court Cards, its rank) and to examine its suit. In this case, we are dealing with the number 4, and the suit of Wands. As we have already discovered, these two ingredients alone could actually give us enough information about this one card to offer a useful interpretation. We have other useful things to consider, too, such as symbolism, astrology, and more.

The traditional image of the Four of Wands is of a scene of celebration. In the foreground are four Wands, two on the right and two on the left, connected by a garland of flowers tied in place by ribbons, all of which form a gateway or frame for what is beyond. Sometimes the Wands themselves are sprouting leaves and flowers. Through this gateway, we see a large castle or mansion with verdant plantings surrounding it; alongside the walls of the castle is a gathering of well-dressed adults and children. In the middle of the gateway, we see a man and a woman dressed splendidly, joyously holding flowers and greenery over their heads. The sky is clear and golden, and the entire atmosphere is one of peace and wealth and security, and celebration of achievements. This sense of achievement and possibility is sometimes created without people in the image; several cards show the gateway of adorned Wands with a castle on a hill in the distance, and a golden road leading us from the foreground, through the gateway and to that castle, seeming to promise that we won’t be sorry if we travel that road.

This month we are talking about the suit of Wands and the element of Fire. Besides the element of Fire, the suit of Wands corresponds with the playing card suit of Clubs, and the cardinal direction of South. In its natural state, the element of Fire is hot and dry. It tends to bring spontaneous change or impulsive, energetic effects. Fire is passionate in nature and it transforms everything it touches, everything in our world. Fire can sanitize or cleanse, and it can destroy everything in its path; Fire can warm us and keep us safe, or it can kill us.

All of the cards of the suit of Wands (including the Four of Wands) teach us about Fiery attributes like creativity, ambition, growth, passion and actions, and how their presence or absence can affect our lives. The suit of Wands represents our ability to experience joy and passion (including sexual passion), and the Wands cards can represent our creativity, our ability to be artistic or to be drawn to beautiful things. Fire often represents Spirit or the Divine Will, and Wands cards also can present the possibility of some interaction with Spirit or the Divine, or actions or passions manifesting in line with Divine Will.

The element of Fire can be seen as kinetic, or even electric. It has the power to create greatness (when we are inspired to be better than we think we can be), or destruction (when we believe we are greater than we actually are). Fire fuels innovation, but an imbalance or lack of Fire can bring austerity.

The number 4 is about solidification, discipline, balance, authority figures, a foundation being created, calmness, caution, being steady or difficult to shake up. There are four points to a compass, so the number 4 can represent everything around us as it is right now. If we remember that the number 3 usually represents the creation of something new, or the making real of concepts or understandings presented by the number 2, then we can see that the number 4 brings depth or solidity to that creation. On the negative side, the number 4 can represent energies that are slow and plodding, too conservative, or suspicious of or averse to change.

Within the Tarot, the Fours represent the concept of the cube, very stable and hard to tip over; here we have the pause that allows us to take a breath after activating the potential of the Ace through the partnership of the Two in order to manifest the creation of the Three. Briefly, we have the potential to experience an unexpected creative force and the confidence to wield it (the Ace of Wands), the personal power and authority that allows us to be a pioneer (the Two of Wands), and the ability to detach from a focus on ourselves in order to see the big picture and make effective plans (the Three of Wands). The Four of Wands offers a sense of excitement and celebration that comes with the completion of a job well done, as well as an anticipation of experiencing new possibilities that should present themselves thanks to past successes.

The astrological correspondence for the Four of Wands offers us a bit more depth of understanding; the Four of Wands represents the planet Venus when it is in the astrological sign of Aries.

In astrology, the planet Venus is seen as representing the Goddess of Love, Beauty and Pleasure. Venus is a feminine planet, which means its energies are inner and receptive in nature. Venus is associated with feelings and well-being and gentleness, friendship and fidelity, relationships of all kinds, youth, lust, fertility, travel, and an appreciation for art, social life, pleasing the senses, and beauty. And yes, sex and sexual pleasure are a part of this too. Venus is often seen as being a twin planet to our Earth; it orbits the Sun in 225 days, and is the second brightest object in the night sky, the Moon being the brightest. Venus guides us regarding relationships, feelings and love, and regarding giving and receiving, and since Venus is the second-most powerful beneficial planet (Jupiter is the first), we need to listen to her.

The astrological sign of Aries is a cardinal Fire sign that is a catalyst, a person that inspires others by being totally committed to his or her own vision. Aries is the first sign of the zodiac, the leader of the pack, first in line to get things going. Those born under this sign prefer to initiate, and they won’t shy away from anything new. Aries people are action oriented, assertive, and competitive. Aries is ruled by Mars, the God of War, bold and aggressive, and able to tap into the focus needed to take on any challenge. The symbol of Aries is the Ram, blunt and to the point, and a sheer force of nature. The great strength of those born under this sign is found in their initiative, courage and determination.

Once again, we are seeing an interaction of opposites: Venus is calm and loving and accepting, and is all about relationships, and Aries is assertive, determined, and self-focused (like any good leader). However if we look past the differences, we will see that this pairing offers us an opportunity to put ourselves first in a manner that is not abusive and selfish, but rather that enables us to learn about ourselves, and to discover what we personally need in order to be able to create and maintain beneficial relationships. It is through understanding our own needs and embracing them as valid and useful that we are able to attract to us what serves us the best.

The Fours have a place on the Tree of Life of the Qabalah; they are found in the sephira of Chesed in the middle of the Pillar of Force/Expansion. This sephira is seen as the place of both expansion and stability; there is that balance of opposites again. Chesed represents Mercy and tells us that love cannot happen without understanding. Chesed also represents the concept of authority, which brings the danger of self-righteousness and at the same time offers us the opportunity to learn humility.

In The Naked Tarot (the awesome book I reviewed last month; check it out!), the Four of Wands is described as representing the group that gathers when we are celebrating an important milestone or the accomplishment of a goal, with that celebration also promoting and encouraging unity. The gift offered by the Four of Wands is kinship: blood kinship, a kinship of heritage, and a kinship of community. This card tells us to bring about connections between the different groups in our lives, celebrate our accomplishments with those groups, and then take a bit of time for ourselves to ground and recharge.

There are subtle yet powerful differences between the Wild Unknown Four of Wands and the Three of Wands of the same deck. The Three give us a glimpse of a possible manifestation, swirling with fertile possibilities, visible through a small portal; the Four of Wands has enlarged and supported that portal so that it is a permanent structure. The foundation has been created, and it is solid. Now, we can not only more easily visualize the goals of the future, but we can also actually see them beginning to manifest in the physical world. The work we have done so far is acting as a lens, focusing our vision and supporting our efforts. A cause to celebrate, for sure!

The image on the Thoth Tarot Four of Wands, called “Completion,” shows a circle or spinning wheel with four Wands creating the spokes. On one end of each Wand is a representation of Aries and on the other end is a representation of Venus; the wheel spins smoothly because these opposing energies are balanced. Here we have the result of a balanced combination of harmony and effort and creativity that is meshed with effort, and we have the valuable conclusions gained through our efforts.

The Llewllyn Welsh Four of Wands shows four Wands, topped with flowers and ribbons, around and in the middle of a stream frothing around rocks. Behind and above the stream is a beautiful walled castle surrounded by verdant growth and topped by a merrily-fluttering banner. There are several bridges crossing the stream, giving access to the open gateway offering entry into the castle. This is one of the cards that offers a message without having a single person in the image. The keywords for this card are repose after difficulty, unexpected celebration, alliances and friendships, sharing of bounty, and achieving a state of balance after an ordeal.

The Legacy of the Divine Four of Wands shows four Wands topped with glowing crystals, each emitting a beam of light that meets in the center to form a protective canopy over the image. Within the archway created by those four Wands is a beautiful scene of green trees and green grass, with a rainbow arching over distant mountains and a stream flowing toward the viewer and falling out of the image into darkness. Along the outside of the wands, the tree branches are nude, the ground is brown and the skies are filled with gray clouds. Is the image under the canopy a reality being protected by the four Wands? Or is it a dream of possibility, the goal we are working so very hard to attain? The card brings us optimism and hope for the future.

The Four of Wands offers a clear message: opposing forces can work together in order to create security and safety without blocking or misdirecting creativity and potential. The Four of Wands tells us that if we have been working hard and using our talents and skills to achieve a goal, and that goal or achievement has arrived, we deserve to celebrate. Taking the time to share our success with those we love and including them in our celebration builds community. After all, important milestones require a commitment in order to be achieved, and sharing the benefits of those milestones once they are achieved builds a community that supports its members.

Celebrating the achievements of others brings even more joy, strength of community, and kinship into our lives. Through this kind of sharing, we create a strong foundation that promises growth, stability, security and well-being for the future . . . for everyone!

** We Feature the art of Ciro Marchetti as part of Tarot Talk. You can view his work and Decks at http://www.ciromarchetti.com/.

The Gilded Tarot (Book and Tarot Deck Set) on Amazon

***

About the Author:

Raushanna is a lifetime resident of New Jersey. As well as a professional Tarot Reader and Teacher, she is a practicing Wiccan (Third Degree, Sacred Mists Coven), a Usui Reiki Master/Teacher, a certified Vedic Thai-Yoga Massage Bodyworker, a 500-hr RYT Yoga Teacher specializing in chair assisted Yoga for movement disorders, and a Middle Eastern dance performer, choreographer and teacher.  Raushanna bought her first Tarot deck in 2005, and was instantly captivated by the images on the cards and the vast, deep and textured messages to be gleaned from their symbols. She loves reading about, writing about, and talking about the Tarot, and anything occult, mystical, or spiritual, as well as anything connected to the human subtle body. She has published a book, “The Emerald Tablet: My 24-Day Journal to Understanding,” and is currently working on a book about the Tarot, pathworking and the Tree of Life. Raushanna documents her experiences and her daily card throws in her blog, DancingSparkles.blogspot.com, which has been in existence since 2009. She and her husband, her son and step son, and her numerous friends and large extended family can often be found on the beaches, bike paths and hiking trails of the Cape May, NJ area.

The Emerald Tablet: My 24-Day Journal to Understanding on Amazon

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Cover art: Large Brown Fairy Garden decor Door Set with Accessories. Hand cast and painted by Jassmond Masters-Bell of the Etsy shop Fairy Behind the Door, featured in an interview this month with her.

About the door: This Fairy door belongs to Mrs Odina. She owns a Nights Fairy dormitory where she allows the traveling fairy to stop by and sleepover before they continue on their journey. She runs a tight tree house, her fees are fair but you have to bring your own berries and goats milk for breakfast. It says on the Door “Fairies Sleeping” so be quiet when you pass by.

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This month we have visitors! The Fae have come out for the Month of July to join us and our Readers at PaganPagesOrg. So pull up a Toadstool, Make a nice Cuppa, and Have a Great Read because we have brought you a Packed Issue to enjoy filled with Excellent Features Likes…

 

An interview with Jassmond Masters-Bell, owner of the Etsy Shop Fairy Behind the Door. Where all types of magickal items can be found created by this wonderful molding artisan.

 

When you see a tremendous wrong in the world do you just sit by and let it happen? Though Jennifer Engrácio , and PaganPagesOrg, usually stay out of political stances, human rights are being violated and she has something to say and we stand behind her! Please read Children and the Seven Generations. See where you stand.

 

A few new columns we will be adding in PaganPagesOrg are updates and features monthly on our favorite Podcasts. These are the ones we listen to and find to be the most informative and really top notch. We started, already, by bringing back broadcasts of Going Shamanic Radio. Now, we are proud to announce we will be featuring 3 Pagans and a Cat. Personally, I think you will love them from the first episode. How they make you feel secure on your path. The rounded knowledge. No fear in saying I don’t know. The learning, the sharing, the laughing. The correctness in information. This podcast is the complete package. A must listen.

 

An Interview with Astrid Brown. Astrid Brown is a medium, a psychic, and an incredibly prolific author. Her most recent offering, A Psychic Affair, blends the mysteries of psychic development with the romance genre, exploring how long-distance relationships can develop not only through the words and messages we send, but through a true, psychic connection.

 

This month starts a new column: Mojo Bag of the Month, beginning with a bag that will help to raise your vibration! With the many shifts and changes that are coming, we need to raise our vibration to ride out the wave. Have a read to see what you need for this month’s bag.

 

This month Robin Fennelly reviews the book Moon Magic: Your Complete Guide to Harnessing the Mystical Energy of the Moon by author Diane Ahlquist. Robin breaks down this book for us explaining all this volume has to offer and if it’s worth adding to our libraries.

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We would like to thank all our loyal readers for this award. You like us, you really like us!

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Join us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ Community, Instagram, & YouTube.

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Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: ‘What! You too? I thought I was the only one.” – C.S. Lewis

 

 

The
King of Wands

(The King of Wands card is from the artist Ciro Marchetti http://www.ciromarchetti.com/)**

We
haven’t looked at the Court Cards of the Tarot for a while. This
month we will return to the Tarot “royals” and get to know the
King of Wands. First, we should review some foundational
information.

The
78 cards of a Tarot deck consist of 22 Major Arcana cards (dealing
with broader and more far-reaching life experience issues, and
archetypes that are easy for us to identify with and connect with at
some point in our lives) and 56 Minor Arcana cards (customarily
grouped into four categories or suits that represent the four
elements and dealing with day-to-day issues).

The
Court Cards are a part of the Minor Arcana, acting as a
representation of the family unit and individually representing
particular personality traits of people, places and events in our
lives. These cards can also tell us about our own personality, and
how it is perceived by others. Thinking
of Tarot cards as people, with each card having an individual
personality, is particularly appropriate for the Court Cards, as they
are the most human of all the cards in a Tarot deck. Even the
illustrations for the Court Cards show humans in the majority of
Tarot decks.

Instead
of numbers, Court Cards have rank. The lowest ranking Court Card is
the Page, the messenger or intern or apprentice who is still learning
of life and living, but who is also good at dealing with the
unexpected. Next comes the Knight, the representation of strong,
focused and even excessive manifestations of his suit.

Both
the Queen and the King represent mature adults. The Queen manifests
her suit in a feminine or yin or inner way, and the King manifests
his suit in a masculine or yang or outer way. This manifestation
does not necessarily correspond to gender; a man can be represented
by a Tarot Queen if he has a strong inner focus, and a woman can be
represented by a Tarot King if she projects a strong sense of
authority. Since we are talking about the King of Wands today, we
already know that our King will manifest his suit in an outer yet
mature manner. Our King is concerned
with results; he exhibits outer, public expertise in his field, and
he is an authority figure. In many ways, the Kings of the Tarot
Court can be seen as four facets of The Emperor of the Major Arcana.

Our
King’s suit this month is Wands, corresponding with the element of
Fire. Besides the element of Fire, the playing card suit of Clubs,
and the cardinal direction of South. All of the cards of the suit of
Wands teach us about Fiery attributes like creativity, ambition,
growth, passion and actions, and how their presence or absence can
affect our lives. The suit of Wands represents our ability to
experience joy and passion (including sexual passion), and the Wands
cards can represent our creativity, our ability to be artistic or to
be drawn to beautiful things. Fire often represents Spirit or the
Divine Will, and Wands cards also can present the possibility of some
interaction with Spirit or the Divine, or actions or passions
manifesting in line with Divine Will.

In
the Tarot Court, the suit of the card has an elemental
correspondence, and the rank of the card has an elemental
correspondence. Pages correspond with Earth, Knights correspond with
either Air or Fire (depending on the deck), Queens correspond with
Water, and Kings correspond with either Air or Fire (depending on the
deck). Since we are talking about a King today, we are also talking
about the element of Air, or the element of Fire, depending on the
deck. For our purposes today, we will see the King of Wands as Fire
of Fire.

In
its natural state, the element of Fire is hot and dry. It tends to
bring spontaneous change or impulsive, energetic effects. Fire
transforms everything in our world. Fire can sanitize or cleanse,
and it can destroy everything in its path; Fire can warm us and keep
us safe, or it can kill us.

The
element of Fire can be seen as kinetic, or even electric. It has the
power to create greatness (when we are inspired to be better than we
think we can be), or destruction (when we believe we are greater than
we actually are). Fire fuels innovation, but an imbalance or lack of
Fire can bring austerity.

Like
the other cards of the Tarot, Court Cards have astrological
correspondences. Our King of Wands corresponds with the cusp or
joining point of the signs of Cancer and Leo.

Cancer
is responsive, emotional and generous, but also is moody, insecure or
sensitive, and is often affected by the environment and people
nearby. Those born under the sign of Cancer, the 4th sign of the
zodiac, tend to experience strong feelings and emotions, and they are
very protective of those feelings and emotions. Cancer people tend
to be very attuned to the past, and like to have mementos of the
times and people of their childhood. Cancer people place a high
importance on family, both family of the blood and family of the
heart, and nurture and protect those they love. Cancer people are
hard workers, and that paycheck is important not only for what it
will buy, but also for the security it provides.

Leo
is the 5th sign of the zodiac, located in the middle of Summer. The
symbol of Leo is the Lion, regal and strong, magnetic and forceful.
Leos are determined, ambitious, and highly motivated; add in their
charm and they are natural leaders who attract many friends. They
make good organizers and motivators, and the best use of a Leo is as
the leader of a large group. Leo is the most expressive sign in the
zodiac, and those born under this sign are showmen who are exuberant
and passionate, but they are also susceptible to flattery.

Cancer
and Leo are ruled by elements, planets, and traits that are not
similar. Cancer is a cardinal water sign ruled by the moon, and Leo
is a fixed fire sign ruled by the sun. Cancer is considered to be
quite sensitive and docile, but can survive and even manipulate. Leo
is considered to be powerful and dominant, but can move from roaring
to purring if treated in the right manner. Thus, this cusp can
manifest an interesting set of personality traits, such as the memory
of an elephant, a comfort with being the center of drama, being
driven by high ambitions and the need to achieve something bigger
than oneself. Love, devotion, family, and loyalty form an integral
aspect of both of these signs, and is a strong part of this cusp.

Because
they are Minor Arcana cards, Court Cards also correspond with a
sephira on the Tree of Life. The Kings correspond with the sephira
of Chokmah, along with all of the Twos of the Minor Arcana and the
element of Fire. The Kings sit at the top of the Pillar of Force in
the sephira of Chokmah, representing the
Sacred Masculine and the Catalyst of Life. Chokmah is seen as
dynamic thrust, the Ultimate Positive, the Great Stimulator and the
Great Fertilizer (one of the symbols of Chokmah is the penis), and
thus is connected to the Wheel of the Year. The energies of this
sephira represent dynamic male energy and are the origin of vital
force and polarity.

The
Llewellyn Welsh King of Wands shows a mature man sitting on a throne,
holding a Wand with green leaves sprouting and ribbons blowing. This
card is about status, honor, and personal achievement that not only
brings material success, but also contributions related to the arts,
the sciences or to quality of life. In this card there is the
passion of the Knight, however there is stability to balance out that
passion, allowing the achievement of a position of influence and of
satisfaction.

In the
Thoth Tarot, the Kings are known as Knights (the Knights are called
Princes in this deck), and Crowley sees the Knight (King) of Wands as
being the strongest of the Court Cards. In “Understanding Aleister
Crowley’s Thoth Tarot,” DuQuette describes the Knight (King) of
Wands as like “. . . riding a rocket, and that can be very risky.
If the rocket isn’t aimed properly, he or she misses the target.
If there is not enough fuel, he or she crashes. If there is too much
fuel, the person explodes. But if everything goes well, it is the
most spectacular of successes.” I could not describe the powerful
yet risky energies of this card in a better way.

The
Naked Tarot describes the King of Wands as someone you either admire
or envy, someone whose charisma and confidence draw others like a
moth to a flame. The King of Wands is compelled to accomplish
something meaningful with his life, and thus he is appalled and
enraged by dishonesty and incompetence. This King thrives on
challenges and handles stress with ease, and can’t be bought or
lured from his chosen path. His beneficial traits are an interest in
self-growth and personal advancement, a fascination with the ideas,
inventions and achievements of others, the courage to try new things,
and the ability to use constructive criticism to bring progress. His
detrimental traits are a tendency to do too much, to offend others
(either accidentally or on purpose), and to be a control freak.

The
Legacy of the Divine King of Wands stands, glowing scepter in his
hands, before a fire that is contained and controlled. His passion
is idealistic, and his intellect strengthens his will. His gift is
leadership, and his self-confidence and charisma are tempered by his
need to nurture and protect his loved ones.

The
Kings of the Tarot Court tend to be proactive, and the King of Wands
is the most proactive of them all. He comes up with valuable ideas,
but he also initiates the manifestation of the ideas of others. He
is open to hearing challenges to his own ideas; indeed he often sees
those challenges as opportunities. The King of Wands expects to be
obeyed; he may ask for courage, boldness, and commitment, and expect
innovation and generosity and the taking of responsibility from
others, but he will ask the same things of himself.

Yes,
the King of Wands can tend toward arrogance and rudeness, egotism and
a tendency to be a despot, but he can also be a wise and loving
father, a visionary who inspires others to enthusiasm, and a mentor
with a powerful ability to motivate others to be the best they can
be. The King of Wands makes his own luck, and he tells us that we
can make our own luck, too!

**
We Feature the art of Ciro
Marchetti 
as part of Tarot Talk. You can view his work and
Decks at http://www.ciromarchetti.com/.

The Gilded Tarot (Book and Tarot Deck Set) on Amazon

***

About
the Author:

Raushanna is
a lifetime resident of New Jersey. As well as a professional Tarot
Reader and Teacher, she is a practicing Wiccan (Third Degree, Sacred
Mists Coven), a Usui Reiki Master/Teacher, a certified Vedic
Thai-Yoga Massage Bodyworker, a 500-hr RYT Yoga Teacher
specializing in chair assisted Yoga for movement disorders, and a
Middle Eastern dance performer, choreographer and teacher.  Raushanna
bought her first Tarot deck in 2005, and was instantly captivated by
the images on the cards and the vast, deep and textured messages to
be gleaned from their symbols. She loves reading about, writing
about, and talking about the Tarot, and anything occult, mystical, or
spiritual, as well as anything connected to the human subtle body.
She has published a book, “The
Emerald Tablet: My 24-Day Journal to Understanding
,” and is
currently working on a book about the Tarot, pathworking and the Tree
of Life. Raushanna documents her experiences and her daily card
throws in her blog, DancingSparkles.blogspot.com,
which has been in existence since 2009. She and her husband, her son
and step son, and her numerous friends and large extended family can
often be found on the beaches, bike paths and hiking trails of the
Cape May, NJ area.

The Emerald Tablet: My 24-Day Journal to Understanding on Amazon

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